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Subject: McConnell on Trump's 100 day plan. rss

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Mac Mcleod
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http://www.wnd.com/2016/11/mcconnell-throws-cold-water-on-pa...
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At the end of October, Donald Trump spoke in Gettysburg, Pa., and released a plan for his first 100 days in office.

The plan (below) outlines three main areas of focus: cleaning up Washington, including by imposing term limits on Congress; protecting American workers; and restoring rule of law. He also laid out his plan for working with Congress to introduce 10 pieces of legislation that would repeal Obamacare, fund the construction of a wall at the Southern border (with a provision that Mexico would reimburse the U.S.), encourage infrastructure investment, rebuild military bases, promote school choice and more.

On Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell mostly made nice with Trump but also shot down or expressed little enthusiasm in some of his plans. On Trump’s proposal to impose term limits on Congress, McConnell said, “It will not be on the agenda in the Senate.” McConnell has been a long-standing opponent of term limits, as NPR’s Susan Davis reports. “I would say we have term limits now — they’re called elections.”

McConnell also threw some cold water on Trump’s infrastructure plans, calling it not a top priority.

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maxo-texas wrote:
http://www.wnd.com/2016/11/mcconnell-throws-cold-water-on-pa...
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McConnell also threw some cold water on Trump’s infrastructure plans, calling it not a top priority.



Yeah, I was pretty sure the ONLY thing I've heard out of Trump's mouth so far that didn't scare or sicken me would not be acceptable to the professional GOP.
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Leo Zappa
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Sounds like McConnell will just be the latest in a long line of people who have underestimated Mr. Trump. I wonder how that will work out for him.

Like Bill Maher said last night on his show, you have to hand it to Trump for winning the toughest race on the planet. He's got some kind of talent.
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Oliver Dienz
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maxo-texas wrote:

Quote:

McConnell also threw some cold water on Trump’s infrastructure plans, calling it not a top priority.


You really have to wonder how people have come to think the Republicans are better at economics. Imagine a CEO going to the shareholder meeting and saying that maintaining and expanding their plants is not a "top priority". Are the US supposed to stop growing their economy?
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Greg Michealson
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maxo-texas wrote:
http://www.wnd.com/2016/11/mcconnell-throws-cold-water-on-pa...
Quote:
At the end of October, Donald Trump spoke in Gettysburg, Pa., and released a plan for his first 100 days in office.

The plan (below) outlines three main areas of focus: cleaning up Washington, including by imposing term limits on Congress; protecting American workers; and restoring rule of law. He also laid out his plan for working with Congress to introduce 10 pieces of legislation that would repeal Obamacare, fund the construction of a wall at the Southern border (with a provision that Mexico would reimburse the U.S.), encourage infrastructure investment, rebuild military bases, promote school choice and more.

On Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell mostly made nice with Trump but also shot down or expressed little enthusiasm in some of his plans. On Trump’s proposal to impose term limits on Congress, McConnell said, “It will not be on the agenda in the Senate.” McConnell has been a long-standing opponent of term limits, as NPR’s Susan Davis reports. “I would say we have term limits now — they’re called elections.”

McConnell also threw some cold water on Trump’s infrastructure plans, calling it not a top priority.



So much for anti-establishment working with the establishment.

What's confounding to me is that Americans want an "outsider" (which could mean an absolute lunatic as long as they don't know much about how politics work in Washington) for President, but continually elect the same insiders for Senate and House seats. The irony just makes my head explode thinking about it.

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Leo Zappa
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Here's the thing, Trump has no ideology whatsoever. He's no more Republican than he is Democrat. That means among other things that he doesn't see an 'aisle' in Congress - he doesn't care about "D's" and "R's" behind representatives' names. I suspect he's going to approach his job like he would one of his construction projects, which is to say he will lay out what he wants to do, and work with whoever he needs to do get the job done. On something like infrastructure, he will likely get a lot of Democrats supporting the idea, and more than a few Republicans. It sounds like McConnell is operating under the old rules, and I think he might be surprised when he sees real bipartisan cooperation being driven by the White House.

Think about it, during the campaign, Trump's primary target was not the Democratic Party per se, or Democratic representatives in Congress, it was 90% about Hillary, and maybe 10% about Obama. I don't really recall him saying anything like "The Democrats are wrong and we have to stop them". It was all "crooked Hillary". So, if he puts some plans out there that would potentially help everyone, like infrastructure, I think he will get support from both parties, and I think McConnell will find himself with mass defections behind his back.

There is probably only one area where ideology is going to be an issue, and it's the issue which drove me to vote for Hillary. The issue is Supreme Court nominees. Even here, it's not so much that Trump has any particular ideological bent, but his VP sure does, and plenty of those who voted for Trump do as well. Other than this area, though, I think Trump is going to be very pragmatic about how to go about his business. Time will tell.
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Wendell
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desertfox2004 wrote:
Here's the thing, Trump has no ideology whatsoever. He's no more Republican than he is Democrat. That means among other things that he doesn't see an 'aisle' in Congress - he doesn't care about "D's" and "R's" behind representatives' names. I suspect he's going to approach his job like he would one of his construction projects, which is to say he will lay out what he wants to do, and work with whoever he needs to do get the job done. On something like infrastructure, he will likely get a lot of Democrats supporting the idea, and more than a few Republicans. It sounds like McConnell is operating under the old rules, and I think he might be surprised when he sees real bipartisan cooperation being driven by the White House.

Think about it, during the campaign, Trump's primary target was not the Democratic Party per se, or Democratic representatives in Congress, it was 90% about Hillary, and maybe 10% about Obama. I don't really recall him saying anything like "The Democrats are wrong and we have to stop them". It was all "crooked Hillary". So, if he puts some plans out there that would potentially help everyone, like infrastructure, I think he will get support from both parties, and I think McConnell will find himself with mass defections behind his back.


You may be right, but the rules of the Senate and House give a lot of power to key individuals. Like McConnell.
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Greg Michealson
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wifwendell wrote:
desertfox2004 wrote:
Here's the thing, Trump has no ideology whatsoever. He's no more Republican than he is Democrat. That means among other things that he doesn't see an 'aisle' in Congress - he doesn't care about "D's" and "R's" behind representatives' names. I suspect he's going to approach his job like he would one of his construction projects, which is to say he will lay out what he wants to do, and work with whoever he needs to do get the job done. On something like infrastructure, he will likely get a lot of Democrats supporting the idea, and more than a few Republicans. It sounds like McConnell is operating under the old rules, and I think he might be surprised when he sees real bipartisan cooperation being driven by the White House.

Think about it, during the campaign, Trump's primary target was not the Democratic Party per se, or Democratic representatives in Congress, it was 90% about Hillary, and maybe 10% about Obama. I don't really recall him saying anything like "The Democrats are wrong and we have to stop them". It was all "crooked Hillary". So, if he puts some plans out there that would potentially help everyone, like infrastructure, I think he will get support from both parties, and I think McConnell will find himself with mass defections behind his back.


You may be right, but the rules of the Senate and House give a lot of power to key individuals. Like McConnell.


The people have Kentucky have spoken. They want an outsider in the White House, but enjoy keeping Mr. "Gridlock" McConnell firmly in his Senate seat. Baffling. Truly baffling.

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Michael Tagge
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desertfox2004 wrote:
Here's the thing, Trump has no ideology whatsoever. He's no more Republican than he is Democrat. That means among other things that he doesn't see an 'aisle' in Congress - he doesn't care about "D's" and "R's" behind representatives' names. I suspect he's going to approach his job like he would one of his construction projects, which is to say he will lay out what he wants to do, and work with whoever he needs to do get the job done. On something like infrastructure, he will likely get a lot of Democrats supporting the idea, and more than a few Republicans. It sounds like McConnell is operating under the old rules, and I think he might be surprised when he sees real bipartisan cooperation being driven by the White House.

Think about it, during the campaign, Trump's primary target was not the Democratic Party per se, or Democratic representatives in Congress, it was 90% about Hillary, and maybe 10% about Obama. I don't really recall him saying anything like "The Democrats are wrong and we have to stop them". It was all "crooked Hillary". So, if he puts some plans out there that would potentially help everyone, like infrastructure, I think he will get support from both parties, and I think McConnell will find himself with mass defections behind his back.

There is probably only one area where ideology is going to be an issue, and it's the issue which drove me to vote for Hillary. The issue is Supreme Court nominees. Even here, it's not so much that Trump has any particular ideological bent, but his VP sure does, and plenty of those who voted for Trump do as well. Other than this area, though, I think Trump is going to be very pragmatic about how to go about his business. Time will tell.
Hear, hear. Especially the last paragraph. He could end up begin one of the best Presidents, he could end up being one of the worst. It's far to early to tell. The real question is what he will do with Executive Orders. Most of his policy proposals are actually up to Congress to enact.
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Michael Tagge
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mrspank wrote:

The people have Kentucky have spoken. They want an outsider in the White House, but enjoy keeping Mr. "Gridlock" McConnell firmly in his Senate seat. Baffling. Truly baffling.

Binary choice, either Mitch or the Democrat that ran against him. The system in fundamentally broken.
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desertfox2004 wrote:
Here's the thing, Trump has no ideology whatsoever. He's no more Republican than he is Democrat. That means among other things that he doesn't see an 'aisle' in Congress - he doesn't care about "D's" and "R's" behind representatives' names. I suspect he's going to approach his job like he would one of his construction projects, which is to say he will lay out what he wants to do, and work with whoever he needs to do get the job done.


the problem with this theory is that someone with no ideology whatsoever is similarly not committed to anything firm in any political sense

during the campaign, Trump repeatedly twisted in the wind whenever necessary; he thought trans rights were important then he decided trans people were just freaking people out needlessly; he was for universal healthcare and then he wasn't; he was pro-choice, then pro-life, then so pro-life that he believed in punishing abortive mothers, and then not quite that pro-life

the point is that trump's lack of ideology is not a strength, because it means his only barometer for achievement is "can I call this a success" - having no firm beliefs means that he can (and will) call practically anything a success, and his lack of firm beliefs means he can be swayed into believing whatever is convenient to him at any given point

be prepared for the likes of "i wanted term limits, but the thing about deals is sometimes you give something up to get something else you want, so I gave up term limits and in exchange Mitch McConnell gave me [thing they wanted in the first place and convinced Trump would be popular]"

(the one exception to this is probably the wall, just because that's the one thing he promised over and over again and because it became his catchphrase)
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Mac Mcleod
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mrspank wrote:
wifwendell wrote:
desertfox2004 wrote:
Here's the thing, Trump has no ideology whatsoever. He's no more Republican than he is Democrat. That means among other things that he doesn't see an 'aisle' in Congress - he doesn't care about "D's" and "R's" behind representatives' names. I suspect he's going to approach his job like he would one of his construction projects, which is to say he will lay out what he wants to do, and work with whoever he needs to do get the job done. On something like infrastructure, he will likely get a lot of Democrats supporting the idea, and more than a few Republicans. It sounds like McConnell is operating under the old rules, and I think he might be surprised when he sees real bipartisan cooperation being driven by the White House.

Think about it, during the campaign, Trump's primary target was not the Democratic Party per se, or Democratic representatives in Congress, it was 90% about Hillary, and maybe 10% about Obama. I don't really recall him saying anything like "The Democrats are wrong and we have to stop them". It was all "crooked Hillary". So, if he puts some plans out there that would potentially help everyone, like infrastructure, I think he will get support from both parties, and I think McConnell will find himself with mass defections behind his back.


You may be right, but the rules of the Senate and House give a lot of power to key individuals. Like McConnell.


The people have Kentucky have spoken. They want an outsider in the White House, but enjoy keeping Mr. "Gridlock" McConnell firmly in his Senate seat. Baffling. Truly baffling.



Say Trump does have some stroke. Opposing him could change the opinion of the citizens of Kentucky to vote for a Trump/Pence type of candidate. So someone less controlled and more theocratic.

The tricky bit with the racist backers is that unless Trump and the republicans deliver some racist programs, they will lose those backers. So we'll probably see rollbacks of affirmative action and approval of minority voter suppression (yuck) or similar programs.

The funny thing is, if a liberal californians moved to the flyover states by 2018 or 2020, it would flip the vote. Wyoming has a teeny amount of voters and only 70% of them vote conservative. It would take about 40,000 votes to flip that election.

---

On a side note, I keep thinking about the John Goodman episode of the west wing. In that set of episodes he was a very conservative scary speaker of the house who took over the government when the president's daughter was kidnapped and the vice president had stepped down.

It was a VERY good arc about our democratic institutions. I do have faith in our democracy and I have faith in the bad aspects of our democracy to reign Trump in some.

I just think on some issues like on Abortion, that's going to be it for the next 20-30 years. I think it's going to get harder to get birth control as well for at least 4 years. And I'm worried about voter suppression locking things in for a long time.

OTH, liberal voters can get ahead of this by registering NOW and educating themselves.

 
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I'm half wondering if this isn't where Trump's recent "maybe we won't repeal Obamacare" statements are coming from.

After all, that's something half of the re-elected Republicans have campaigned on - it's something they NEED to have happen to get through their next election...Trump taking that off the table might be just a ploy to get them willing to bargain around the other ideas he has that they've said are non-starters.

IE., put term limits in place (we'll make them long so you don't have much to worry about), ban Washington-lobbyist revolving doors, then sure - we'll get rid of Obamacare. Otherwise, no.
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XanderF wrote:
I'm half wondering if this isn't where Trump's recent "maybe we won't repeal Obamacare" statements are coming from.

After all, that's something half of the re-elected Republicans have campaigned on - it's something they NEED to have happen to get through their next election...Trump taking that off the table might be just a ploy to get them willing to bargain around the other ideas he has that they've said are non-starters.

IE., put term limits in place (we'll make them long so you don't have much to worry about), ban Washington-lobbyist revolving doors, then sure - we'll get rid of Obamacare. Otherwise, no.

It does seem like a negotiating tactic.

Let's go back to term limits and "draining the swamp" by banning the congress-to-lobbyist cycle. One compromise that might work is for Trump to propose a five- or ten- or twenty-fold increase in Congressional pension payments if it's coupled with a strong combination of term limits and/or lobbying bans. This exorbitant increase in pension payments could then have a sunset provision of, say, twelve years, with the benefit increase being gradually lowered every two years until it reaches the current level (inflation-adjusted) twelve years out.

Pay them to leave and find other opportunities. Also, dangle a chunk of change large enough that they'll think twice about accepting another re-election contribution from Megacorp X while at the same time discouraging Megacorp X from funding the endless stream of re-election seekers.

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god watching RSP cons make themselves deeply believe how Trump really really wants to end lobbyist influence is funny as all fuck when his transition team is literally a bunch of lobbyists plus his kids
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