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Fleurus 1794» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Fleurus – what’s in the packet? rss

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Andrew Hobley
United Kingdom
Andover
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As the game comes in a ziplock rather than a box once cannot really ‘unbox’ it. But what do you get?

First and most importantly NO MAPS. You need to have both Napoleon’s Last Gamble and the Expansion kit, as you will need the south NLG map and the southern extension map for Fleurus, the north NLG map for Mont Saint Jean and all three for the four day mini-campaign. There are also no cards and no TLNB rules – you use the card packs and rules that comes with NLG.

Other than that the components are those found in other OSG/TLNB games – and of the usual high quality. Two set up sheets and two casualty record tracks, a list of cards to remove from the decks, turn record tracks for Fleurus (25-26 June), Mont-St Jean (6-7 July) and the campaign 25-28 June.

The Study Folder is in the usual style – general information about rules for both armies; supply, victory points and then four scenarios. A long days battle (6am to 8pm) for 28 June as Jourdan tried to hold off the Allied columns; an Approach to Battle starting the day before with Charleroi still under French siege and the Allies in with a chance of breaking this. Then a rear-guard action that could have happened had the Allies decided to stand and fight on a ridgeline south of an obscure farm called Mont St Jean. Finally the four day campaign game. Then there is a history of the battle, assembled by the designer, Derek Lang, mainly from French and German sources, and possibly the first decent account in English.

Finally the counters. A real multi-national affair with French, Dutch, Austrians, Hessians, Hanoverians, British and a French Royalist vedette. On the French side we have Jourdan, not a lacklustre French marshal but a keen revolutionary general. Among the other leaders we have an Austrian called Charles and French called Soult and Lefebvre – I wonder if they will come to anything in the future? And we have the Grand Old Duke of York and his army – who may appear as an alternate reinforcement. And if they do in the 33rd Regiment of Foot, in Balfour’s Brigade is one Arthur Wellesley, an obscure Irish Aristocratic Lieutenant-Colonel on his first campaign.

And among the counters something never before seen on any battlefield -

an observation balloon! This allows the French to inspect enemy stacks out of the normal three hex line of sight, or cards in the Allied hand - although good results are not guaranteed.

How the scenarios play remain to be seen, but I think this is an excellent enhancement to NLG. Derek Lang is to be congratulated on the idea and design, and Kevin Zucker for supporting it.


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Wojtek Kamusella
Poland
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Great review Andrew.
Battles seems to be much smaller to other ones from this series.
 
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Andrew Hobley
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Depends which ones you play. Fleurus was 73,000 French v 68,000 Allies. Wagram 150,000 French v 170,000 Austrians; Borodino around 150,000 each. So yes, this smaller than some.

But Waterloo itself had 73,000 French v 68,000 Anglo-Allies (excluding the Prussians); Ligny 68,000 v 74,000, others are similar sizes. So the actual numbers are similar to the 'normal' size battles.

But there are fewer actual unit counters as there is just one battle and so no need for units that weren't in say, Brienne, but were at Vauchampes.
 
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