Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

Peloponnes Card Game» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Tweek made it a great game rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Don Crowe
Canada
flag msg tools
Decided to put this as a review rather than call it a variant
because it's quite minor & one can revert back later by
calling this the "introductory" variant - but we haven't had
any desire to do so. Also I had all the displeasure that
Tom Vasel & others had with the disaster triggers and for this
reason I thought I should post this.

PtCG might now be our best game amongst Castles of Burgundy, Glass Road,
Suburbia, Targi, Power Grid, Hawaii, Stone Age, Macao, Keyflower.
Well you get the idea. Peloponnes simply contains both rich depth,
variety / replayability and fun factor for us.

But we simply made each disaster track one step longer i.e. at
set up the grey marker does not start until the market card
determination. So now it takes one space longer. Also when
disaster strikes you lose your card if unprotected. No covering
with a card to reverse later. All rest of the rules stay as is.

The disaster tension is still there. For us, two triggers often
happen. You will take steps to protect / avoid / mitigate.
But the game now spreads out and you find you are enjoying a
beautifully designed game. You get to do the following :

- Work on a card generating and end of game scoring 'people'
engine. So people icon cards are important.
- Make use of the Luxury Goods mechanic which is very rewarding
and can be part of your early strategy. So resource icon
cards are important.
- Look for special abilities on bottom of cards such as paying
less on the 3+ market row or receiving an extra card(s), luxury
goods etc. So bonuses are important.
- Deciding what to hold & bid from your hand to meet requirements
of purchasing/bidding/feeding/people points/construction fulfill-
ment/generating luxury goods. So hand management is important.
But fun & not complex as you have goals & see possibilities to
compare too in looking at the market. And the choices are all
interesting.
- Checking for the gold points and fed people balance.
- Enjoying the auction keeping in mind the transfer rule
should you withdraw and re-locate your bid (can't change it
& must be sufficient to cover cost elsewhere). With more
players this can end up as multiple moves & counter bids if
your bid re-location is occupied by another player's bid.
More fun !
- And yes the Disasters. But now it's fun to get that three
of a kind. Or engineer to choose 1st to guess you might
have a shot at buying a prevention icon card. Or bid high to
grab that card in the Auction row. The tension doesn't
leave but that tiny bit more planning allowed (variant above)
puts this as one of multiple objectives rather than heavily
slanting PtCG as a 50% disaster mitigation game. Loss of
a card still happens but you'll have had time to steer the
ship & enjoy it as a challenge.

In the list above, I missed another game I own - Notre Dame.
Rats are damaging but you have control and it also works.
Same with need to feed of Stone Age. Hawaii has a pretty
good point incentive to always meet the Round minimum values
which get higher each round. Many games have penalties etc.
They add tension and add interest. With the small tweek above
PtCG immediately fell into that category for us.

There is a surprising ton of variety in this game yet has a
modest footprint in time and area.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin B. Smith
United States
Mercer Island
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Personally, I prefer the game as written. But I can totally see how making the disaster track longer would make it more enjoyable for some people.

One odd side effect, however is that some disasters actually become more crippling. For example, an early earthquake means you are free to add buildings without fear for the rest of the game. Having all the disasters pushed to the last round or two makes them more devastating, if they happen and you aren't protected.

Similarly, your other tweak (of not allowing them to be covered) makes disasters harsher than in the rules as written.

So I'm glad you found some houserules you enjoy. And I agree that it's probably best framed as an "introductory" variant. But I don't think it will be better for everyone.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Simon Maynard
United Kingdom
Exeter
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmb
Indeed, I wonder why the ability to cover an affected card has been removed in this variant? Is that intentionally to make it more devastating? Personally, I think the dilemma when a catastrophe strikes, whether or not to sacrifice a coin card to cover the affected power cards or simply abandon them, is one of the interesting decisions in the game. I wouldn't like to remove it.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin B. Smith
United States
Mercer Island
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Fried Egg wrote:
Indeed, I wonder why the ability to cover an affected card has been removed in this variant? Is that intentionally to make it more devastating? Personally, I think the dilemma when a catastrophe strikes, whether or not to sacrifice a coin card to cover the affected power cards or simply abandon them, is one of the interesting decisions in the game. I wouldn't like to remove it.

If this is really an "introductory" variant, intended only for the first play or two, then this simplification might make sense. It would be much easier to explain. But beyond that, I agree.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Don Crowe
Canada
flag msg tools
Late reply, sorry. Valid comments. We've found with the longer
disaster track helps in two ways :
1) You have enough time to maneuver and avoid a few disasters then
maybe get lucky on one. This becomes part of your game play
strategy, kind of like Notre Dame avoiding the rats. With the
shorter track it seems you can only mitigate not avoid or plan
for. The odds of 3 of a kind prevention working involves huge
luck, so this element of game play is mostly removed.
Therefore you accept, for example, landscape disaster will trigger
and focus on cities etc. But even then you probably can't keep
up and have to accept a forced re-set as part of game play. The
longer track worked in giving you the tools to avoid the forced
re-set. But will you take the right steps ? My skilled
friend is often better at this than me. A fun game play happens.
2) With the longer track you can build your tableau such that if you
end up taking a disaster or decide to take a disaster it's not
or doesn't have to be the end of your game. But still a nice
adversity & in the spirit of the game. More devastating than
covering with a card ? In balance overall I'd still say a lot
less than the original rules. You also get less bookkeeping
with the now dead card remaining until the end of the game plus
you still need to get protection or 3 of a kind to reverse it
& score it even though the disaster is removed. This on top
of the rest of your objectives in growing your civilization
and still guarding against the rest of the disasters. Too much
I believe and for the average player they can often end up in a
downward spiral. This was my experience when I set the game
up after 1st buying it & trying it several times. It drew
me in but always frustrated with the forced re-set with almost
no control over it. I also saw other comments reflecting this.
In fact I nearly sold it . Then I tried this variant and it came together.

Here's what happened. It ended up being our most played game.
Deep, quick, challenging and fun in a short time frame - perfect for
the coffee shop. We alternate between this and Targi and Akrotiri.
But now we're playing a lot of Voyages of Marco Polo (just got it)
- so we appreciate Peloponnes card game even amongst the longer
popular games. But it took this tweek. Happy gaming and appreciate
the comments.


1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gimpinn Jonsson
msg tools
I bought Peloponnes the Card Game mainly as a solo game without any intent to play it with my SO or regular gaming group. These tweeks might change that. Thanks!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.