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Hero Realms» Forums » General

Subject: White Wizard Games Fair 2016 (Nov. 18 - 21) rss

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Martin
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Hello community

Will someone of you attend at the fair this weekend?

If so, could you tell us what WWG has up in the sleeve for the hero realms campaign, there will be a preview.

Thank you,

the friendly alien from your neighborhood ;P
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I will be there and getting a campaign preview is one of my top priorities.
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Martin
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ThinkingThatsAll wrote:
I will be there and getting a campaign preview is one of my top priorities.

Sounds awesome, I wish you a great time.
 
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Martin
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You should test the new necromancer game.
This time Rob and/or Darwin didn't design it.

I could've tested it in Essen but it was already almost evening and I wanted to go back home to play hero realms with my gifriend which I received there.
If I wouldn't have been one day later for two weeks on vacation in the USA I would have stayed at the fair.

Nevertheless I had a look at the cards and talked a little bit about the game before I left.
It won't be as simple as hero/star realms and take much longer.
At the beginning of a match you choose 3 magic schools out of 10 (I think it was 10). There were 3 battlefields (3 times london) which will be fought at.

The designer of the game was in Essen and you could play a match vs. him.

The setting of the game will be much darker than hero realms.

The information I got (in Essen) was that there shall be a kickstarter campaign soon.

EDIT: Typo
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Martin
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Any news?
 
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Roger the Alien wrote:
Any news?


I still need to gather my thoughts and write it up. Short version: Hero Realms campaign is looking to over deliver. Sorcerer is heavy.
 
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Martin
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ThinkingThatsAll wrote:
Roger the Alien wrote:
Any news?


I still need to gather my thoughts and write it up. Short version: Hero Realms campaign is looking to over deliver. Sorcerer is heavy.

Thank you for the update.
I am already curious to read your full review.
 
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Sorry, I got a bit wordy with my blog post (you can read it here).

My thoughts on Sorcerer are:

Quote:
Sorcerer is a 2 player direct conflict tactical card game. It has a darker theme and heavier game weight than any of their previous products. Each player is an evil sorcerer living in Victorian London and trying to overrun 2 of the 3 districts of the city (currently called London 1, London 2, and London 3). Players create a sorcerer by selecting a clan, a specialty, and an origin (not the actual terms, but that is the theme of them). The demo version had 4 choices for each. Each one provides a single powerful ability that the player can use once per game as well as a set of cards (with the specialty providing about twice as many cards as each of the other two). The player shuffles these 3 sets of cards together to form their deck.

Each round of play consists of players alternating taking 1 action at a time. The available actions are:
* Draw 2 cards
* Regain 2 energy
* Play a card from your hand. Cards come in three types: spells, minions, and possessions. Spells are powerful, single use effects. Minions are evil soldiers that make up each sorcerers army. Each one must be played to one of the districts and each player can only have 4 minions per district. Possessions are powerful weapons that the sorcerer can arm a minion with. All of the cards cost between 1-6 energy to play.
* Move a minion from one district to an adjacent one or swap two minions in adjacent districts.
* Activate an ability of one of the cards that is in play. Each action would only activate an ability once, but the same ability could be used several times on the same turn.

Spending actions is the only way that a player could gain cards or energy, with one exception. At the beginning of each round, the priority (first) player would chose to either take 4 energy or roll an 8 sided die to determine an amount of energy to gain. In either case, his opponent also gets the same amount of energy.

After each player took 6 actions, the game moves on to combat. During the combat phase, the players contest each district in numerical order. Players take turns attacking with their minions one at a time, until all minions have either attacked once or have been killed and then move on to the next district. When attacking with a minion, a player rolls dice equal to that minions attack stat. Each dice has two a blank faces, two faces with single hit on them, one face with double hit on it, and one face with a critical hit on it. The defending player can assign each hit either to a minion in the district, up to that minions maximum health, or to the district itself. Crits are assigned to either a minion of the district by the attacking player and if there are no enemy minions to chose from, count as 2 hits on the city. Once a minion takes hits equal to its maximum health, it dies and is discarded. Once a location takes 13 hits from a single player that player wins that location and no further combat will take place in that district. Once a player wins two districts, they win the game.

At the end of combat, if no player has won, all damage taken by minions and locations is marked with counters and the game moves on to the next round. Priority is passed and players gain a bit of energy and start taking actions once again.

Overall, I enjoyed my play of the game, but I don't see myself getting it since it seems like a game that benefits from frequent play against opponents of similar skill, which I do not have. The biggest issues that jumped out at me is that an AP prone player could easily be overwhelmed by the number of possible plans and strategies. Also, since each players deck consists of a combination of 3 premade decks out of 12 (and that there are only 64 possible decks), I expect that experienced players will learn the capabilities of each deck and being able to count every card in their opponents deck will give them an overwhelming edge over their opponent. Also, the game as demoed to me, was not yet balanced well. I was able to win by summoning a minion that had great stats and gave me much more efficient action point usage (1 action point for 2 energy, 2 draws, and a reroll token). My opponent did not seem to have a good way to deal with a minion other than also summoning a high-stats minion to the same location. Unfortunately, I did have plenty of removal in my deck and since I had more cards than I could possibly use, I did not mind trading them to keep my super-minion alive.


And on the subject of the Hero Realms Campaign, I wrote:

Quote:
The gameplay is an evolution of Tibus, the Guild Lord (which is the same as Pirates of the Dark Star and Nemesis Beast from Star Realms). In every scenario that we were told about (all of the scenarios planned for the base game), players need to defeat a boss before the boss defeats all of them (or triggers and alternate loss condition). On each players turn, that player draws a card from the campaign deck (a separate deck from the trade deck that cards are bought from). Based on the color of that card, the boss does one of 4 attacks against that player. Most of the cards in that deck are enemy champions that are played in front of the player that drew them and attack that player at the start of each of that player's turns. Some of the cards are Elite Champions that stayed with the boss and attack each player at the start of his turn. There are also events that the boss can trigger. These will do a lot of damage to a player, undo some of the progress that players made, or otherwise hinder them. The final type of card in the deck is power up cards (not the correct name) that do nothing other than trigger a boss attack on their own, but once three are drawn, the boss powers up to its final form. This form had stronger attacks and could have players drawing even more campaign cards each turn.

On a player's turn, the player can buy cards as normal. They can attack enemies in front of them and, if there are none, they can also attack enemies in front of the player adjacent to them (with the boss breaking adjacency). If there are no guards in front of the player, the player can attack elite enemies and the boss. Health regeneration can now be given to adjacent players instead of yourself, but all health regeneration for a given turn must go to a single player (i.e. if you heal your neighbor, you cannot heal yourself with another ability later in the turn). Cards that make an opponent discard cards instead allow the player to look at the top card of the campaign deck and either put it back or discard it. Several of the character abilities were also changed. The thief once per game is now to buy one card at full price and get another card of the same faction and of the same or lower cost for free. The wizards once per turn now hits a group of enemies.

We got to play two scenarios. For the first scenario, I played the fighter with the other two players taking ranger and wizard. We needed to stop a tavern brawl that had been started by dark magic. Most of the enemies we fought were drunken patrons that dealt moderate damage (4-8 damage). We occasionally had to deal with overturned furniture that forced us to expend champions to clear out and an occasional damage spell from a shadowy figure. The enemies were never overwhelming and we generally dealt with what was in front of us each turn, but by the end, our remaining health was getting into the the mid-teens.

After we won the scenario, Randy explained the upgrade system. After each scenario, players deal a few cards out of a treasures deck and combine those with the unbought treasure from previous rounds to form a market. Each scenario awards 1 treasure point and points can be carried over from scenario to scenario to save up for bigger rewards. Since we were only going to get 1 chance to shop, Randy looked through the deck and showed us a couple of the treasures we could buy for 1 point. Most of them were minor potions that gave small boosts such as increasing a characters starting health by 4, getting an extra gold on the first turn, or getting to scrap one card out of a characters starting hand. He also showed us an item that we could add to our starting decks. If I recall correctly, the thief card was a knife belt item that allowed you to draw a card every time you played a throwing knife that turn, the ranger card was a quiver that let you take 2 arrows from your discard pile and add them to your hand, and the cleric item was a shield that could be given to a champion to give it +2 defense until it was next stunned.

For scenario two, one of the players had to leave, so Randy took over the ranger. I wanted to try out more classes, so I took the thief and the other player took the cleric. After stopping the brawl, the instigators split. We were given the option of either following an imp or a hooded figure. I did not care either way and the other player thought that the imp might be easier to kill, so we chose that scenario. Once we made our choice, Randy took most of the tavern specific cards out of the campaign deck and added in the Imp cards. Among them was an 'Target Escapes' card. The first time it is drawn, the card does nothing (other than triggering a boss attack) but the second time it is drawn, it is an immediate campaign loss. This time, the majority of enemies that we had to fight were imps that did not deal any damage, but instead forced us to discard a card with a given characteristic. Those enemies (and the Imp boss itself) did not deal us much damage, but they did stop a couple of really strong turns by forcing us to discard key cards. This scenario ended up being much easier because not as many cards in the deck actually dealt us damage, so we ended up killing the Imp a couple of turns after the first shuffle of his deck (the earliest that the escape card could have lost us the game). After finishing up the scenario, Randy told us that the next (and final) scenario would be a big boss fight against one of four demons (and the target that we pursued would not have changed what demons we could chose from).

Overall, I am very pleasantly surprised by the campaign. It has fun gameplay, a fair amount of variety, and a difficulty that made us nervous but did not kill us. The number of cards that we saw was higher than what the kickstarer ha promised. Randy confirmed that the number of cards that would be included has gone up significantly and that developing the larger game has thrown it off schedule. I think that the delay is worth it to get a better game (especially if backers are not asked to pay more for it).
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Martin
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As far as I can remember Rob said back in Essen the sweet spot to face those boss decks (dragon/lich) would be 3 heroes. They will scale depending on the hero count.

What's about the campaign?
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Roger the Alien wrote:
As far as I can remember Rob said back in Essen the sweet spot to face those boss decks (dragon/lich) would be 3 heroes. They will scale depending on the hero count.

What's about the campaign?


Not sure. Randy made it sound like 3 was one of the pain points for scaling and had us play with slightly modified rules (we did not draw any enemy cards during the first round so that we could get our decks going without getting too many enemies built up). I did not really see the value in that rules change since the character decks already have a decent amount of combat.
 
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