Recommend
7 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Necromunda» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Outlanders expansion review rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Ian Clark
United States
Loudon
New Hampshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Since the other reviews of the base game have covered everything nicely, I figured I would take a crack at the Outlanders expansion.

First, let me say that Necromunda was the first minis game I ever played, trying it with my Dad's gaming group when the game came out. I later got into Warhammer and 40k, but missed the smaller scale of Necromunda. I lucked out and picked up a brand new base set right off the shelf at a local game store despite the fact that the game had been out of print for several years. I have since collected full gangs (all minis produced) for the Orlocks, Goliaths, Delaque, Ratskins and Redemptionists, not to mention numerous other characters, bounty hunters, etc. This is a game I would never dream of selling off and is one I look forward to teaching my boys when they get older.

Outlanders was the lone expansion produced for the game and consisted of a new rule book and some terrain. The hardcover version of the Necromunda rulebook included not only the original rulebook and campaign book, but the Outlanders book as well. I own this hardcover and, although hefty and kind of clunky, I really like having all the rules under one cover.

Outlanders introduced new gangs (we'll get to that), new scenarios, new underhive hazards and the outlaw status and ways for bounty hunters to cash in on those scofflaws.

Let's look at the new gangs...

SCAVVIES: These are the mutated freaks of the underhive. They include scalies and plague zombies and the mutations (such as extra arms, claws, etc) make for some fun customizing options for those gamers who enjoy the modeling aspect of the hobby. I have not played the Scavvies so I cannot comment on their gameplay.

REDEMPTIONISTS: An offshoot of the Cawdor gang of the base game, the Redemtionists are realigious zealots. The Redemptionists have some of the cooler weapons (exclusive to them in many cases) in the game. Among the cool toys are eviscerators (massive chainsaws) and exterminators (a one-shot flamethrower mounted on regular rifles). This is one of my favorite gangs to play due to the colorful nature of the gang itself and the fun weapons.

RATSKINS: Available for hire individually as scouts, the Ratskins can also be played as a gang. They have a unique character type in the Shaman, a sort of wizard. They have lesser access to good weaponry, however, and I find them difficult to play with as a gang.

SPYRE HUNTERS: These are Spyre dwellers looking to prove themselves in the hive through combat. There are four houses, Jakara (lightly armed and agile), Yeld (winged flyers), Malcadon (trappers) and Orrus (power suits). I have not played with any spyres and cannot speak to their pros and cons.

The new hired guns include pit slaves (with exotic arm-replacement weapons like drills), wyrds (wizards of fire, telepaths, animal-controllers). There are also new special characters to hire like the Archzealot (Redemptionists only), Mad Donna (Escher), Bull Gorg, Brakat the Avenger (Ratskins) and Karloth Valois (scavvies).

There are also new creatures of the hive and rules for aliens like orks and Eldar.

Overall, the Outlanders expansion adds a lot to the Necromunda experience. I find the gangs in it to be more colorful than the base gangs (which really only differ in appearance and a the main traits they can advance in) and the outlaw/bounty hunter aspect is fun when you have a campaign with mixes of outlaws and regular gangs.

And the best news is that all of the Necromunda rules are on the Games Workshop specialist games website and are free to download.
1 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ken
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
badge
May I pass along my congratulations for your great interdimensional breakthrough. I am sure, in the miserable annals of the Earth, you will be duly enshrined. -- Lord John Whorfin
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Funny...I just pulled out my Van Saar gang to look at last night. Great game. Thanks for the review of the expansion.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Toco
Belgium
Oost-Vlaanderen
Vlaanderen
flag msg tools
designer
badge
www.tocoking.be/hotspot
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
jedigoalie wrote:
...

Overall, the Outlanders expansion adds a lot to the Necromunda experience. I find the gangs in it to be more colorful than the base gangs (which really only differ in appearance and a the main traits they can advance in) ...

You can use the rules for any setting with only very minor tweaks. The sky is the limit!

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice review from 2007. To help anyone first looking at Outlanders, all the Outland gangs were "officially" over-hauled by Specialists Games. So, each gang has two versions floating around on the I-Net.

The original versions of the gangs were very colorful, but generally considered overpowered compared to House Gangs (by the way, never re-done).

Spyers start with very powerful equipment and experience, will beat the heck out of a new-ish gang, and can dominate a campaign if unchecked.

Ratskins don't have overwhelming advantages, except immunity to Treacherous Conditions and enhanced resilience. This encourages the Ratskin player to always insist on Treacherous Conditions, which means the opponent is often fighting the Hive as much as the Ratskins. Opponents tend not to like that. Plus, over time, Ratskins do not degrade as much to injuries. Meanwhile, House Gangs may be retired and restarted due to injuries. An experienced Ratskin gang is pretty tough. Still, Ratskins are reasonably balanced, but the Treacherous Conditions thing leaves opponents frustrated.

Reddemptionist are too numerous, and have way too many flame templates. Great idea, poorly executed.

Scavvies have lot's of character, but the gang is flawed. It's too easy and tempting to have too many gangers, all of which can shoot and fight OK. Add in a dozen zombies, and a Scavvie gang just rolls over opponents. Plus, Zombies can cripple another gang. There is no compensating factor for having a large gang. In fact, despite their background, Scavvies are often the richest gang in a campaign. The only drawback is that Scavvies sort of plateau with experience and skills, mostly due to the expendable nature of its members. So, a new Scavvie gang can crush and cripple House gangs early in a campaign, but tends to sputter out latter against well experienced opponents. Meanwhile, in the middle of the campaign, opponents do not want to play against Scavvies because they do not want their promising gang exposed to crippling post-game effects. I've seen the Zombie Plague table destroy a decent gang.

All of these gangs are innovative and fun, and would have been great for one off games. But, they are too easy to abuse. The designers seemed to have forgotten that seriously beating up on opponents has long term consequences for the opponent's gang in a campaign.

The overhauled Outlander versions were an attempt to moderate the original gangs, with mixed success.

Spyers were toned down, while getting some new toys. They could not do some of the amazing things of the original gang. Their purpose in a campaign was redefined and is a little odd and confining. But, they can be fun for all.

Scavvies got seriously nerfed with entirely reactionary and artificial limits to their numbers and abilities. I would have gone in a different direction. If you never played the original rules, the newer rules would have puzzling limitations.

The new Redeemptionists are a mess. The new rules tried to be more thematic, but are confusing and don't match up with the available models. I think they were theoretical, rushed, and not actually play tested.

Don't know about Ratskins.

Enforcers were added, and they are OK.

These are my impressions, formed over a decade ago, and perhaps not perfectly remembered.
1 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls