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Subject: Team Trump thus far rss

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Chris Binkowski
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Enjoy! Discuss. Pontificate! Exfoliate!

Divine us the future based on these men's past. Conjure forth your prognostications.
 
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Sam I am
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non sequitur
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I made both of these fractals, hurray!
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yay I don't see cruz
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Christopher Seguin
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Sarxis wrote:


Enjoy! Discuss. Pontificate! Exfoliate!

Divine us the future based on these men's past. Conjure forth your prognostications.


After what happened last Tuesday, I have a strange feeling that prognosticators from the left may not beckon to your call.

However, they have been known to show less than stellar intelligence, so perhaps you will get some who will take your bait and pontificate.

Time will tell.
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Born To Lose, Live To Win
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I'm glad Giuliani didn't get AG, he's cra-cra.
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TheChin! wrote:
I'm glad Giuliani didn't get AG, he's cra-cra.


As long as he doesn't make him secretary of state which he was also being considered for. Corker would make more sense but he denies he's being considered seriously. Of course, then that leaves us with Haley (ugh) or Bolton (which will make the neo-cons pee their pants in happiness at all the money they get to spend on wars).
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Burke Martin
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she2 wrote:
TheChin! wrote:
I'm glad Giuliani didn't get AG, he's cra-cra.


As long as he doesn't make him secretary of state which he was also being considered for. Corker would make more sense but he denies he's being considered seriously. Of course, then that leaves us with Haley (ugh) or Bolton (which will make the neo-cons pee their pants in happiness at all the money they get to spend on wars).


Wait I thought they were against spending on more wars?

The only thing ive learned from this election is that the goal posts are now on wheels.
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brkmrtn wrote:
Wait I thought they were against spending on more wars?

The only thing ive learned is that the goal posts are now on wheels.
You are thinking about alleged-cons, she is talking about neo-cons. Neo-cons love spending on the military-complex and using all the toys they bought.
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James King
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Jeff Sessions: A Neo-Confederate's Confederate Who Not Only Defends The Confederate Flag But Also Its Ignoble Ideals


Sarxis wrote:


Enjoy! Discuss. Pontificate! Exfoliate!

Divine us the future based on these men's past. Conjure forth your prognostications.

Although Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions richly deserve each other since their racism is pretty much on par with one another, the nation at large doesn't deserve that Confederate pious pustule.


Jeff Sessions
A Neo-Confederate's Confederate Who Not Only Defends The Confederate Flag But Also Upholds Its Ignoble Legacy





In 1989, The Aubourn Journal wrote:
Jeff Sessions’ nomination to the Federal bench was rejected by the very same committee 20 ago for his making "racially insensitive" statements asserting that he thought that the Ku Klux Klan was "okay" until he found out they smoked "dope" and calling white civil rights lawyers "race traitors." Nor did it help Sessions when he admitted to routinely referring to an African-American attorney who worked for him as “boy” — even once warning that attorney to “be careful what you say to white folks!”

And it wasn’t just talk, either.

Sessions, it was disclosed, had a disturbing record of indicting black civil rights activists as US Attorney in Mobile, Alabama. Invariably the cases were later dismissed. He was also accused of not investigating the spate of black church burnings that swept the state of Alabama the year he became attorney general.

Sessions further injured his own reputation when he prosecuted a black couple who suggested in a news article that US Attorney Sessions may have been less than diligent during his investigation of a jail lynching of a black man accused of shoplifting.

During his own confirmation hearings, Sessions at first lied but later admitted that “I may have said something about the NAACP being un-American and Communist, but I meant nothing by it.”



The New Republic wrote:
Jeff Sessions was U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama. The year before his nomination to federal court, he had unsuccessfully prosecuted three civil rights workers, including Albert Turner, a former aide to Martin Luther King Jr., on a tenuous case of voter fraud. The three had been working in the “Black Belt” counties of Alabama, which, after years of voting white, had begun to swing toward black candidates as voter registration drives brought in more black voters. Sessions’s focus on these counties to the exclusion of others caused an uproar among civil rights leaders, especially after hours of interrogating black absentee voters produced only 14 allegedly tampered ballots out of more than 1,700,000 cast in the state in the 1984 election. The activists, known as the Marion Three, were acquitted in four hours and became a cause celebre. Civil rights groups charged that Sessions had been looking for voter fraud in the black community and overlooking the same violations among whites, at least partly to help re-elect his friend Senator Denton.

On its own, the case might not have been enough to stain Sessions with the taint of racism, but there was more. Senate Democrats tracked down a career Justice Department employee named J. Gerald Hebert, who testified, albeit reluctantly, that in a conversation between the two men Sessions had labeled the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) “un-American” and “Communist-inspired.” Hebert said Sessions had claimed these groups “forced civil rights down the throats of people.”

In his judicial confirmation hearings, Sessions sealed his own fate by saying such groups could be construed as “un-American” when “they involve themselves in promoting un-American positions” in foreign policy. Hebert testified that the young lawyer tended to “pop off” on such topics regularly, noting that Sessions had called a white civil rights lawyer a “disgrace to his race” for litigating voting rights cases. Sessions acknowledged making many of the statements attributed to him but claimed that most of the time he had been joking, saying he was sometimes “loose with [his] tongue.” He further admitted to calling the Voting Rights Act of 1965 a “piece of intrusive legislation,” a phrase he stood behind even in his confirmation hearings.




> Excerpts from the November 16, 2016 New York Times news story by Matt Apuzzo entitled:

Specter of Race Shadows Jeff Sessions, Potential Trump Nominee for Cabinet


Senator Jeff Sessions of Alabama, right, arriving at Trump Tower in Manhattan on Wednesday. He is seen as a strong contender for attorney general or secretary of defense in the Trump administration.

WASHINGTON — In 1981, a Justice Department prosecutor from Washington stopped by to see Jeff Sessions, the United States attorney in Mobile, Ala., at the time. The prosecutor, J. Gerald Hebert, said he had heard a shocking story: A federal judge had called a prominent white lawyer “a disgrace to his race” for representing black clients.

“Well,” Mr. Sessions replied, according to Mr. Hebert, “maybe he is.”

In testimony before Congress in 1986, Mr. Hebert and others painted an unflattering portrait of Mr. Sessions, who would go on to become a senator from Alabama and now, according to numerous sources close to President-elect Donald J. Trump’s transition team, is a potential nominee for attorney general or secretary of defense. Mr. Hebert testified that Mr. Sessions had referred to the American Civil Liberties Union and the N.A.A.C.P. as “un-American” for “trying to force civil rights down the throats of people.”

One African-American prosecutor testified that Mr. Sessions had called him “boy” and joked that he thought that the Ku Klux Klan “was O.K. until I found out they smoked pot.”

Mr. Sessions denied calling the lawyer “boy” but acknowledged or did not dispute the substance of the other remarks. The bitter testimony sank his nomination by President Ronald Reagan to be a federal district court judge and foreshadowed the questions that Mr. Sessions could face at another set of Senate confirmation hearings if Mr. Trump nominates him for a cabinet position.




Mr. Sessions testified in 1986 that he could not remember saying that a white lawyer might be a disgrace to his race for representing black clients. But he did not contest the allegation, made by a colleague.

After nearly 20 years in the Senate, Mr. Sessions, 69, now has more allies and would face a clearer road to confirmation than he did as a young judicial nominee. And as the first senator to endorse Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign, he has a special status as an early supporter who became an important surrogate and close adviser.

But for Mr. Trump a Sessions nomination to a critical position at the Justice or Defense Department still presents risks. Mr. Trump faced criticism over his derogatory remarks about Mexicans and his support from racist groups throughout his campaign, and for his appointment of a nationalist media executive to a top White House position since his election. A Sessions nomination raises the possibility that a Trump administration will open with racially charged hearings.

A spokesman for Mr. Sessions did not respond to a request for comment. But on Tuesday, Senator Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican who opposed Mr. Trump’s candidacy, enthusiastically endorsed Mr. Sessions for a major job in the Trump administration.

“I think Jeff Sessions has earned the right to serve Donald Trump in the highest levels,” he told reporters.

As attorney general, Mr. Sessions would be responsible for upholding civil rights laws. As secretary of defense, he would oversee one of the most ethnically diverse institutions in the country; 25% of the military is African-American, Asian, or Hispanic.

As one of the most conservative members of the Senate, Mr. Sessions has been a reliable voice for strict immigration enforcement, reduced spending and tough-on-crime measures. He is generally well liked among colleagues in both parties, and took a political risk endorsing Mr. Trump shortly after the South Carolina primary. His views on immigration and trade are aligned with the message that Mr. Trump conveyed during the race. Mr. Sessions has frequently traveled with Mr. Trump and was said at one point to be under consideration as the vice-presidential nominee.

Mr. Sessions has long considered it a personal triumph that he was elected to the Senate and became a member of the Judiciary Committee after that same panel rejected his nomination to the bench. Two Republicans joined Democrats in opposing his nomination. One of those Republicans, Senator Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, later said his vote had been a mistake — a fact that Mr. Sessions likes to point out.

But Mr. Sessions’ 1986 hearings were unusually rancorous, both for the era and for the position he was seeking. The sessions stretched for hours as Justice Department officials were called to testify about their colleague’s views on race. Mr. Sessions said his comment about the Klan was meant as "just a joke" and said it was so preposterous — especially since he was in the middle of prosecuting a case involving the group — that he thought nobody could take it seriously.

Sessions was less clear about his remarks about civil rights groups. Asked whether he ever said the N.A.A.C.P. hates white people or was “a Commie group and a pinko organization,” Mr. Sessions said he could not recall specifically saying that. “I am loose with my tongue on occasion, and I may have said something similar to that or could be interpreted to that,” he testified.

He went on to praise the N.A.A.C.P. for its work for racial equality in the South. He said he never called the group or the A.C.L.U. un-American, but added: “I said that they take positions that are considered un-American. They hurt themselves. They lose credibility. And many people do think that some of those positions they take are against the national interests of the United States.” Sessions said he was referring to "liberal immigration policies" and "support for the socialist Sandinista government in Nicaragua".



An African-American prosecutor, Thomas H. Figures, testified in 1986 that Jeff Sessions had called him “boy” when they worked together in Alabama. Mr. Sessions adamantly denied it.

At the Justice Department today, lawyers regard N.A.A.C.P. officials as partners in the fight for equal rights. “Laws alone do not guarantee justice, eradicate hate, or advance freedom,” Vanita Gupta, the Obama administration’s top civil rights prosecutor, told the group in July. “People do. People like you do. Organizations like the N.A.A.C.P. do.”

The N.A.A.C.P. also played a key role in fighting to integrate the military. The percentage of African-Americans in the military — now 17% — has grown steadily since President Harry S. Truman signed an order in 1948 that ended segregation in the armed forces.

Mr. Sessions also did not dispute Mr. Hebert’s recollection of their conversation about the white lawyer. He said he remembered the conversation, but not precisely what he said. “I guess I will not disagree with him,” Mr. Sessions testified, “and I do not know why — I cannot imagine why I would make that comment.”



Thomas H. Figures

An African-American prosecutor, Thomas H. Figures, testified that Mr. Sessions referred to him as “boy.” Once, after an argument with a secretary, “Mr. Sessions admonished me to ‘be careful what you say to white folks,’” Mr. Figures testified. Mr. Sessions denied saying that and was adamant that he had never called Mr. Figures “boy.”

Mr. Sessions had his supporters, including an Alabama judge, Ferrill D. McRae. “I have watched this young man since he started practicing law in Mobile,” Judge McRae wrote. “He is honest, hard-working, fair and compassionate for all his fellow man.”

In a phone interview on Wednesday, Mr. Hebert said it was a “frightening thought” that Mr. Sessions might lead the Justice Department. As for the Pentagon, he said, “His racial insensitivity might not be as manifest in such a position, but I wouldn’t feel good about it if I were a black soldier.”

Carl Hulse and Helene Cooper contributed reporting from Washington, and Maggie Haberman from New York.



> Excerpts from the November 17, 2016 Right Wing Watch news story by Brian Tashman entitled:

Trump Ally Jeff Sessions’ Alarming History Of Opposing Civil Rights

As a close ally and early supporter of President-elect Donald Trump, Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions has emerged as an early favorite to secure a spot in Trump’s cabinet, with recent speculation being that he will be nominated as U.S. Attorney General.

Sessions’ record on race is so alarming that it’s not at all surprising to see him on Trump's team.

Sessions defended Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims from entering the U.S. and Trump has embraced many of Sessions’ proposals, like “canceling federal funds to sanctuary cities,” slowing legal immigration and challenging the 14th Amendment’s guarantee of birthright citizenship. In January, a top aide to Sessions, Stephen Miller, joined the Trump campaign as senior policy adviser, and Sessions’ chief of staff Rick Dearborn is the executive director of Trump’s transition team.

Sessions’ record on race is so alarming that it’s not at all surprising to see him on Trump’s team.

In 1986, a bipartisan majority of the Senate Judiciary Committee rejected his nomination to a federal judgeship in the midst of charges of racial bias. For example, Sessions had criticized civil rights groups as “un-American” and “Communist-inspired” and accused them of trying to “force Civil Rights down the throats of people.” He also dubbed a white civil rights attorney a “disgrace to his race,” according to a witness, and reportedly called a black lawyer in his office “boy.” In his confirmation hearing, he admitted to referring to the Voting Rights Act as “a piece of intrusive legislation,” and he later opposed efforts to update the landmark law.

As The New Republic chronicled, Sessions prosecuted Civil Rights activists for trying to register black voters while saying that he only disapproved of the Ku Klux Klan after he “found out some of them were ‘pot smokers,’” a remark he later insisted was "just a joke".

Sessions was U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Alabama. The year before his nomination to federal court, he had unsuccessfully prosecuted three civil rights workers – including Albert Turner, a former aide to Martin Luther King Jr. – on a tenuous case of voter fraud. The three had been working in the “Black Belt” counties of Alabama, which, after years of voting white, had begun to swing toward black candidates as voter registration drives brought in more black voters.

Sessions’s focus on these counties to the exclusion of others caused an uproar among civil rights leaders, especially after hours of interrogating black absentee voters produced only 14 allegedly tampered ballots out of more than 1,700,000 cast in the state in the 1984 election. The activists, known as the Marion Three, were acquitted in four hours and became a cause célèbre. Civil Rights groups charged that Sessions had been looking for voter fraud in the black community and overlooking the same violations among whites, at least partly to help reelect his friend Senator Denton.




On its own, the case might not have been enough to stain Sessions with the taint of racism, but there was more. Senate Democrats tracked down a career Justice Department employee named J. Gerald Hebert, who testified, albeit reluctantly, that in a conversation between the two men Sessions had labeled the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) “un-American” and “Communist-inspired.” Hebert said Sessions had claimed these groups “forced Civil Rights down the throats of people.”

In his confirmation hearings, Sessions sealed his own fate by saying such groups could be construed as “un-American” when “they involve themselves in promoting un-American positions” in foreign policy. Hebert testified that the young lawyer tended to “pop off” on such topics regularly, noting that Sessions had called a white Civil Rights lawyer a “disgrace to his race” for litigating voting rights cases. Sessions acknowledged making many of the statements attributed to him but claimed that most of the time he had been joking, saying he was sometimes “loose with [his] tongue.” He further admitted to calling the Voting Rights Act of 1965 a “piece of intrusive legislation,” a phrase he stood behind even in his confirmation hearings.

It got worse. Another damaging witness – a black former assistant U.S. Attorney in Alabama named Thomas Figures – testified that, during a 1981 murder investigation involving the Ku Klux Klan, Sessions was heard by several colleagues commenting that he “used to think they [the Klan] were okay” until he found out some of them were “pot smokers.”

Sessions claimed the comment was clearly said in jest. Figures didn’t see it that way. Sessions, he said, had called him “boy” and, after overhearing him chastise a secretary, warned him to “be careful what you say to white folks.” Figures echoed Hebert’s claims, saying he too had heard Sessions call various Civil Rights organizations, including the National Council of Churches and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, “un-American.” Sessions denied the accusations but again admitted to frequently joking in an off-color sort of way. In his defense, he said he was not a racist, pointing out that his children went to integrated schools and that he had shared a hotel room with a black attorney several times.











Other Suggested Reading Via Clickable News-Story Links

Trump Supporter Jeff Sessions Declares: "Keep Secular Mindset Off The Supreme Court"

Trump Supporter Jeff Sessions Declares: "My Immigration Position Is The Biblical One"

Trump Supporter Jeff Sessions Declares: "There've Been No Major Hurricanes In 10 Years, Thank The Lord"

If You’ve Smoked Pot, This Senator Doesn’t Think You Are A Good Person

Rudy Giuliani and Jeff Sessions Wore "Make Mexico Great Again Also" Caps at a Donald Trump Rally

Phyllis Schlafly Praises Jeff Sessions, Trump & Cruz And Warns Republican "Kingmakers"

Sessions Defends Trump On Muslim Ban, Says It's "Appropriate To Begin To Discuss This"

Jeff Sessions: "Gay Couples Could Just Call Themselves Married And Don’t Need Legal Recognition"

Rick Perry, Ron Johnson And Jeff Sessions To Join Anti-Muslim Activists At Florida Beach Resort Confab

"Anti-Immigrant" Jeff Sessions and Alabama's Racist Voter ID Law

Jeff Sessions's Checkered Past

Jeff Sessions on Confederate Flag Flap: "It Is Not Appropriate For Us To Erase History"

GOP Politicians Rejecting Refugees Sound Like Racist Internet Trolls

The U.S. Senator Who Praised Segregationist Judges Will Lead Opposition To Obama's Supreme Court Nominees

A Senate Vote on Donald Trump's Religious Test

Senator Jeff Sessions Declares: "The removal of the Confederate Flag from the Statehouses of southern states is an attempt to delegitimize fabulous accomplishments"


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Kelsey Rinella
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Sarxis wrote:


Enjoy! Discuss. Pontificate! Exfoliate!

Divine us the future based on these men's past. Conjure forth your prognostications.


I will be disappointed in my government for four years. Those who voted for Trump claiming it was to reduce Washington corruption and create many manufacturing jobs will get little or none of what they said they wanted, but many of them will mysteriously still support him at the end of his term.
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Terwox wrote:
yay I don't see cruz


Trump isn't announcing the next member of the Supreme Court yet.
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J.D. Hall
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I am confident Jeff Sessions will heal the racial divide creating by the racist Obama administration.
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Re: Team Trump thus far C.R.O.N.Y. TRIO
C.R.O.N.Y. = "Corrupt Republican Official Nefariously Yield" + TRIO shown.
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Lindsey Graham Floats Ted Cruz For Supreme Court


jageroxorz wrote:
Terwox wrote:
yay I don't see cruz

Trump isn't announcing the next member of the Supreme Court yet.

And "Yet" is the key operating word here, too.


> Excerpts from the November 15, 2016 Huffington Post news story by Marina Fang & Ryan Grim entitled:

Lindsey Graham Floats Ted Cruz For Supreme Court



WASHINGTON ― South Carolina Republican U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham who once joked about murdering Texas Republican U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, suggested Tuesday that President-elect Donald Trump could nominate Cruz to the Supreme Court.

Speaking to reporters on Capitol Hill, Graham, a strong Trump critic, said one positive in Trump’s election victory was the prospect of conservative Supreme Court appointments.

“I added a name to the list: Senator Cruz. I think he’d get a lot of votes,” Graham said.

Cruz and Graham both unsuccessfully opposed Trump for the 2016 GOP presidential nomination. Trump got especially personal with Cruz, branding him “Lyin’ Ted.”

In February, Graham noted Cruz’s deep unpopularity among his Senate colleagues, joking that “if you killed Ted Cruz on the floor of the Senate, and the trial was in the Senate, nobody would convict you.”

Cruz, a former Supreme Court clerk, has repeatedly said that he doesn’t want to serve on the court. He gave a speech that failed to endorse Trump at the Republican National Convention, but surrendered in September after Trump expanded his list of Supreme Court candidates and committed to only choosing from those names. Cruz is not among those on the list.

On Tuesday, Cruz was spotted at Trump Tower, where he met with Trump “to offer aid” to the President-elect’s transition team, according to Trump aides. After the meeting, Cruz wouldn’t say if he was interested in serving in Trump’s administration.

Graham said on Tuesday that he believes Trump’s list of candidates to replace the late Antonin Scalia are “all good choices,” but expects “a challenging confirmation process.”


 
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jageroxorz wrote:
Terwox wrote:
yay I don't see cruz


Trump isn't announcing the next member of the Supreme Court yet.


I hold to my prediction he will consider his sister for the position.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryanne_Trump_Barry

(I'm joking; she's a senior judge so I doubt they'd pick someone as old as her)
 
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Right wing nutty: Michael Flynn
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2016/09/15...

Colin Powell at least isn't overly impressed with Michael.

"Powell, who was the Pentagon’s top general from 1989 to 1993, called Flynn a “jerk” at least once in his emails, and said he heard the retired three-star officer was forced out as the head of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) in 2014."

etc
etc

Sometimes the press actually do their job.
 
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Pinook wrote:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2016/09/15...

Colin Powell at least isn't overly impressed with Michael.

"Powell, who was the Pentagon’s top general from 1989 to 1993, called Flynn a “jerk” at least once in his emails, and said he heard the retired three-star officer was forced out as the head of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) in 2014."

etc
etc

Sometimes the press actually do their job.

And that's exactly what Trumpistas resent most: that the press does it job by acting like watchdogs and calling Trump for his many lies, exaggerations, and misinformation.


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Feeling like I was on a roll after Flynn I had a quick look at the new CIA DIrector designate.
Seems an ideal choice for the job if you want spooks crawling out of your free Amercan arse at unexpected moments day or night. A curious blend of Tea Party and pro mass surveillance

But who knows maybe he'll be great too.

Go Caesar and Pompey!
 
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Koldfoot wrote:
Forced out for using the term Muslim terrorist.

He was apparently warned not to use the term.


Whence yiur clarity that it wasn't because he was a jerk and right wing nutty as per Powell?
 
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rinelk wrote:
...I will be disappointed in my government for four years. Those who voted for Trump claiming it was to reduce Washington corruption and create many manufacturing jobs will get little or none of what they said they wanted, but many of them will mysteriously still support him at the end of his term.


With respect to reducing corruption in Washington, Trump voters have already achieved much of what they wanted simply by keeping Clinton out of the White House!
 
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Koldfoot wrote:
Forced out for using the term Muslim terrorist.

He was apparently warned not to use the term.

False analysis. Gen. Michael Lynne essentially alleged that ALL MUSLIMS are to be suspected of being terrorists and made no distinction between the militant Wahabi extremists and mainstream Islam.

ISIS has had no ambivalence about who it wanted in the Oval Office. The more anti-Muslim, bigoted, and polarizing the President, the better from their perspective that candidate would be for their recruiting efforts because they'd be given plenty of propaganda ammo from such a worthy. Also, it's not for nothing that ISIS kills civilians and boasts of brutality. Polarization has always been one of its key strategic objectives, a way to rupture societies into binary shadows of their former selves. A Trump Presidency is a big step in that direction.

ISIS is already having a field day exploiting video of Trump's appearances and his Twitter comments for their own recruitment purposes.


> Excerpts from the November 14, 2016 Reuters news story by Ahmad Sultan & Omar Fahmy entitled:

Trump's Terror Boost
Jihadists vow to use Donald Trump’s shock-election win to entice new fightera as even ISIS commander brands him a "complete maniac"
The brash Republican previously called for a "total shutdown" of Muslim immigration to the USA


Jihadists are planning to use Donald Trump’s shock U.S. Presidential victory as a propaganda tool to bring new fighters to their battlefields.

Taliban commanders and ISIS supporters say Trump’s campaign trail rhetoric against Muslims will play perfectly in their recruitment efforts, especially for disaffected youth in the West.

The billionaire, giving his first TV interview since being voted as President-elect, is allegedly being used as an extremist propaganda tool
During his divisive presidential campaign, the Republican called for a "total shutdown" of Muslim immigration to the United States.

“This guy is a complete maniac. His utter hate towards Muslims will make our job much easier because we can recruit thousands,” Abu Omar Khorasani, a top IS commander in Afghanistan, told Reuters.

Trump has talked tough against militant groups on the campaign trail, promising to defeat “radical Islamic terrorism just as we won the Cold War.”

The President-elect later toned down his call for a total ban on Muslim entry to say he would temporarily suspend immigration from countries that have “a history of exporting terrorism.”

But Trump has offered few details on his plans to combat various radical groups, including ISIS, the Taliban and al Qaeda, which represent a wide spectrum of political views.

“Trump does not differentiate between extremist and moderate Islamist trends and, at the same time, he overlooks [the fact] that his own extremism will generate extremism in return,” Iraq’s powerful Shi’ite Muslim cleric Moqtada al-Sadr said in a statement.

Sadr’s political reform movement, which commands thousands of followers, is a staunch opponent of the radical Sunni movements ISIS and al Qaeda, and unlike them, has not waged or promoted attacks in the West.

U.S. officials have warned the country will likely face a higher risk of similar attacks as ISIS urges supporters to launch attacks at home instead of joining its fight in the Middle East.

"Our leaders were closely following the U.S. election, but it was unexpected that the Americans will dig their own graves, and they did so," said ISIS's Khorasani, who described President Barack Obama as a "moderate infidel with at least a little brain in comparison to Trump".

Al Qaeda, which has proven resilient more than 15 years after launching the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and the Pentagon, has yet to comment on Trump's victory.

The militant group will likely respond after Trump's first speeches as president, anticipating they will be able to exploit his comments to win support, said Hisham al Hashemi, who advises the Iraqi government on Sunni jihadist movements.

"Al Qaeda is known for its recruitment strategy that heavily quotes speeches of the White House and other Western officials," he told Reuters.

Trump's office did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the statements from the militants.

Even if Trump tones down his anti-Muslim comments when he takes office in January, analysts say that the 18 months of anti-Muslim statements that he made on the campaign trail were enough to fuel the militants' propaganda machine for years to come.

"Militants will still use those quotes," said Matthew Henman, head of IHS Jane's Terrorism and Insurgency Centre. "The key thing militant groups, particularly Islamic State and al Qaeda, depend on for recruitment purposes is convincing Muslims in the Western world that the West hates them and won't ever accept them as part of their society."

A senior Taliban commander in Afghanistan said the group, whose resurgence is undermining efforts to end America's longest war, had kept track of all of Trump's speeches and anti-Muslim comments.

"If he does what he warned in his election campaign, I am sure it will provoke Muslim Ummah (community) across the world and jihadi organizations can exploit it," said the militant leader, who declined to be identified because of strict Taliban policy that only its official spokesman can make statements.

Shortly after Trump's victory, several jihadist sympathisers took to social media to declare this as an opportunity for their cause.

"The dog Trump's victory in the U.S. elections is a gold mine for Muslims not a setback if they know how to use it," tweeted @alhlm200, who regularly posts statements in support of Islamic State.

And in Algeria, @salil_chohada, an Islamic State supporter whose name on the Twitter account is Mohamed Aljazairie, said: "Congratulations to the Muslim nation over the infidel Trump's victory. His stupid statements alone serve us."


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Matthew Schoell
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deadkenny wrote:
rinelk wrote:
...I will be disappointed in my government for four years. Those who voted for Trump claiming it was to reduce Washington corruption and create many manufacturing jobs will get little or none of what they said they wanted, but many of them will mysteriously still support him at the end of his term.


With respect to reducing corruption in Washington, Trump voters have already achieved much of what they wanted simply by keeping Clinton out of the White House!


Except that you are getting everything you say you hated in Clinton.

Trump just spent 25 million settling a massive fraud case in which he ran a fake university.

And you get misuse of charity dollars as he repeatedly used Trump Foundation dollars.

And you get massive cronyism as Trump appoints blatantly unqualified individuals to major posts while he lets his son-in-law pursue a vendetta.

We, of course, get to clean up the mess in our communities, as not only do we get the standard Republican message of "you can blame all the brown people for your woes" we also get a direct "attaboy" from the White House to every racist hate group this country has ever known.

And you're going to get what out of this? You think someone will pay an unskilled American worker to make a widget on a line once we deport? You think your health insurance premiums will go down? You think when Trump orders a surprise attack on a Muslim town where ISIS is hiding it won't become a recruitment tool?
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Jage
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Still better than Clinton!
 
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Oh my God They Banned Kenny
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Doc Mage wrote:
deadkenny wrote:
rinelk wrote:
...I will be disappointed in my government for four years. Those who voted for Trump claiming it was to reduce Washington corruption and create many manufacturing jobs will get little or none of what they said they wanted, but many of them will mysteriously still support him at the end of his term.


With respect to reducing corruption in Washington, Trump voters have already achieved much of what they wanted simply by keeping Clinton out of the White House!


Except that you are getting everything you say you hated in Clinton.....


You are about as on target as those of the left were regarding the election result itself.

Clinton is out, and that is a big win in and of itself. Your left wing spinning is totally irrelevant. But do keep on spinning. The more you squirm the funnier it makes you look.
 
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Welcome Rolling Stones
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Looks like 3 turds in a toilet bowl.
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