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Subject: Board games that have elements of "X-Ray vision" rss

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joshua robinson
United Kingdom
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Hello everyone

I am currently at university studying Computer Games Design and I am tasked with doing an essay on non digital mechanics and their digital counterparts, i have decided to talk about the X-Ray vision feature that is used in some games today for example Mafia 3, sniper elite 2 and 3, watch dogs, Batman: Arkham series (Detective Mode).

are there any board games out there that use some part maybe even use the full feature in board games today if so what are they called and what elements of it does it involve and in what way for example via card or rule set

Hope you can help

Josh
 
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To state the obvious, it's very hard for a physical game to simulate a feature like this. The closest I can think of right away is Black Box, a classic deduction game from the 70s.

One player 'hides' silver balls on a grid, the other fires 'rays' in from a side of the grid. The first player puts markers down to show how the ray responds, that is, how it deviates its path according to the location of the hidden balls. By seeing how a ray enters and exits the grid, the second player can deduce the location of the balls. It's a very clever design once players are familiar with the rules of the rays movements.

Of course, this is not looking through walls type stuff, but as an early example, it's a clever method for finding hidden objects. The game is regularly re-issued, you should be able to find a copy (especially in charity shops).

I hope this helps.
 
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Leo Chell
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Gloom Uses see through card so that you can see the stats and text on lower cards so that they still count.
 
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To follow on, there's a recent JPgame called Vampire Radar. One player is a vampire, invisible to the other players (humans). The humans move around and fire off a radar gun in the hope of deducing the vampire's location. The humans want to kill the vampire with a silver bullet before he kills them. Again, not looking through walls, but using information to deduce hidden location.

To follow that thought, there's a vast raft of games using hidden movement and deduction, typically asymmetric games of one vs many:
Scotland Yard (the classic example, now bettered)
The Fury of Dracula
Garibaldi: The Escape
Nuns on the Run (notable because the many are the hidden)
Letters from Whitechapel (notable because the hidden's exact starting point is always known)

as examples. But these work on deducing location by finding clues and working out the targets movements as a result. So they probably don't serve your purpose. Still, fore-warned is fore-armed.
 
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Eric Nolan
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Boardgames have more or less the reverse issue. When you move a counter around on the board then everyone can see it regardless of whether their forces have line of sight.

Space Hulk addresses this by using blips. The genestealer player moves counters that represent 0-3 units so the marine player never knows exactly what they are facing and may actually be defending against something that doesn't exist. Various block wargames (eg: Crusader Rex) use blocks, where the side with the unit details only faces the owner, instead of counters.

In games which have hidden information about units on the map, like those two examples, there can be abilities that allow a player to do something like look at one enemy unit or look at another players hand of cards.

So, in video games by default you don't know what is going on unless you can see it directly and there are mechanisms which allow you to do this. In boardgames by default you do know everything about the units in play and there are mechanisms to change this, generally referred to as introducing a Fog of Battle.
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Hivemind wrote:
Various block wargames (eg: Crusader Rex) use blocks, where the side with the unit details only faces the owner, instead of counters.


Stratego is another example of this. There's a more recent game with mirrors on the pieces, so when I move my piece behind yours, I can see the reverse of your pieces, but I forget the name. Something with princesses I think.
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Larry L
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Some later editions of Rat-a-Tat Cat use red plastic lens goggles that are worn to read info on the back of cards. My guess is that other children's games do this too.
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