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Subject: Spelling and grammar question for native english speakers rss

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Thomas Verstraete
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I just received a draft for an invitation.

One of the sentences consists of the following :"...in the worlds finest city of Paris."

I have the feeling that there are one or two mistakes in this phrase but I want to verify this and thought that maybe this forum could help me out.

I have some doubts about the word "worlds", I think this should be "world's".

Also, I have some doubts about the phrase as a whole. I know it is not uncommon to use "the city of..." But when preceded by "in the worlds finest" it just sounds wrong. But this is just a feeling.

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Josh
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I'd probably go with "... in the world's finest city, Paris."

The apostrophe is necessary.

I wonder if anyone would argue for the comma to be replaced by a colon.
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JoshBot wrote:
I wonder if anyone would argue for the comma to be replaced by a colon.


I like your rephrasing much better.

An argument could be made for using a colon (I would probably have used it myself), but the comma works just as well. As long as the sentence is understandable and there is no ambiguity about what is meant, it's author's choice.
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TonyKR
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JoshBot wrote:
I'd probably go with "... in the world's finest city, Paris."

Agreed.

JoshBot wrote:
The apostrophe is necessary.

Agreed.

JoshBot wrote:
I wonder if anyone would argue for the comma to be replaced by a colon.

I wouldn't use a colon, but an argument could be made for an em dash (or en dash if that's the local style preference).
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melchett wrote:


I just received a draft for an invitation.

One of the sentences consists of the following :"...in the worlds finest city of Paris."

I have the feeling that there are one or two mistakes in this phrase but I want to verify this and thought that maybe this forum could help me out.

I have some doubts about the word "worlds", I think this should be "world's".

Also, I have some doubts about the phrase as a whole. I know it is not uncommon to use "the city of..." But when preceded by "in the worlds finest" it just sounds wrong. But this is just a feeling.

Yep you are right on both counts.

It is world's because the apostrophe indicates possessive case.

Yes you sometimes do hear the phrase "city of ..." but IMO that usage cannot go together with the possessive clause before it.
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Thomas Verstraete
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Thanks everyone, for this quick response.
Gotta love this forum, or to rephrase it... the world's finest forum, bgg.
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shumyum
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I WOULD rephrase the sentence to: "In Paris, the world's finest city."

BUT it calls attention more to the fact that the sentence is false.

Have you thought about changing it to Sheboygan?
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melchett wrote:
I have some doubts about the word "worlds", I think this should be "world's".


Worlds (no apostrophe) is plural; more than one world is worlds.

World's is possessive. Something belongs to it. "The world's food supply."

The only other time that "apostrophe S" is allowed on the end of a noun is when you are using it as a contraction-- something is. The apostrophe always replaces a missing letter (or letters), in this case the I in is.

World's = World is
"The world's going to hell in a handbasket." (I have pulled an English idiom out of nowhere, but it shows the point that I'm --I am-- making.)

The use of the contraction there is a sloppy way of speaking, however, and I think that most people would ignore the contraction in that sentence and say "The world is..".
Usually we reserve the 's contraction for pronouns (e.g. she's) and negative statements (don't or can't)

But it is common on nouns; thus:

The world's going to hell in a handbasket because we almost need two worlds to produce this world's food supply, just so we could adequately support this world's population.

"Advanced" concepts--

The possessive of the pronoun "it" is "its" and NOT "it's". You wouldn't write it'self for itself, would you?
It's is always a contraction meaning "it is". ALWAYS!!

Placing an apostrophe after an S is the possessive form of a plural.
So you can have "lawyers", more than one lawyer, and you can have "lawyers' fees", which are the fees of (possessive) more than one lawyer.

So: No apostrophe = plural, except for the pronoun it.

The 1970s (no apostrophe, no contraction. There is nothing missing, and the term is the plural years from 1970 - 1979.)

The '70s (the apostrophe replaces the numbers "19", so it is a valid use. Note that there is still no apostrophe s on the end of '70s.)

For family names
Mr. Clark and Mrs. Clark become The Clarks. More than one Clark; therefore, no apostrophe.
Mr. Jones and Mrs. Jones become The Joneses. Same principle as Clarks above. NO APOSTROPHES!
A car belongs to Mr. Jones. It is Mr. Jones's car. Possessive = 's.
The house belongs to Mr. and Mrs. Jones: It is the Joneses' house.
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I like the phrasing "in the world's finest city of Paris."

It's a little bit odd, but has a nice rhythm to it. "in the world's finest city, Paris," by comparison, sounds kind of clunky.
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Bryan Thunkd
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wmshub wrote:
I like the phrasing "in the world's finest city of Paris."

It's a little bit odd, but has a nice rhythm to it. "in the world's finest city, Paris," by comparison, sounds kind of clunky.
Without setting off Paris as a separate thing, we're not talking about the world's finest city. We're talking about the world's finest "City of Paris". That could be Paris, KY or Paris, ID. And while Paris, France is almost certainly the world's finest "city of Paris" that's less of an accomplishment than being the world's finest city.
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shumyum wrote:
I WOULD rephrase the sentence to: "In Paris, the world's finest city."



This is my vote!
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Erik D
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melchett wrote:
Thanks everyone, for this quick response.
Gotta love this forum, or to rephrase it... the world's finest forum, bgg.


You should probably capitalize BGG.
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Barry Harvey
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shumyum wrote:
I WOULD rephrase the sentence to: "In Paris, the world's finest city."

BUT it calls attention more to the fact that the sentence is false.

Have you thought about changing it to Sheboygan?

If there's one thing that the first draft of Casablanca has taught us, it's that the line "We'll always have Sheboygan" was never going to work.
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Thunkd wrote:
wmshub wrote:
I like the phrasing "in the world's finest city of Paris."

It's a little bit odd, but has a nice rhythm to it. "in the world's finest city, Paris," by comparison, sounds kind of clunky.
Without setting off Paris as a separate thing, we're not talking about the world's finest city. We're talking about the world's finest "City of Paris". That could be Paris, KY or Paris, ID. And while Paris, France is almost certainly the world's finest "city of Paris" that's less of an accomplishment than being the world's finest city.

Yes, this. "The world's finest city of Paris" is referring to the finest city out of all the cities of Paris around the world, which is highly unlikely to be what the writer really intends to be talking about. That's what's still wrong after you add the apostrophe.
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The of is interesting when applied to London. "London" and "the City of London" refer to different places.

London is a multi-million inhabitant large sprawling city. The City of London refers to a small part of it, once within the Roman walls, often referred to as "the square mile" with a resident population of only a few thousand but a lot of banks and other institutions. Some of the things London is famous for - like the Tower of London, St. Paul's Cathedral and even the Bank of London - are in the City. But most aren't. Some are in the other city in London, Westminster.
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"... in Paris, the finest city in all the worlds of the universe."
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Dearlove wrote:
Some of the things London is famous for - like the Tower of London, St. Paul's Cathedral and even the Bank of London - are in the City.


Think you had a minor "senior moment" here. You mean, of course, Bank of England (the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street)
Almost nobody has ever heard of the Bank of London as it ceased to exist 150-ish years ago.
The Bank of London and The Middle East exists as do one or two other similarly named organisations – but few will have heard of those† either.

† another grammatical question - I understand that "those" is technically correct here but most native speakers of English would use "them"
 
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Bryan Thunkd
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andyholt wrote:
The Bank of London and The Middle East exists as do one or two other similarly named organisations – but few will have heard of those† either.

† another grammatical question - I understand that "those" is technically correct here but most native speakers of English would use "them"
"Those" sounds slightly better to me, but either would be acceptable to my ear.

"Exists" should be "exist" however. A singular thing exists, multiple things exist.
 
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Andy Holt
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Thunkd wrote:
andyholt wrote:
The Bank of London and The Middle East exists as do one or two other similarly named organisations – but few will have heard of those† either.

† another grammatical question - I understand that "those" is technically correct here but most native speakers of English would use "them"
"Those" sounds slightly better to me, but either would be acceptable to my ear.

"Exists" should be "exist" however. A singular thing exists, multiple things exist.


The Bank of London and The Middle East is a singular entity so I was correct in my usage. I should, perhaps, have used italics in the original posting to make matters clear.
 
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Christopher Dearlove
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andyholt wrote:
Dearlove wrote:
Some of the things London is famous for - like the Tower of London, St. Paul's Cathedral and even the Bank of London - are in the City.


Think you had a minor "senior moment" here. You mean, of course, Bank of England (the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street)
Almost nobody has ever heard of the Bank of London as it ceased to exist 150-ish years ago.
The Bank of London and The Middle East exists as do one or two other similarly named organisations – but few will have heard of those† either.

† another grammatical question - I understand that "those" is technically correct here but most native speakers of English would use "them"


Yes, Bank of England.
 
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wrote:
goo If there's one thing that the first draft of Casablanca has taught us, it's that the line "We'll always_no longer have Sheboygan since some CREATURE-"wrecked`em"/pertnear DESTROYED there!" was never going to work.
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jbrecken wrote:
"... in Paris, the finest city in all the worlds of the universe."


Just my thought. And in this case we could use "worlds'" to demonstrate plural possessive too! laugh
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Is being the finest city a compliment? Wouldn't greatest, or most beautful be better?

"How is Paris?" "Oh, it's fine." So if Paris is the "finest", it's the "most fine", which is still OK, but not spectacular

(Yes, I kid...)
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wow "MERRY Thanksgiving!" from where it is NOT "crap"-town, yore welcome.
 
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