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Subject: Timed games? Blitz? Suggestions needed rss

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David Barlowe
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Can someone share ideas on how to play go with a chess clock? What are the popular timings for speed games?

I play a lot of 5-minute and 15-minute chess with friends.

Appreciate any suggestions for go.
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Stefano Adriani
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Calolziocorte (LC) - Ispra (VA)
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Premise: I think this is one of the best site for playing on line

https://online-go.com

assuming this, and using it as reference, I'd say that this is the most populare approach for blitz game:

- Normal play time for player: from 5 to 10 minutes
- Extra time for player: after having finished the normal time, usually each player has other 5 "turn" of about 10-30 seconds. As long as the player manages to move before this time (i.e. 10-30 seconds) he can play forever. But when he run out of these 5 "turn" his time ends.

Of course this regards just some common pratices for playing on-line, I have no idea if there are different practices when playing live.
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Virre Linwendil Annergård
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There is many variations used for Go, I recommend to start with the Senseis Libary page that list the different variants

http://senseis.xmp.net/?TimeSystems

--

Also based on the chess preference you might want blitz games

http://senseis.xmp.net/?BlitzGames
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David Barlowe
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Thank you very much, I'll explore and report back.
 
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Kory Stevens
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If you actually want to use a physical chess clock for keeping time in a game, typically the canadian timing system is best. For other byo-yomi systems you usually need to get a special clock, but canadian time was basically invented to be used by clubs that wanted to just use chess clocks.
 
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Jean-Luc Luyet
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If you have a physical clock, the best idea is to use what is called "Canadian Byo-yomi". It goes like this:

- each player has a given "main time" (e.g. 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, ...)
- after this main time is used. The player "enters" his byo-yomi.

The byo-yomi is something like X stones in Y minutes (e.g. 15 stones in 5 minutes). The player who enters byo-yomi pick X stones and put them ready to play before him. It is usually a good idea to cover the bowl of stones to be sure he will not be tempted to take a stone from the bowl. While he is preparing his X stones, the other player can prepare the clock to Y minutes.

Then, play continues.

If the player in byo-yomi cannot play all his X stones during the Y minutes, he has lost on time. Otherwise, as soon as he has played his X-th stone, both players stop, and prepare a new byo-yomi period like before (setting X stones ready, resetting the clock for this player to Y minutes).

Note: if a player pass while in byo-yomi, he should take one of his X stones and put it back in the bowl (since the other player might not want to pass and still keep playing, it is important to keep the count of moves).

Standard time settings with this method are:
15 minutes main time + 25 stones in 5 minutes (very fast, blitz)
30 minutes main time + 20 stones in 5 minutes (still fast, but typical if played between friends or at a club)
1 hour main time + 15 stones in 5 minutes (very often used in amateur tournaments)
...
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K T
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I second this comment. I am a big fan of:
https://online-go.com

You can play it on your mobile without having to download anything. I've played on PandaNet as well as KGS. I like both of their communities, but I have been waiting for a browser-friendly system, that could be played easily on mobile. Online-go is the best for that.

In terms of times, I think the comments in the thread are pretty good. I personally think Fischer Timing is the most rational. However, it seems to me that most players are used to the Japanese Byo-yomi System.

Depending on your rank / level, you may find the definition of fast and slow to also be different. Casual players may not spend as much time thinking about their moves, compared to serious players.

Best of luck!
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Daniel Piovezan
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Another OGS player here! I like it though I haven't played much elsewhere to compare.

newvariant wrote:
I personally think Fischer Timing is the most rational. However, it seems to me that most players are used to the Japanese Byo-yomi System.

Agreed, and agreed. You should at least know how byo-yomi works, cause it's popular. But for a chess clock, I recommend a Fischer setting. For regular speed, 2 minutes start plus 30 seconds per move. For blitz, 30 seconds start plus 10 seconds per move. That's the standard at OGS, if I recall, and it works regardless of board size, unlike byo-yomi.
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David Barlowe
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These last three comments are perfect, exactly the perspective I was hoping to hear. Thank you!

I've played about 10 games, mostly 9-9 / 13 x 13, with my regular gaming partner, snd we are thunking about a clock. We've started reading more, using some of the reasources mentuoned.
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Bryan Thunkd
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Phuntom wrote:
These last three comments are perfect, exactly the perspective I was hoping to hear. Thank you!

I've played about 10 games, mostly 9-9 / 13 x 13, with my regular gaming partner, snd we are thunking about a clock. We've started reading more, using some of the reasources mentuoned.
If you don't already own a chess clock, I'd look into a clock that can handle standard byo-yomi as well. I'm pretty sure you can find one for about $50.
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Kris Boyen
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BozoDel wrote:
Another OGS player here! I like it though I haven't played much elsewhere to compare.

newvariant wrote:
I personally think Fischer Timing is the most rational. However, it seems to me that most players are used to the Japanese Byo-yomi System.

Agreed, and agreed. You should at least know how byo-yomi works, cause it's popular. But for a chess clock, I recommend a Fischer setting. For regular speed, 2 minutes start plus 30 seconds per move. For blitz, 30 seconds start plus 10 seconds per move. That's the standard at OGS, if I recall, and it works regardless of board size, unlike byo-yomi.


Fisher is certainly not the most used timing mechanism in go. Japanese byo-yomi is more common, and I don't see a problem using it with any board size. The main difference is that with Fisher, you can build up extra time, while with the more common used ones in go, you can't. More info on the senseis library page referenced above.
 
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Ramon Mercado
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Djaian wrote:
If you have a physical clock, the best idea is to use what is called "Canadian Byo-yomi".


Personally I'm a fan of Canadian, however in the US the most common time use for tournaments is Japanese Byo-yomi. I would suggest you use that instead, to get more familiar with the time management.
 
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Bryan Thunkd
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Karian wrote:
Fisher is certainly not the most used timing mechanism in go. Japanese byo-yomi is more common, and I don't see a problem using it with any board size. The main difference is that with Fisher, you can build up extra time, while with the more common used ones in go, you can't. More info on the senseis library page referenced above.
Fischer time encourages you to make a couple of really quick moves to build up time so that you can have a bank to use later on. So you might invade a corner so that you can play out a joseki where the moves are rote and don't require thought.

If you're playing byo-yomi, you can't bank time, you simply have a period of time (usually 30 seconds) that you have to make a move in or you lose one of your byo-yomi periods. So it encourages a different type of play.

As byo-yomi is more common, and is used in tournaments, I wouldn't get used to playing Fischer time.
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Phelan
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I think most digital chess clocks can do byo-yomi, even if they might call it something different. We use some chess clocks for our Go tournaments when we have more players and the ing clocks aren't enough.
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