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Subject: Visualizing Appeal during Production rss

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calvin chow
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I've taken to using the Administration Track when assigning appeal during Production. I found it helps keep all the players on the same page and lets them check their math...

To demonstrate, let's run production for bread. In the photo below, there is 14 demand for bread, and let's assume the yellow, red, and green players have 6 production each...

Step 1: ask players to check their production (to stop assigning demand when production is exhausted)...

Step 2: take # of cubes equal to demand...

Step 3: start assigning cubes according to Appeal Track, using each £ level in the Admin Table as a "tier" to differentiate when players share demand...


In this example for bread production...
- In the £2 tier, yellow gets two cubes. This is because yellow leads with appeal 6 and has no competition for appeal 5.
- In the £4 tier; yellow, red, and the Importer each get two cubes. The Importer's cubes are placed to the right of green's track. This accounts for appeal 4 and appeal 3.
- In the £6 tier; yellow and red get two cubes, while green and the importer get one cube each. This is all of the demand for bread.

When assigning cubes, just skip over players when they meet their maximum production (unless they have warehouse goods to use)... So, if there was 4 more demand in this example (i.e., 18 demand for bread), green and the importer would get one more cube each in the £6 tier; then red and green would get one cube each in the £8 tier (since yellow has reached full production of 6 goods and is not allocated further demand).

Hope others find this useful!
 
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Joe Brown
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This is confusing. Just place your produced goods, one each for level of appeal you are ahead. Maybe it's confusing me but I don't follow the example from the OP
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Armand
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Where are the action tiles? If you're in the production phase there should be tiles in the admin track.

Also, I have to agree, this doesn't seem to clarify it for me. But if it works for you and your group that's great.
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calvin chow
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I just set it up to take the photo...

Sorry it wasn't helpful to you.
 
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James Klemm
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Seems like a good idea. I thought of a similar idea for Automobile.
 
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Jonathan Maisonneuve
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Fizbin44 wrote:
This is confusing. Just place your produced goods, one each for level of appeal you are ahead. Maybe it's confusing me but I don't follow the example from the OP


I don't get it either.
 
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Bob Boberson
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To me the way that the rulebook advises satisfying demand based on appeal is kind of backwards and unintuitive. So after a bit of thought I decided to re-jig how it operates.

First thing I did was to use the 8 cubes each player has in their own colour as the production cubes, rather than using the brown ones for everything. The brown cubes are instead the colour of the importer's goods.

Seeing as each player has their own player board there is no real need for the price markers there to be the player's own colour, so I replaced them all with a neutral (white) colour. Also I replaced the other 4 cubes on the appeal track with counters so that they're easier to stack.

The player cubes now can be used to track production and sales. First thing at the end of a cycle is for everyone to produce their goods. Each player puts their own coloured cubes on their factory to indicate that factory has produced that many goods, as below (I've removed all other factories and am only showing 2 players to avoid confusion):



Next, one player calls out from the appeal track just as in the rulebook, except instead of filling the demand track beforehand with goods cubes (which haven't been produced yet, and makes it look like all the demand has already been satisfied) then taking them back off again, the demand tracks remain empty (representing the lack of goods in England - which the players are about to supply).

Each player removes one of their coloured cubes from their factory when called - in this case the bread that they've just produced - and places it on to the lowest space of the demand track (thus filling the demand for that good). They do so from the bottom to the top of the track, so that when the demand has been fully satisfied there's no more space for goods, signifying that there's no more demand in England for that good.

Once this is done everyone will be able to see at a glance how many goods each player produced that England will buy. The number of cubes left in each player's factory on their personal board can also be seen by everyone at a glance, and these can either be stored, shipped or disposed of:



I find this much easier to visualise and manage than the recommended way. It's more thematic aswell. The people in England want clothes and such, but they don't want all the same clothes. Some want red clothes, some want yellow. Or they like a particular brand of clothes, bread etc.

The only problem I can see with using this system is that you will likely need to scrounge up some extra wooden cubes and/or counters from somewhere, because the 8 coloured cubes supplied with the game will not be enough. However I have more cubes, so it works just fine for me, and I got the extra counters from my 2 copies of Brass. One set from my old copy when I upgraded to the deluxe edition, and the other set came from the deluxe edition when I upgraded the counters to top hats that I took from my copy of Last Will.

Sometimes I think I enjoy customising board games more than playing them!
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