$35.00
Gary Dahl
United States
Wisconsin
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Hey Folks, I'm working on a mathematical puzzler of a game (similar in feel to systems like math dice, but with more game) and with a mathematical theme: Fields Medal Solitaire! I've been getting quite a bit of enjoyment out of this little game so far, and am very interested in collecting more feedback.

Here's a teaser to give you a sense of what the gameplay feels like: Use any combination of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and concatenation (for example concatenate 8 and 7 to make 87), to combine any subset of the numbers 9, 5, 2, and 3 to make each of the following results: 78, 32, 31, and 55.

If you enjoy this kind of challenge, please let me know what you think about this WIP game: Fields Medal Solitaire. You can play with any standard deck of cards. Thanks!
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Garry Hoddinott
Australia
Brisbane
Queensland
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Gary, I'm an old chalkie. The very expression dates me! Anyway, I used to break out the packs of cards with my kids regularly. I had made up a bunch of games using just cards and one of them was exactly that - I'd write a number on the board and the first pair of kids to form a "number sentence" won the round. Winners wrote it on the board, the class checked it, they won an early mark - what we called getting out of school early. What a joke, these days it would be seen as endangering the welfare of a kid to let them out of the school before bell time. Concatenation??? huh? I was only a primary teacher!!!
 
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Jake Staines
United Kingdom
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I hate to break it to you, but academics within the field of Mathematics have been playing a game they call "Fields Medal Solitaire" for decades. It's quite an interesting one which has something in common with games like Nomic or Risk Legacy, in that you don't know all of the rules of the game when you start and as the game progresses, you make some up yourself and learn some from other players, and the state of the game changes for everyone - even if they start playing after you finish your game.

The player starts with a ream of paper and a pack of pencils, and they win if they can reach any of a variety of different victory conditions using any valid mechanism they choose. The most common victory conditions people aim for are things like proving P = NP or the Riemann Hypothesis, but there's loads of them, and they get added and removed all the time. For example, about ten years ago some Russian chap won the game after proving the Poincaré conjecture, and that got removed from the victory conditions list. Then he refused to accept he'd won anyway, but still nobody else can take that victory route.

The most unique part from a game-design perspective is the loss condition - you lose if you're still playing the game on your 40th birthday!

 
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Gary Dahl
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@Garry - the concatenation operator is probably a result of my being a computer programmer. Although it does add a nice lateral thinking element to the puzzles. For me this concatenation operation really helps keep the puzzles fresh with surprising solutions.

@Jake - Is there any documentation for this game anywhere? I'm much more excited to learn more about this game than I am to lose the name.. which is absolutely a WIP. I suspect this is being posted ironically(?), but if not please let me know where I can learn more. And if it is, please feel free to flesh out these rules and link me to those laugh
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Jake Staines
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SugarPillStudios wrote:

@Jake - Is there any documentation for this game anywhere? ... I suspect this is being posted ironically(?)


Only a little bit tongue-in-cheek! But yes, I'm referring to the original Fields Medal - while it's not strictly speaking unconditional, I'm pretty sure they'd award it to you if you could prove that P=NP before your 40th birthday! ;-)
 
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