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Subject: That question again: Which game should we buy next? rss

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Harshad D
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Hi everyone
I would like to outright apologise to all those who saw the thread title and felt a pang of annoyance -- "The same damn question AGAIN!". I will try to explain why asking this question is important to me (in no particular order):

1. I live in India, and getting my hands on good board games here is difficult.
2. I and wife are the ones who play the game. Both of us are quite new to boardgaming, and because of point 1, we have not been exposed to a lot of board games.
3. We are not exposed to many gameplay mechanisms -- so if someone asks us 'Do you like card drafting?' we would be like 'Um, we sort of know what it means but we are not sure how it actually works'.
4. There are SO MANY good games out there. I feel overwhelmed.
5. We have set ourselves a limit of buying 2-3 games each year. I have already got Twilight Struggle and haven't come around to play it.
6. (Major reason) My wife will be in London 6 weeks early next year, and she will be bringing back a board game to add to our collection.

I have been thinking over and over, and from what I like about Agricola, I know we like the worker placement and resource management mechanism. So, just to start off, I am interested in (but not sure because):

1. Fields of Arle (too much like Agricola, theme wise?)
2. A Feast for Odin (too big for us mere n00bs)
3. Caverna (again, too much like Agricola)
4. Alchemists (I like the deduction theme, but will replay value wear out quickly?)
5. Scythe (I think I want this, but should I jump at it)

As you can see, I have shortlisted most of these games based on Agricola. But we want to explore more 'types' of games.
Our first 'true' (as in not risk or monopoly) board game was Carcassonne. We have a couple of expansions for the same. Then I asked around and we got Agricola because it was recommended by many people. We LOVE it. We also have Patchwork. And Twilight Struggle (my wife isn't into the theme much, so I haven't got a chance to play it).

TL;DR:

We rarely get a chance to buy a board game, and since we have one now we want to make it count. We love Agricola, but we want to try other mechanisms. But we haven't played many games to know if we like or dislike any mechanism.

Any opinions on what our next game could be?
Thanks!
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uberjoker wrote:
3. We are not exposed to many gameplay mechanisms -- so if someone asks us 'Do you like card drafting?' we would be like 'Um, we sort of know what it means but we are not sure how it actually works'.
4. There are SO MANY good games out there. I feel overwhelmed.

Welcome to the hobby. Your reaction is very normal (see my description of the usual board gamer's lifecicle ►here).

uberjoker wrote:
5. We have set ourselves a limit of buying 2-3 games each year.

Well, I will just say this: good luck with that...
What I mean is: most people really struggle to resist the urge to test and buy more games. "The Cult of the New" is a term which describes this type of hobbyists and it can indeed be challenging to not go crazy, because on top of all the existing games we are constantly getting new ones.

uberjoker wrote:
As you can see, I have shortlisted most of these games based on Agricola. But we want to explore more 'types' of games. Our first 'true' (as in not risk or monopoly) board game was Carcassonne.

Have you considered exploring Ameritrash or abstract games, maybe leaving your comfort zone for a bit ? I'm not sure if this is the right moment already and maybe you want to stick to Eurogames that you seem to like, but still, I wanted to pitch the idea of branching out into something completely different. Twilight Struggle will definitely lead you in a very different direction, but be "warned": it's certainly not a game for everyone (theme, very confrontational, learning curve,...), although it's great.

uberjoker wrote:
Any opinions on what our next game could be?

As you already know and said yourself: the options are really overwhelming and you can go in very different directions in terms of genres - and even inside these genres, there are genre mixes or games with a very certain focus, making it stand out and unique.

Mind if I ask you a few questions ?

1 What do you and your wife like about your favourite games ? Anything is acceptable as an answer: components, a certain mechanism, atmosphere, having many interesting options on each turn, level of competition, different ways to play/win, storytelling, accessibility,......

The great thing about our hobby is that everyone has a different definition why games are "fun".

2 What are aspects you and your wife really dislike in games ? Like: why do you really dislike game X ? Or even though you love game Y, which detail annoys you or could be improving in your opinion ?

Talking about Agricola for example, the fact that the family needs to be fed puts on many players too much pressure, so they dislike the whole game. What made me dislike the game personally is that it always feels like it ends too soon and that you have not accomplished enough (which is of course an integral part of the game's design). From what I've heard, Caverna ""fixed"" both aspects for people who don't want this pressure but still enjoy the other aspects of Agricola.

3 Any certain themes you both like ?

4 What playtime length do you aim for ? Everyone has a different time frame which feels a) comfortable and b) realistic to actually find the time to play a game.

5 What are your opinions on the element of luck ?

6 What are your opinions on cooperative games ?


I don't want to leave you empty-handed though.

Here's an introduction to the hobby in general (not necessary in your case) and a fast-forward through very different genres of games (although of course by far not covering every single one there is):




One last thing: as you might have noticed, I have asked these questions both of you, since it's important that both of you will like the same game - otherwise it will just sit on your shelf and one of you will get frustrated seeing it collecting dust. Or one person is not really enjoying it. Explore the hobby together, it's more fun this way, saves you money, time and from frustration.

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Harshad D
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Thank you for the awesome reply!

Kyur wrote:
Welcome to the hobby. Your reaction is very normal (see my description of the usual board gamer's lifecicle ►here).


I can connect with this! We must be somewhere between Seriously, wow and Light games(though considering Agricola and TS, I might have jumped the gun too soon!)

Kyur wrote:
Well, I will just say this: good luck with that...
What I mean is: most people really struggle to resist the urge to test and buy more games. "The Cult of the New" is a term which describes this type of hobbyists and it can indeed be challenging to not go crazy, because on top of all the existing games we are constantly getting new ones.


Kyur wrote:
Have you considered exploring Ameritrash or abstract games, maybe leaving your comfort zone for a bit ? I'm not sure if this is the right moment already and maybe you want to stick to Eurogames that you seem to like, but still, I wanted to pitch the idea of branching out into something completely different. Twilight Struggle will definitely lead you in a very different direction, but be "warned": it's certainly not a game for everyone (theme, very confrontational, learning curve,...), although it's great.


We are totally open to try anything new. I think it was more of a coincidence than a conscious choice that we chose Carcassonne or Agricola!


Kyur wrote:
Mind if I ask you a few questions ?


I am thankful you are!

Quote:
What do you and your wife like about your favourite games ? Anything is acceptable as an answer: components, a certain mechanism, atmosphere, having many interesting options on each turn, level of competition, different ways to play/win, storytelling, accessibility,......


We discussed this, and I'm happy now that we did! We really like the art, the components, the theme in the euros we have played so far. The way the components build up and the farm develops in Agricola, or the beautiful cities and landscapes that come out in Carcassonne...we love that stuff. We also like the light conflict in both games, though as you rightly point out, it does get a bit tense in Agricola. But giving this more thought, I guess we like the light-hearted fun and creativity required by games like Balderdash and Dixit...we really enjoy those games, but they don't work with 2 people, alas.

Quote:
What are aspects you and your wife really dislike in games ? Like: why do you really dislike game X ? Or even though you love game Y, which detail annoys you or could be improving in your opinion ?


I also found out talking to my wife after reading this question that she doesn't like Agricola as much as I do, because it's too long! Oh well.
For me, Carcassonne is sometimes too light. In Agricola, it's just a mad dash to do everything so as not to lose points. So it seems a bit silly when I just make sure I have ONE vegetable or ONE pig on my farm. And it tends to get tense, for me anyway. Wife is too busy most of the time kicking up a farm better than mine

Quote:
Any certain themes you both like ?

Um, not specifically. But I think we both enjoy games where the theme and the mechanics and gameplay lend itself to each other. This just makes the game more fun for us. So I think we won't enjoy abstract games much.

Quote:

What playtime length do you aim for ?


I think we will get more gaming done if the game was about an hour, tops. That's the sole reason Carcassonne comes out much more than Agricola, and TS hasn't come out yet. Sigh.

Quote:
What are your opinions on the element of luck ?

Both if us aren't really fans of luck, as a primary mechanic. If it thematically makes sense, that's cool.

Quote:
What are your opinions on cooperative games ?

We had almost gone for Forbidden Island once in the past, though I dont remember why we didn't. We are totally up for cooperative games!


Quote:
I don't want to leave you empty-handed though

You definitely didn't. Talking about this has only given us much better insight! Thank you!


Quote:
One last thing: as you might have noticed, I have asked these questions both of you, since it's important that both of you will like the same game - otherwise it will just sit on your shelf and one of you will get frustrated seeing it collecting dust. Or one person is not really enjoying it. Explore the hobby together, it's more fun this way, saves you money, time and from frustration.


I see your point completely. I am still looking for someone to play TS with! So that's one (expensive) mistake I dont want to repeat again!
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uberjoker wrote:
Thank you for the awesome reply!

You're welcome. You answers are definitely helpful for getting a better idea what recommendations might work out for you and your wife. I will post my recommendations later (really tired at the moment), but maybe others can based on your answers already provide some ideas (although I'm afraid most people won't read through the wall of text we created).

uberjoker wrote:
Kyur wrote:
Welcome to the hobby. Your reaction is very normal (see my description of the usual board gamer's lifecicle ►here).


I can connect with this! We must be somewhere between Seriously, wow and Light games(though considering Agricola and TS, I might have jumped the gun too soon!)

About "jumping the gun": maybe, maybe not - it really depends on the individual player. You both like Agricola, that's the important thing.

uberjoker wrote:
Quote:
I don't want to leave you empty-handed though

You definitely didn't. Talking about this has only given us much better insight! Thank you!

It can indeed be quite time-consuming to define your own taste, but it's not a race, so: take your time ! If you are careful with your purchases (thumbsup), you will definitely spend quite some time on research: watching/reading reviews and playthroughs, downloading and reading rules, using forums - and if you are lucky, you might even have a chance to try before you buy.

One thing which might also provide you with some inspiration and can also be entertaining to watch for both of you is the web show TableTop. It's easy to find on YouTube and they recently started season 4.

uberjoker wrote:
Quote:
One last thing: as you might have noticed, I have asked these questions both of you, since it's important that both of you will like the same game - otherwise it will just sit on your shelf and one of you will get frustrated seeing it collecting dust. Or one person is not really enjoying it. Explore the hobby together, it's more fun this way, saves you money, time and from frustration.


I see your point completely. I am still looking for someone to play TS with! So that's one (expensive) mistake I dont want to repeat again!

There's a really good official digital version for Twilight Struggle that you can play online against others or a solid AI.
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Harshad D
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Quote:
I will post my recommendations later (really tired at the moment)


No worries. You are already investing a lot of time in this


Quote:
It can indeed be quite time-consuming to define your own taste, but it's not a race, so: take your time ! If you are careful with your purchases (thumbsup), you will definitely spend quite some time on research: watching/reading reviews and playthroughs, downloading and reading rules, using forums - and if you are lucky, you might even have a chance to try before you buy.


This is what is exciting. Watching run through videos and being able to follow the action and understanding what's happening - this has happened to me only after I played a few games and understood how it works. As a first timer, I remember I had problems just following and 'imagining' or 'understanding' the moves and mechanics. Thankfully I'm beyond that phase now!

I have indeed seen Tabletop, though I enjoy the rahdo runs through videos more. There's something about seeing the board from a first person POV I guess!

Quote:
There's a really good official digital version for Twilight Struggle that you can play online against others or a solid AI.


Thanks for pointing this out! I just downloaded the digital version of TS on Steam and looking forward to have a go solo after work today!
 
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A Feast for Odin is quite different from Agricola. Uwe Rosenberg has creacted sort of an amalgam of most of his earlier games. I recommend to watch a playthrough video (there are some in the review section).

Another suggestion: Istanbul. It is a lighter Euro, but has a nice theme and beautiful components plus a variable board for diverse gameplay. (There are also two expansions.)
 
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chris thatcher
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Standard suggestion but check out The Castles of Burgundy. Very popular couples game that can play up to 4
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Quick summary (correct me if I got anything wrong):

Likes:
♦ Eurogames (Agricola, Carcassonne)
♦ Art, components, theme
♦ Building/developing
♦ Light conflict between players
♦ Light-hearted fun
♦ Creativity
♦ Not too light (E Carcassonne)
♦ Good integration of theme (reflected by rules and mechanisms)

Dislikes:
♦ Abstracts
♦ Too much luck

Curious about:
♦ Cooperative games
♦ Ameritrash games
♦ New mechanisms (played Carcassonne and Agricola before)

Requirements:
♦ Good with 2 players
♦ ~1 hour playtime



Let's see...

Dominion (Second Edition)

2-4 players (competitive)
Easy rules
~30 minutes playtime
Very high replay value
Many expansions available
Often criticised for having no real theme
Lot of shuffling while playing

E Deck-building, hand management


(Picture showing 1st edition)

Dominion is a landmark in the board game hobby which cannot be overlooked, as it is the game that started a whole deckbuilding craze a few years ago and its influence can still be felt to this day. After its release, designers immediately came up with their own games based on the same idea or they integrated the concept in/around their designs.

Without getting into too much details of explaining the rules: the charm of Dominion is that each player adds new cards to their own decks over the course of game and that you keep playing with them for the rest of the game.
While you are not building a city or landscape like in other games, you are shaping and fine-tuning your very own deck of cards, following a certain strategy in your mind.

The replay value is very high, as the game comes with a lot of different stacks of cards but you only ever bring 10 of them to the table during setup, which has a huge impact in which direction the game can go (conflict, fast growth, combos, ...).

The only downside: if you don't like shuffling cards, this game can get annoying, as it plays very fast and you try to keep your deck as effective and slim as possible. As stated above, the game is also often criticised for having no real theme (or a thin one), and as a fan of thematic games myself I can honestly say that it doesn't bother me at all. The way the cards work do provide enough theme for me in regard of their names and artworks.

Dominion won the Spiel des Jahres award in 2009. The 2nd edition was just released.


Jaipur

2 players (competitive)
Very easy rules
15-30 minutes playtime
Great (colourful) components
Small box
Small price
Language-independent
Relatively time-consuming setup

E Set collecting, hand management, trading



Jaipur is one of the most recommended games on BGG - and for many good reasons. If you want to test the waters of set collecting games, this is your game. The rules are very simple, the playtime is very short and while it may appear very light in the beginning, players usually discover the game's depth after having played their first few games. The only other downside in your case: it is indeed still a very light game and no step up in complexity.


San Juan (second edition)

2-4 players (competitive)
Easy rules
~45-60 minutes playtime
Great replay value

E Hand management, engine-building, economy


San Juan is a clever compact card game, using its cards in 3 different ways: buildings, currency and goods. Over the course of the game, players build their own town of buildings providing certain bonuses. San Juan offers a lot of strategic depth, especially for such a "small" game, as there are many different buildings and various paths to win the game.

While there is no direct conflict, conflict is still definitely present in a passive way, because what you do on your turn will also always influence what is happening to the other player(s): you select a role and everybody at the table also gets to take the same action, if they want to. If you like having a streamlined economy aspect in your game and seeing your own creation grow over the course of the game, definitely take a closer look at this one.


Seasons

2-4 players (competitive)
Medium complexity
~60 minutes playtime
One of the best rulebooks
Excellent (colourful) components (beautiful artworks)
Great replay value
Can be played in 3 different complexity levels
Some cards can be really "mean" to other players - but those can be sorted out during setup

E Card drafting, engine-building, dice rolling


Seasons is interesting for different reasons, as it strikes an excellent balance between cardplay and dice, strategy and luck, appearing like a harmless game yet having great depth and potential for conflict.

It's very colourful and just pleasant to look at, the artworks are fantastic. Because the game can be played in 3 different complexity levels, the game also ensures that it can appeal to more people: while the lowest complexity level uses pre-constructed decks and excludes the more complex and high-conflict cards, the highest complexity level adds a highly strategic and short card drafting phase before the "actual" game begins.

The rulebooks deserves to be mentioned, as it is very clear and it lists every single card with potential interactions with other cards, answering any potential question.


Suburbia

1-4 players (competitive)
Medium complexity
~60-90 minutes
Minimalistic look
Great replay value (open/secret goals, randomly pool of available tiles)

E Tile placement, engine-building, economy


Wait, don't run away. I know Suburbia is not the prettiest looking game, but it's a really good one and once you played it, you will actually appreciate the simplistic look, as it provides a good overview that players need. If you ever played any game of the Sim City video game series: this is pretty much exactly the board game version. Each player builds his/her own cosy little suburb, but because you are part of the same city, each player can indirectly influence the concrete landscape of the other players.

The game finds a really nice balance between easy-going gameplay and serious strategic pressure, because the growth of a player's suburb not only brings benefits, but also problems, and each player tries to fulfil certain goals by the end of the game. The replay value is really good, because there are always more tiles in the box that you need in the actual game, the open goals for bonus points are randomly generated plus each player has his/her own secret goal for scoring bonus points, meaning that your suburb can look like an industrial landscape, a commercial paradise or just like a friendly neighbourhood -- or a balanced mix.

Since you like building and creating stuff on your table, I definitely recommend taking a closer look on this game. People also often mention Castles of Mad King Ludwig in the same sentence as Suburbia, so I would also recommend doing some research on this one.


Takenoko

2-4 players (competitive)
Easy rules
~45 minutes
Gorgeous (colourful) components
Language-independent
Easy-going atmopshere (no direct conflict)
Element of luck
Panda !

E Tile placement, set collecting, pattern building


Another game that is very often recommended in BGG and it's probably one of the best family games currently available. Takenoko pretty much delivers exactly what it looks like: fun in a relaxed table atmosphere.

The game is pleasant to look at, the components are great and there is no direct open conflict, since the goal cards of each player are hidden, meaning that blocking is not possible in this game. Some people like this aspect, others don't - to me, Takenoko is one of the games I like to play when I just want to have some lighter board game fun without needing to worry too much about strategy or conflict, since the focus of this game is not strategy, but on-turn-based fast tactical decisions. If you are looking for a more relaxed game experience once in a while, Takenoko might be your game - but it's definitely not a step up in complexity.


Targi

2 players (competitive)
Medium complexity
~45-60 minutes
Good replay value
Small box
Small price

E Set collecting, worker placement


Targi is a sleeper hit in my opinion and I also underestimated it at first. It looks like a relatively harmless game, but it has great strategic depth. To be honest, it may even look pretty generic or even boring, which is why every single time I play it reminds me how good it really is. Don't make the same mistake and judge the game by it's not-so-impressive appearance, it's really good and since it's specifically designed for 2 players, the game feels and plays very focussed.

Targi was nominated for the Kennerspiel des Jares award 2012.


Legacy: The Testament of Duke de Crecy

1-4 players (competitive)
Medium complexity
~60 minutes
Great components
Great replay value
Humour
Requires a big table, even with just 2 players

E Engine-building, hand management, worker placement



Legacy: TToDdC is quite different, but in a good way. It's a worker placement game, but manages to implement theme and humour in a very nice way. The theme is fresh and different (building an aristocratic family tree), players have different interesting options on each turn and the replay value is great because of all the different characters and hidden goal each player has.

If you ever wanted to feel like an overly determined aristocrat carefully planning your family's legacy by arraging marriages just because it benefits your family tree, there you go. Because the different characters in this game are drawn in a comical way and their special powers/benefits to your family make thematic sense, your family tree will tell a story by the end of the game.


The Lord of the Rings: The Card Game

1-2 players (cooperative)
Mid-heavy complexity
~45-60 minutes
Fantastic components (excellent artworks)
Tough challenge, so winning will feel really good
LCG format (not for everyone)
Pre-game deck construction (not for everyone)

E Variable player powers, hand management, pre-game deck construction





This is probably the heaviest game on this list and it's probably also the one that is most different in a lot of ways, but I see this as something positive, since you are curious about other types of games. Anyway, LotR LCG is a cooperative 2-player card game based on Tolkien's books, but you don't have to be a fan of them to actually enjoy this game (I know, because this applies to me). Having said that, if you are a fan, you will enjoy the small details of this game, like direct quotes from the books on many cards.

It's a card-based scenario-driven cooperative game in which players construct their decks of cards before the game actually starts - some players like this strategic element outside of the game, others don't. The game is also a "Living Card Game", meaning that you can buy small adventure packs over time which add new adventures and cards to your available card pool, so be warned: if you fall in love with this game, you might spend a bit of money on it. That being said, the base game will suffice to give you a solid impression and in my opinion, the replay value is already satisfying with just a bunch of adventure packs.

As I said earlier: the game is the heaviest on this list, not because the rules are that complicated or complex (although there definitely is a steep learning curve at the beginning), but because the game requires close attention from the players because eventually there will be a lot of cards laying out on the table and you have to maintain an overview in case that certain events may trigger.

All that being said, because it's designed for specifially 2 players, this game offers a tough challenge and tense table experience on which you will high five each other when you manage to win.


Good luck and have fun !
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Harshad D
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Thank you!

Mondkalb123 wrote:
A Feast for Odin is quite different from Agricola. Uwe Rosenberg has creacted sort of an amalgam of most of his earlier games. I recommend to watch a playthrough video (there are some in the review section).


I agree it's different, and I will definitely get at it...but I'm pretty sure it won't fit in ~1 hour, so am keeping it on my wishlist for now.

Mondkalb123 wrote:
Another suggestion: Istanbul. It is a lighter Euro, but has a nice theme and beautiful components plus a variable board for diverse gameplay. (There are also two expansions.)


Yup I had almost bought this one when I saw it in a game store...I just fell in love with the cover design. This too is a wishlist game!

 
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Harshad D
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Tariff wrote:
Standard suggestion but check out The Castles of Burgundy. Very popular couples game that can play up to 4


this does look interesting. Will catch up a few gameplay vids with wife and see how she likes it
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Harshad D
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Whoa! I don't know how to thank you enough Kyur! This is so helpful, and it just makes my job so much easier now that I have a short list to go through! Thank you for the personalized descriptions, and the summary of each game. I know how I am going to do now -- watch gameplay vids for each of the games you have listed,and decide on one. have gone through each, and I definitely find each one interesting and a departure from what I have played so far. That's a wonderful plus to have.

Right at the moment, I have a bent towards jaipur and LOTR:LCG --- the former because it looks fun, and specially this line:

Quote:
If you want to test the waters of set collecting games, this is your game


The latter because I'm a big Tolkien fan. I'm gonna dig the theme no end.
But then again there's San Juan in there....which looks very promising too...especially the engine building. And seasons looks great too...and so does Targi. Whew. Lot's of videos to watch!

But I know what to do next, and thank you for that!
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Nicole M
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Hello,

here are the games my husband and i like to play together:
- Alchemists
- Castles of mad king ludwig
- keyflower
- last will
- Puerto Rico (2p variant is great)
- rococo
- splendor
- takenoko


maybe you'll also like Dungeon Petz, La granja, istanbul - which we are about to try
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Elena Litovka
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Quote:
Quick summary (correct me if I got anything wrong):

Likes:
♦ Eurogames (Agricola, Carcassonne)
♦ Art, components, theme
♦ Building/developing
♦ Light conflict between players
♦ Light-hearted fun
♦ Creativity
♦ Not too light (E Carcassonne)
♦ Good integration of theme (reflected by rules and mechanisms)

Dislikes:
♦ Abstracts
♦ Too much luck

Curious about:
♦ Cooperative games
♦ Ameritrash games
♦ New mechanisms (played Carcassonne and Agricola before)

Requirements:
♦ Good with 2 players
♦ ~1 hour playtime


Based on that, I would suggest 7 Wonders Duel, as it is a great 2-player game that fits your likes and requirements.
Also one of our favourites (I play with my husband) is Grand Austria Hotel. This can last longer than an hour, but it is wonderful euro with theme beautifully blended with mechanics. I believe, the artist is the same as in Agricola.
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Goeshi
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Also check out Istanbul. It won the Spiel des Jahres a couple of years ago and it pretty much fits all the criteria you're after. I love it.
 
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David B
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KYUR's recommendation of San Juan second edition is a very good one.
 
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Milki Kaplanski
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Kyur wrote:

Legacy: The Testament of Duke de Crecy

:star: 1-4 players (competitive)
:star: Medium complexity
:star: ~60 minutes
:star: Great components
:star: Great replay value
:star: Humour
:nostar: Requires a big table, even with just 2 players

:arrowE: Engine-building, hand management, worker placement


+1 for Legacy

It's a really good 2 player game, the only issue with it I have is table space, as mentioned: You need lots of it.

The solo mode is also great and can be easily done as a co-op. Really love the game!!


Another thing I'd suggest, that can be played in an hour (with two), is Imperial Settlers - very fun, competitive civilisation building that's easy to learn but takes a while to master. :)

As a good, simple card drafting game with super pretty components I'd recommend Oceanos - plays great with two but is also great with more people! Not high on conflict, but we found it super fun and can be played in less than 45 minutes with 2 or 3 people. :)
 
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uberjoker wrote:
Whoa! I don't know how to thank you enough Kyur!

Reporting back with what game(s) you eventually got and what your and your wife's opinions are on the new game(s) would be great.

uberjoker wrote:
Right at the moment, I have a bent towards jaipur and LOTR:LCG --- the former because it looks fun, and specially this line:

Quote:
If you want to test the waters of set collecting games, this is your game


The latter because I'm a big Tolkien fan. I'm gonna dig the theme no end.
But then again there's San Juan in there....which looks very promising too...especially the engine building. And seasons looks great too...and so does Targi. Whew. Lot's of videos to watch!

But I know what to do next, and thank you for that!

You really can't go wrong with Jaipur in my opinion. You can learn and play the game in ~30 minutes.




The Lord of the Rings: The Card Game will require a bit more time for doing your homework before you can bring it to the table, but it's worth the time investment in my opinion. If you like The Lord of the Rings and are interested in a cooperative game with more complexity, this might really be your game and it can keep you busy for a long time (if you invest more money later on in a few adventure packs).

 
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Squishi wrote:
Hello,

here are the games my husband and i like to play together:
- Alchemists
- Castles of mad king ludwig
- keyflower
- last will
- Puerto Rico (2p variant is great)
- rococo
- splendor
- takenoko


maybe you'll also like Dungeon Petz, La granja, istanbul - which we are about to try


thank you! I have seen runthroughs for alchemists, keyflower and rococo..and I do like them! Its so hard to pick just one game!
 
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Alienka wrote:
Quote:
Quick summary (correct me if I got anything wrong):

Likes:
♦ Eurogames (Agricola, Carcassonne)
♦ Art, components, theme
♦ Building/developing
♦ Light conflict between players
♦ Light-hearted fun
♦ Creativity
♦ Not too light (E Carcassonne)
♦ Good integration of theme (reflected by rules and mechanisms)

Dislikes:
♦ Abstracts
♦ Too much luck

Curious about:
♦ Cooperative games
♦ Ameritrash games
♦ New mechanisms (played Carcassonne and Agricola before)

Requirements:
♦ Good with 2 players
♦ ~1 hour playtime


Based on that, I would suggest 7 Wonders Duel, as it is a great 2-player game that fits your likes and requirements.
Also one of our favourites (I play with my husband) is Grand Austria Hotel. This can last longer than an hour, but it is wonderful euro with theme beautifully blended with mechanics. I believe, the artist is the same as in Agricola.


I'll definitely check out both these games! Thank you
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Goeshi wrote:
Also check out Istanbul. It won the Spiel des Jahres a couple of years ago and it pretty much fits all the criteria you're after. I love it.


Oh yeah I have my sights on Istanbul for a long time now...love the theme of the game and how the mechanics go so well with the theme. Definitely a game I'm going to buy, if not immediately!
 
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miruki wrote:
Kyur wrote:

Legacy: The Testament of Duke de Crecy

1-4 players (competitive)
Medium complexity
~60 minutes
Great components
Great replay value
Humour
Requires a big table, even with just 2 players

E Engine-building, hand management, worker placement


+1 for Legacy

It's a really good 2 player game, the only issue with it I have is table space, as mentioned: You need lots of it.

The solo mode is also great and can be easily done as a co-op. Really love the game!!


Another thing I'd suggest, that can be played in an hour (with two), is Imperial Settlers - very fun, competitive civilisation building that's easy to learn but takes a while to master.

As a good, simple card drafting game with super pretty components I'd recommend Oceanos - plays great with two but is also great with more people! Not high on conflict, but we found it super fun and can be played in less than 45 minutes with 2 or 3 people.


the table size requirement for Legacy is a concern tbh, so I might have to put it lower down the list. Will definitely check out the others.Thanks!
 
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Kyur wrote:
Reporting back with what game(s) you eventually got and what your and your wife's opinions are on the new game(s) would be great.


Most certainly!


Kyur wrote:
You really can't go wrong with Jaipur in my opinion. You can learn and play the game in ~30 minutes.


I checked out quite a few run through vids for this...It is indeed a very beautiful looking and easy to understand game. I'm just a bit concerned that it's mechanics are quite light? We play this card game called rummy...and from what I understood about jaipur its quite similar...the aim is to collect as many cards of the same type to make bigger sets to score larger points, while trying to guess what your opponent might be up to and trying to stop her. I get a feeling I have played card games with similar mechanics before. One that I currently do have in my collection is Guillotine...we both liked it initially but quickly got over it because we weren't doing anything much different game to game. I'm worried the same might happen with Jaipur? Though I could be missing something..

Kyur wrote:
The Lord of the Rings: The Card Game will require a bit more time for doing your homework before you can bring it to the table, but it's worth the time investment in my opinion. If you like The Lord of the Rings and are interested in a cooperative game with more complexity, this might really be your game and it can keep you busy for a long time (if you invest more money later on in a few adventure packs).


I'm so intrigued by this game, but my wife doesn't seem to be. I told her a bit about it and she immediately said 'Its like Magic isn't it?'. We have a Magic Elspeth and Kiora deck lying around because she doesn't like it much, and I find it a bit heavy too...so I am unable to generate enough interest in her either. So I may have to keep this aside for now :/

Oh well. There are many more in your list to go!
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Ohh, if you enjoy Rummy, did you ever try any of the Mystery Rummy series? It's Rummy with a twist, there's different versions with a mostly tacked on theme, but quite interesting mechanics, absolutely perfect if standard Rummy is starting to get old. My bestie and I LOVE Mystery Rummy: Jack the Ripper as a two player game and Mystery Rummy: Murders in the Rue Morgue is cool if you play with 4 players in two teams. I haven't tried out the other ones yet, but MR:JtR completely replaced standard Rummy for us. :) It's super small too and not expensive (around £10), so maybe the wife can bring back this + a big game from London. ;)
 
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uberjoker wrote:
I checked out quite a few run through vids for this...It is indeed a very beautiful looking and easy to understand game. I'm just a bit concerned that it's mechanics are quite light? We play this card game called rummy...and from what I understood about jaipur its quite similar...the aim is to collect as many cards of the same type to make bigger sets to score larger points, while trying to guess what your opponent might be up to and trying to stop her. I get a feeling I have played card games with similar mechanics before. One that I currently do have in my collection is Guillotine...we both liked it initially but quickly got over it because we weren't doing anything much different game to game. I'm worried the same might happen with Jaipur? Though I could be missing something..

I don't know the card game you mentioned, but you are right: Jaipur is indeed still a light game. As I mentioned before:
Kyur wrote:
The only other downside in your case: it is indeed still a very light game and no step up in complexity.

If you want a card game with more substance which is still easy to learn, check out Dominion or San Juan.
They may not look as fancy as other games, but they are really fun to play.

uberjoker wrote:
I'm so intrigued by this game, but my wife doesn't seem to be. I told her a bit about it and she immediately said 'Its like Magic isn't it?'. We have a Magic Elspeth and Kiora deck lying around because she doesn't like it much, and I find it a bit heavy too...so I am unable to generate enough interest in her either. So I may have to keep this aside for now :/

Oh well. There are many more in your list to go!

The game's combat system and pre-game deck construction reminds me of Magic, but other than that, they are not comparable. Still, I can understand how your wife sees a resemblance here. LotR LCG is indeed a relatively heavy game and definitely the heaviest in my list of recommendations. By the way, it's works great as a solo game, although I would prefer recommending you a game that both you and your wife will enjoy playing together.

Again, good luck ! thumbsup
 
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I second the suggestions for Dominion and San Juan. They're both very accessible, and both very enjoyable. And both play very well with two players.
 
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