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Subject: My English translation of the telegram cards rss

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Tor Gjerde
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The twenty-four telegram cards are numbered, but the numbers have no relevance in the game. I have retained the numbers in this translation mainly so that the comments at the bottom can more easily be tied to specific cards.

1 – Storm from the west in the Atlantic Ocean. Before each movement, all ships in the Atlantic Ocean drift 3 spaces to the east. (See the section on shipwrecks in the rules).

2 – Storm from the southeast in the Indian Ocean. Before each movement, all ships in the Indian Ocean drift 3 spaces to the northwest. (See the section on shipwrecks in the rules).

3 – Storm from the northeast in the Atlantic Ocean. Before each movement, all ships in the Atlantic Ocean drift 3 spaces to the southwest. (See the section on shipwrecks in the rules).

4 – Storm from the southwest in the Indian Ocean. Before each movement, all ships in the Indian Ocean drift 3 spaces to the northeast. (See the section on shipwrecks in the rules).

5 – Fog in the Mediterranean and the Red Sea. In these waters one may only sail at half speed – i.e. players roll only one die.

6 – SOS signals are received from a ship in distress on space number 8 (south of Africa). The first ship to arrive receives 25 000 as salvage award. The rescue must happen before the next telegram, though.

7 – The Suez canal is closed due to political unrest in Egypt.

8 – Political unrest in the Far East. Ships in the ports of Ceylon, Borneo and Siam must stay in port – and these ports may not be entered by other ships until the unrest has ceased.

9 – Political unrest in South America. Ships in the ports of Venezuela, Brazil and Chile must stay in port – and these ports may not be entered by other ships until the unrest has ceased.

10 – Political unrest in Africa. Ships in the ports of Egypt, the Gold Coast and South Africa must stay in port – and these ports may not be entered by other ships until the unrest has ceased.

11 – BANKING CRISIS. The commodities exchange sells its goods for half of its current rate (though as usual only two units to each player when he has rolled a 6). In this period the commodities exchange does not buy any goods from private warehouses, but pays the full rate for goods brought in by ships.

12 – DANGER OF WAR. Every port buys goods from all other ports at a rate of 20. However, a ship may only sell goods of one kind in each port. The commodities exchange pays according to the price chart as usual.

13 – Port strikes in Scandinavia. Ships arriving in Scandinavia with goods must wait to sell these until the strike is over.

14 – Scandinavian protective tariffs. For each good sold to the commodities exchange, a tariff of 5000 must be paid (subtract this from the price paid by the commodities exchange).

15 – All free ships must immediately return to Scandinavia – whether loaded or not – and will receive new assignments there.

16 – All ships without cargo sail to the closest port (not Scandinavia). If there are goods in this port, one unit is loaded – after this, the ship continues to its assignments (if the port in question is among the ships assignments, one may load more than one unit). This telegram does not apply to free ships and foreign goods may not be loaded this way.

17 – Chile buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry salpeter at a rate of 20.

18 – The Gold Coast buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry cocoa at a rate of 20.

19 – Siam buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry rice at a rate of 20.

20 – Brazil buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry coffee at a rate of 20.

21 – South Africa buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry copra at a rate of 20.

22 – Borneo buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry rubber at a rate of 20.

23 – Ceylon buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry tea at a rate of 20.

24 – Australia buys all kinds of goods from ships that do not carry wool at a rate of 20.


My notes

1–4 (all “storm” cards): it is not entirely clear whether a given ship drifts on every player’s turn or only on their own player’s turn. The former reading makes best sence linguistically, and the latter makes it trivial to place onself in such a way as to be almost entirely safe from the effect of any storm. On the other hand, the former reading makes the exact timing unclear when somebody shipwrecks in another player’s turn. I would still suggest going for this interpretation, with the clarification that towing and selling the cargo following a shipwreck happens on the shipwrecked player’s own turn, regardless of on whose turn the shipwreck happened. It also seems logical that telegrams are drawn and resolved immediately after rolling and before the player gets to move, so with an unfortunate placement, one risks being shipwrecked on ones own turn.

7: I would suggest clarifying this to mean that the Suez canal can neither be entered nor exited. If it only prevented the entering, a ship standing on the canal space would be able to exit it in either direction, which is illogical as it would have to pass through the canal in one of the cases. It also makes the situation more similar to the other “political unrest” cards.

7–10 (all “political unrest” cards): Players stuck in a port (or the Suez canal) unable to move should presumably still roll the dice so that they may trigger market trade, new commodity prices and new telegrams. In the latter case they would be able to move out of port using this roll, as the new telegram cancels the unrest immediately.

17–24 and 12 (all “buys at a rate of 20” cards): though not mentioned on the telegram cards themselves, the rules clarify that these cards only apply to ships having fulfilled their assignments, and never to “free ships”. Section j of the rules seems to imply that the entire cargo must be sold, as new assignments are to be rolled after selling in a foreign port, but this can not easily be reconciled with card number 12 which states that only one kind of good may be sold (and even that the same ship may even sell this way in more than one port). So it seems as if one may sell only part of the cargo, and that section j only applies if the entire cargo was sold.

15: My interpretation is that this card immediately makes all assigned ports count as visited, so that all appliccable ships will have to return to Scandinavia by normal movement even if a new telegram is drawn before they reach there. Under this interpretation, non-empty ships may instead sell in a foreign port at rate 20 if the appropriate telegram is drawn while they are on their way back.

16: My interpretation is that the applicable ships must sail to the closest port by normal movement, and must reach it before a new telegram is drawn.
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