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Subject: [WIP] Lines of Battle: Albuera 1811 (2016-17 Wargame P&P Competition) rss

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David Kershaw
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Lines of Battle: Albuera 1811

Brief description: A two player tactical wargame simulating the Napoleonic battle of Albuera. Units represent (approx) 2000 infantry, 1000 cavalry, or 20 cannon. Features lines, columns, squares, different cavalry types and all the other Napoleonic features that make gaming this era such fun.


Historical background: Albuera was a defensive battle by the Allies, under Marshal Beresford, against an attack by French Marshal Soult to relieve the siege of Badajoz in SW Spain. The Allies consisted of British, Portuguese and Spanish arranged in a North-South defensive line. Soult's plan was to conduct a flank march and fall on the Allied Southern flank, held by the Spanish. Soult likely expected these Spanish troops to be easily crushed (as in so many other battles) and the Allied line rolled up. Unfortunately for the French, these were the best Spanish troops in Spain, and they held the French until British reinforcements arrived. Soults army was top-heavy in cavalry, and he launched an attack, spearheaded by the elite Polish lancers that caused havoc. However, the Allies were able to get more reinforcements up and held the field.


Longer description: This game expands and refines the system used in Lines of Battle: Quatre Bras 1815. The aim is to develop a game that takes the nice looks of Napoleon's Triumph and Eagles of the Empire series, but has mechanics adapted from tabletop miniatures wargaming (Black Powder, Fire and Fury).
Units are given a strength rating. 2 or 3 is typical. If this is reduced below zero through hits then the unit is removed.
The game is played in a series of turns, igo-ugo fashion. Each player has a certain number of Command Points which they can use to activate units. The units can move, rally, or (if artillery) fire. Combat is part of movement and is designed to be a highly interactive process:
Defender may retreat before combat (usually suffering losses).
Defensive artillery fires.
Attacker may declare a feint (to draw enemy out of position).
Attacking artillery fires.
Combat proceeds as a straightforward roll: D6 versus D6. The loser takes 1 loss, except where cavalry are involved - in this case the loser suffers the difference in the rolls - which can be catastrophic!
There are further optional retreats, and then there may be more rolls until one side or the other prevails.
Finally, the winner may optionally launch any cavalry from the combat against the opponent.




Design Aims: A 2 player game that:
*Has the Look of a Napoleonic battle.
*Has the 3 key, distinctive elements: Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery.
*Has interactive battles that can lead to sweeping changes.
*C&C gives constraints on what a player can do.
*Under 2 hours play.
*Less than 20 units per side.


Components: Rules, counters, 2 D6.
Playing time: 1-2 hours.
Prize Categories:


Link to the contest thread: 2016-17 Wargame Print and Play Contest - VOTING CLOSED

Game files can be downloaded here:
Rules: www.kerpob.com/games/LOBv1.pdf

Assembly: Counters only. Map may need collated.

Current State: Concept
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David Kershaw
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Here is my "beta" version of the map. I hope that I've got the main terrain clear:

1. The woods
2. The hills
3. The big river and streams
4. Albuera itself
5. Open terrain areas have the "Approaches" between them shown



Each area has a unique number (except Albuera itself). Close terrain is red square and open terrain is green circle.

Still need to add the ford and bridges at Albuera. Toying with the idea of roads.

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David Kershaw
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The order of battle I am very confident about thanks to the excellent “Albuera 1811 - The Bloodiest Battle of the Peninsular War” by G. Dempsey (2008).

The game has 3 units types, each representing (approx) 2000 infantry, 1000 cavalry, 20 cannons (artillery).

Cavalry are further subdivided into 3 types: Heavy, Light and Lancers.

1. Allied Forces (22 units)
Army reserve:
British KGL Brigade (Alten) = Strength 2 Infantry (Albuera)
2nd Portuguese Brigade (Collins) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 4)
5th Army, 1st Spanish Division (de Espana) = Strength 1 Infantry (Area 3)
5th Army, Spanish Cavalry Division (Penne-Villemur) = Strength 1 Light Cavalry (Area 28)
2nd British Division
1st British Brigade (Colborne) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 10)
2nd British Brigade (Abercrombie) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 10)
3rd British Brigade (Houghton) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 10)
British Artillery (Area 10)
4th British Division
2nd British “Fusilier” Brigade (Myers) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 3)
9th Portuguese Brigade (Harvey) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 3)
Portuguese Division
2nd Portuguese Brigade (Fonseca) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 4)
4th Portuguese Brigade (Campbell) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 4)
Portuguese Artillery (Area 4)
British Cavalry Division
British Heavy Brigade (de Grey) = Strength 3 Heavy Cavalry (Area 15)
Portuguese Brigade (Otway) = Strength 2 Light Cavalry (Area 6)
British 13th Light Dragoons (Head) = Strength 1 Light Cavalry (Area 32)
Spanish 4th Expeditionary Army Corps
Vanguard (Lardizabel) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 23)
3rd Division - 1st Spanish Brigade = Strength 1 Infantry (Area 23)
3rd Division - 2nd Spanish Brigade = Strength 1 Infantry (Area 23)
4th Army Spanish Cavalry Division (Loy) = Strength 1 Light Cavalry (Area 28)
4th Spanish Division, 1st Brigade (Murgeon) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 23)
4th Spanish Division, 2nd Brigade (Polo) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 23)

2. French Forces (17 units)
Army reserve

Grenadiers (Vare) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 72)
Artillery (Area 72)
V Corps, 1st Division
1st Brigade (Brayer) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 75)
2nd Brigade (Veilande) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 75)
Artillery (Area 75)
V Corps, 2nd Division
1st Brigade (Pepin) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 75)
2nd Brigade (Maransin) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 75)
Artillery (Area 75)
Independent Force
12th Light (Dulong) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 72)
16th Light (Dellard) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 25)
55th Line (Schwitter - includes 51st) = Strength 3 Infantry (Area 25)
58th Line (Legrand) = Strength 2 Infantry (Area 72)
Cavalry
Light Brigade (Briche) = Strength 3 Light Cavalry (Area 17)
1st Dragoon Brigade (Bron) = Strength 3 Heavy Cavalry (Area 25)
2nd Dragoon Brigade (Eclat) = Strength 3 Heavy Cavalry (Area 25)
Vistula Lancers (Konopka) = Strength 4 Lancer Cavalry (Area 19)
27th Chausseurs (Arenberg) = Strength 2 Light Cavalry (Area 17)

There are optional rules for Leaders.
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jamuki (Jueguetistorias)
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It looks so nice

If you need something from Spanish sources, let me know
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David Kershaw
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Solo run-through of the rules.

This shows the setup (8am). I'm using the counters from Napoleon's Triumph, but the actual counters will be differently sized for Infantry, Cavalry and Artillery. They will also have unit designations and different colours for the different nationalities present. I used red lego bits for hits.


By the end of turn 3 (9.30am), the French had marched to the Allied flank and were threatening it. Their Dragoons had seen off some Allied light cavalry, inflicting the first casualty of the day:


At the end of turn 4 (10am) the French had attempted to further turn the Allied flank, but their lead units were cut off by a counterattack.


End of turn 5 (10.30am). The French have fought their way back. Both armies are starting to get quite battered. Action at Albuera town itself is minimal, so the Allies have started moving reinforcements over.


End of turn 7 (11.30pm). The Vistula Lancers have pounced - overrunning the extended Allies.


End of turn 8 (12pm). A lull, as the French moved their Cavalry from Albuera to reinforce the main action:


End of turn 9 (12.30pm). The French moved all their cavalry over to the main part of the battle and launched an attack with their cavalry that burst the Allied centre. The Allies tried to contain this, but their units were too weak to dislodge the French. However, losses on both sides resulted in morale dropping below zero for both sides - so it ended in a draw.


I hope to get the rules cleaned up soon, and then proper units.
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David Kershaw
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Another play through.

The French started their flank move, but failed to cover it with cavalry, thus the Spanish were able to sacrifice their 2 light cavalry to delay the French.

This shows end of turn 3 - The French are at the flank, but the allies are prepared. That damaged French cavalry was subsequently beaten up by the remaining Allied light:


By turn 6, the French were massing against the Allied line, which was now well prepared. They have sent their elite Vistula lancers to the extreme left (top of the image):


The French went for a desperate gambit and broke a hole in the centre. Unfortunately their lancers were too far off on the flanks to support. Instead the French were surrounded and wiped out, handing a comfortable victory to the Allies. This shows the one remaining French unit about to be exterminated:

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David Kershaw
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The rules have also taken shape.

Broadly it is IGO-UGO.

Each player:

Rolls for command points (D3+1 in most turns of the Albuera game)
Uses command points to either:
Rally a single unit
Activate all units in an Area
Activated units can move (including into combat) or artillery may fire (max range is 2 Areas = 1000m)

That's it.

Movement is Area to Area, with the exception that Infantry can deploy on the Approach, which is the interface between two areas. This gives them a bonus in combat. Alternatively, infantry can form square (good against cavalry, not so good for movement, and a nice target for artillery)

Movement rates are 3 for infantry/artillery and 4 for cavalry. It costs +1 to attempt to move into combat (this reflects that some deployment/preparation is necessary for an attack as opposed to straightforward movement).

The combat process is more involved - I'll cover that later.
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David Kershaw
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Combat system - Dice off
The combat system has at its heart a dice-off: The attacker and the defender each roll a D6 and the highest roller wins. The defender wins in a draw. This means, all else being equal, the defender would win 58% of the time.

But in war, things are not equal. Both sides get to add their unit strength to the roll. This varies between 1 and 4, with 2 and 3 being the most common values. 3 would be veterans, 2 trained but inexperienced. 1 would be hopeless militia, 4 would be guards and other elites. Unit strength is reduced through hits in combat, when it drops below zero the unit is eliminated.

If the attacker is 1 stronger than the defender (3 versus 2) then the defender's chance of winning drops from 58% to 42% - a neat reversal of fortune!

On the other hand, if the defender is 1 stronger than the attacker then the defender's chance of winning jumps from 58% to 72%.

There are other factors that give either the attacker or the defender a bonus to their roll. Heavy cavalry will get +1 against Light cavalry or Lancers; Infantry deployed on the Approach (i.e. prepared) will get +1 against their opponent who is not; and so on.

In a straight infantry versus infantry fight, the loser will suffer a hit. For a fight involving cavalry though it gets more fun - if you lose against cavalry then you will suffer the difference in the rolls as hits - so this can get very messy for the loser. However, cavalry will suffer a hit even if they win - reflecting their status as very much one-shot weapons of the Napoleonic battlefield.

An example: A strength 2 infantry (not in square) is attacked by a strength 4 cavalry. The cavalry gets +4 to their roll, and the infantry gets +2. The infantry roll a 3, for a total of 5, but the cavalry roll a 4 for a total of 8. As this is cavalry winning, the infantry suffer the difference in hits - which is 3 (8-5=3). As the infantry are strength 2 then they can only take 2 hits, so they are eliminated (ridden down). The cavalry also suffer a hit, making them a bit weaker for any future combat.

There are more intricacies in combat, which I will cover later.
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David Kershaw
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Full combat process
How a combat takes shape is important - while the dice-off is the heart of the combat, it may never even come to that. A number of other decision points can shape the combat first.

1. As combat can involve multiple units, each side designates a lead unit. This is the one that will ultimately be involved in the dice-off, if it gets to that. There are some restrictions on the choice of a lead unit: For attackers, it cannot be a strength zero unit (a unit that is 1 hit away from elimination). For defenders, they cannot pick a unit deployed in square if another unit is available. For both sides, the unit that is deployed on the Approach between the attacking and defending area must be the lead unit (if there is one).

2. The defender may decide to retreat before combat. This is a typical tactic of light cavalry, whose main function is to delay and frustrate the enemy (sometimes also getting a chance to ride down battered units). In the game, the lead unit suffers a hit during this retreat, unless they are cavalry. The lead unit suffers an additional hit if the lead attacker is cavalry. So, you can see that cavalry can retreat without harm from infantry, but not from other cavalry. Infantry retreating from cavalry will suffer 2 hits, instead of only 1 retreating from infantry.

3. If there is no retreat before combat, then combat continues with defensive artillery firing (the attacker would have fired their artillery before the combat started). Artillery fire is a simple D6 roll. A roll of 4 or 5 inflicts a hit unless the target decides to retreat. A roll of 6 inflicts a hit and will also inflict an additional hit unless the target decides to retreat. It is therefore possible that defensive artillery will result in all attackers retreating and no further combat.

4. The final thing that could stop combat is a feint. This can only be performed if the lead defender is infantry. This essentially means that the attacker breaks off their attack. The effect of a feint is that the defender must place their lead infantry on the Approach facing where the attacker came from. This is important as it might then denude the defender of their best unit for another attack from a different area.

5. Then if combat is still on (no retreat before combat, attackers weren't all forced away by artillery, no feint) we have the dice-off - as described earlier in the thread.

6. After the dice off, the attacker may retreat all/any of their units (must include the lead unit). This means they can effectively remove their battered lead unit and replace it with a fresh one. Then, the defender may retreat any/all of their units (must include the lead unit) - bearing in mind that the defender retreating may suffer a hit. Alternatively, the defender may swap their lead unit for any cavalry unit (represents a cavalry charge).

7. If both sides still have units in the fight, then return to 5. for another dice-off. Combat continues until one side has either retreated all their units and/or they are eliminated.

8. A final step, after combat is concluded, is the winner may launch any of their cavalry at any adjacent enemy area (this represents a cavalry exploitation - breakthrough charge). This is then a new combat, but as it is a rapid breakthrough there are none of the pre-dice-off steps - it is straight to the action of the dice-off in step 5.

There are some details, such as artillery retreat and valid retreat paths, but that is pretty much it.
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Ilya Kudryashov
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Hi David
Do you need an artist for this PNP game?
;-)
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David Kershaw
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Ilya Kudriashov wrote:
Hi David
Do you need an artist for this PNP game?
;-)

I'll send you a geekmail. But the answer is "yes please"! I'm working on the counters at the moment, and they are a major pain for a non-artist like myself...
 
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David Kershaw
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Here is a history I wrote about the battle:

History of the Battle of Albuera

The battle of Albuera on the 16th of May 1811 formed part of the Napoleonic wars. The French Marshal Soult attempted to destroy an Allied (British-Portuguese-Spanish) army under British Marshal Beresford. Soult failed, but the slaughter was so great that the Allied army was in no condition to continue. It holds the dubious distinction as the single Napoleonic battle in Iberia with the highest proportion of casualties to combatants.

The battle was Soult’s attempt to use his numerically stronger army to defeat Beresford’s small British-Portuguese army and raise the siege of Badajoz. Soult had to move quickly before Blake’s Spanish army could reinforce Beresford. This rush meant that Soult’s army was top-heavy in cavalry, since it was easier to gather cavalry than infantry. The cavalry was good too, and included some of the best horsemen in Europe, the feared Polish Vistula Lancers.

Unfortunately for Soult, Blake arrived before him to join Beresford in position at Albuera (a position chosen some weeks earlier by Wellington as a good defensive spot to protect an attack towards Badajoz). For some unknown reason, even though he was no longer at an advantage, Soult decided to attack anyway. The reason for this is uncertain. It is unlikely that he was unaware of the Spanish forces, since they were in plain sight. It is more likely that hubris took over: The French had had a largely unbroken series of victories against Spanish armies, and held them in low regard. Soult’s battle plan emphasises this arrogance – a small force was to distract and pin the British-Portuguese at Albuera, while the majority of the army would sweep around the Southern flank and attack the Spanish. The assumption was likely that the Spanish would roll over, exposing the British-Portuguese who would have to flee or be caught in a pincer and eliminated. Soult was present at Austerlitz in 1805 and led the famous attack on the Pratzen heights that trapped the bulk of the Austro-Russian army against the frozen marshes to the South where they were crushed. Maybe Soult was trying to pull off his own Austerlitz at Albuera?

Unfortunately for Soult, his key assumption – that the Spanish would be easy to beat – was wrong. The Spanish flank was held by Zayas’ division which had probably the best Spanish soldiers in the entire country, and they were not going to be easy to beat.

Soult had divided his infantry into two groups:
Werle and Godinot demonstrated in front of Albuera, to keep the Allies distracted.
Girard and Gazan made a flank march to attack the Spanish from the South.

In this era of gaudy uniforms, surprise was difficult to achieve. The French flank march was spotted and the Spanish realigned Zayas to face the threat. The French attacked in columns, likely expecting minimal resistance. Instead they faced skillful skirmishing followed by disciplined volleys. The columns were ordered to deploy to line, but this was difficult to do under fire.

Meanwhile Stewart’s British 2nd division was moving South to assist the Spanish, they aligned behind the Spanish, but also a brigade (Colbourne’s) was able to enfilade the French flank to the West. The British fire on the flank added to the misery of the French - the situation looked bleak, but things were about to change in dramatic fashion.

French cavalry, including the fearsome Vistula Lancers, were lurking to the West as well. Taking advantage of one of the rain squalls that were sweeping the battlefield they pounced on Colbourne’s brigade, wiping it out in a matter of minutes. Cavalry even rode between the British and Spanish lines, who unwisely fired at it, inflicting more casualties on one-another than the cavalry before their officers could get them to ceasefire. Some cavalry even attacked the British and Spanish commands - Beresford himself had to manhandle a lancer who was attempting to lead him off captive.

The cavalry retired having effectively rescued the battle for Soult. The British replaced the Spanish in the firing line, the Spanish officers being at highly justified pains to make clear that they were only following orders to retire and not retreating. The firing continued, although at a less intense rate as the French attempted to restore order and bring up reserves.

The battle hung in the balance. The Allied line was secured at the flank by a square to see off cavalry, but their numbers were rapidly shrinking in the firefight while the French had more infantry to hand. Beresford therefore went off to see about getting some of the other Spanish forces forward, but communication difficulties prevented any progress. He then tried for the Portuguese at the Northern end of the battlefield, but had trouble locating them! While this shambles was going on it was left to the initiative of a junior staff officer, Henry Hardinge, who rode off and Persuaded Cole to send his division’s 2 brigades against the French flank where Colbourne had been slaughtered. Cole, having seen the damage the cavalry could do, was therefore careful to cover his flanks with infantry in square. This attack by Cole is the famous “charge of the fusiliers”, although that is a bit Anglo-centric since half the force was Portuguese. In fact, the Portuguese faced counterattacking charges by the French cavalry and bravely shrugged them off.

Soult sent his last reserve to face Cole. This was Werle, who had left the demonstration at Albuera to join the flank attack. But Werle’s forces could not match the British/Portuguese firepower (again, the French were stuck in columns unable to deploy effectively against the enemy lines). With the Allied forces now starting to get the upper hand, and with no more reserves, Soult withdrew. The allies attempted to follow up, but effective French cannon fire held them off.

Meanwhile, at the Northern end, a confusion where Beresford had ordered the Portuguese closer to Albuera, but the German soldiers in Albuera to the rear, had caused the brief loss of the village to the French before it was recaptured.

The battle was over. The Allies held the field, but Soult lingered for a few days before withdrawing. The slaughter had been terrible - a greater proportion of combatants (up to 25%) were casualties in this battle than in any other in the Peninsula war. Beresford was shocked and did not attempt to attack Soult, even when reinforced overnight by a fresh brigade (Kemmis).

When Wellington read Beresford’s gloomy report of the battle he was supposed to have said “This won't do …. Write me down a victory!”. Soult’s was equally despondent, writing “There is no beating these troops …. everywhere victory was mine – but they did not know how to run!”

The siege of Badajoz was abandoned.

Beresford was clearly not up to the stresses of independent field command and so remained at Wellington’s side throughout the rest of the war. As a fluent Portuguese speaker and the official commander in chief of the Portuguese army, he usually commanded their contingents and received several Portuguese titles. After the Napoleonic wars he meddled in Portuguese politics and ended up leaving the country, being appointed Governor of Jersey in the Channel Islands. He was engaged in heated 19th century pamphlet “flame wars” with historians regarding his performance in the battle of Albuera.

Soult remained in command but did not risk another battle in Spain. He fought in Germany during the retreats of 1813, before facing Wellington’s invasion of Southern France from liberated Spain and suffering defeat at Toulouse in 1814. He rallied to Napoleon’s side when Napoleon returned from exile in 1815 and was made Chief of Staff - a position he did not do well in. After Napoleon’s final defeat Soult somehow remained in favour becoming minister of war and even representing France at the coronation of Queen Victoria in London!

Blake (on the back of Zayas’ performance rather than his own) was promoted after the Battle, but his following career consisted of a series of defeats culminating in being captured at Valencia with his entire army in 1812. After the war he was made chief engineer of the Spanish army. Blake was half Irish, on his father’s side.

Zayas continued to fight under Blake, his forces often being the only bright spot in Blake’s defeats. Zayas was captured along with Blake in Valencia. He retired after the war, possibly to his native city of Havana, Cuba.
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David Kershaw
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Two more solo playthroughs to get the rules tighter. The game is very solo friendly.

Game 1: The French went for an unusually strong approach around the town, and got their cavalry across in Force to their left. British and Spanish light cavalry contested the French to the right, so the French suffered some losses forces their way forward:


The French cavalry seemed contained so the British send their Portuguese and Stewart's division to face the French to the right. Big mistake - an opportunistic attack by the French heavy cavalry eviscerated the Portuguese (in hindsight, they should have formed square since there were no French infantry). This handed the French the win, even though the British tried to regain the position:


Game 2: A more traditional French approach with a strong attack to the right - this time using their cavalry. The British launched an opportunistic attack across from Albuera, which did some damage:


Very attritional this game as both sides retreated away from threatening enemy attacks, which (almost) always causes losses. Finally, the French lost one unit too many, which collapsed their morale:


Quite happy, although I think that the morale rules need tweaking. Basically you lose morale each time you lose a unit. You gain it by taking an Area in combat - but not where there is retreat before combat. I might try changing this so that you gain morale even if there is retreat before combat - excepting the case of cavalry on their own retreating.
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I've done some more development = replacing the counters stolen from Napoleon's Triumph with some home-made ones. I use "funky foam" which is quite thick and you can write on it with a sharpie.

The counters are about 8mm thick (about 1/3 inch) and vary in length by type: Infantry are the longest (about 1.5 inches = 38mm) while cavalry are 1 inch and artillery are 1/2 inch.

Also I have used different colours for the 4 major nationalities:

Blue for the French (I could use green for the Polish lancers)
Pink for the British, including KGL (the shop had run out of red)
White for the Spanish
Brown for the Portuguese (couldn't really use blue, even though that was the colour of the standard Portuguese uniform, since that would confuse with the French. Brown is the colour that the Portuguese light troops used though, so it's not too bad a choice)

This helps to quickly visually identify the two sides by colour and the 3 key types by size (cavalry, infantry and artillery).

In addition, I think it is fun to see the different nationalities: The reliable British, the Spanish with their mix of good and terrible units, the Portuguese smugly sitting at the safe end of the battlefield.

While there are several numbers/letters on the counters, the only one that matters in gameplay is the single number on the left, which is the unit starting strength (it is reduced by indication of a damage counter placed on the unit). Note that artillery have no strength, they are either limbered or deployed (which I have drawn on the 2 different sides of the counter). The other numbers/letters just indicate the unit ID for setup purposes and also a bit of historical flavour.

Damage counters, and counters representing units that have formed square are currently small decorative glass tiles. You can also write on these so units will, at most, have 2 counters on them (damage and square formation).

The picture below shows them:


In the game above, the French won a major victory. The allies prepared what they thought was a good defence: An infantry in line (on the approach) facing the French infantry, then an infantry in square in the Area, protecting from cavalry which, with the greater movement, might strike the flanks. Artillery could also boost this defence (Interestingly, in the actual battle, the British 4th Division took this approach, but on the attack).

However, in this game you are never as safe as you think. The French gambled on attacking a weak Spanish square with their elite Vistula Lancers. This succeeded and opened up the Allied line to a ferocious French offensive which the Allies were unable to recover from.

Victory is determined by morale. Each side starts with 10 morale. Each unit lost causes morale to drop by an amount equal to the strength of the unit. However, morale can be gained by causing the enemy to retreat. The game ended with the French on 11 morale and the Allies on zero.
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David Kershaw
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Lines of Battle: Quatre Bras 1815. Brunswick hussar.
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Here's my first draft at the proper counters. Allies in green, French in sky-blue:


Still need to do damage markers, limbered and square markers.

NB - all images are adapted from ones in Junior General.

EDIT: Added damage, square, morale and limbered markers
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David Kershaw
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I've put the rules online.

They are a PDF viewable/downloadable here: www.kerpob.com/games/LOBv1.pdf

I would be very grateful for any review/comments about them.
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David Kershaw
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New map artwork - this is just a preview of part of the map as it is still WIP:

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Robert DeLeskie
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Really nice David!
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David Kershaw
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Alas - not ready for this years' competition. Still actively developing the game though. Hope to be playtest ready soon-ish.
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David Kershaw
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Still in development...

Here are new counters in action:



I played a game F2F yesterday. It lasted an hour and ended in a French victory. I was the allies, and was consistently manoeuvred out of position, retiring with losses until my army broke.

French army was pretty battered, so I don't feel too bad. The killer move was the two French Dragoon brigades overrunning some Spanish and breakthrough charging against a British brigade deployed facing the wrong way, flanking it and wiping it out.
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