Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 Hide
17 Posts

Yspahan» Forums » Reviews

Subject: An honest, average dice game rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Snowball
Belgium
n/a
flag msg tools
badge
Gender: pot*ato. My opinion is an opinion.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The core of Yspahan is simple to explain; a bunch of dice are rolled, then they are grouped by value and placed in the levels of a tower; the number of dice in the levels dictates how powerful the associated action will be.
There are 5 types of actions: taking gold, camels and placing cubes in sectors of Yspahan are all linked with a particular level of the tower, while moving the overseer and taking a card are things you can do whatever the level of the tower you select.
Placing cubes in the city will grant you victory points for completed sub-sectors (called souks), and sending goods with the overseer to the caravan will also grant points.
You can also have special powers with cards you draw and with some building you can build.

At the start of the week, a lucky roll for the first player has a quite huge impact, so I feel the luck factor is quite high; the dices you are left with on your turn dictate what you do mre or less effectively; of course you can decide to build stuff or to move the overseer, but the impact of these tactical choices is pretty close to nothing in comparison to the effetcs of a good dice roll.
I loved the game the first session we played it because I thought there were a lot of possibilities, so maybe I set my expectations too high; now, I am not that eager to play it. There are good ideas in Yspahan, but I feel that the dice system, while interesting, is at odds with the rest. It is a missed opportunity for a good game.

Component-wise, the game is very attractive; I liked the bright color scheme used, and the cameeples.
The rulebook could be more clear. Repetition of a few words here and there would have increased the rules clarity, and I even found a grammar error (I loathe that, especially when a spell checker would have found it); of course I am referring to the french rules, so this might not be true for your copy.

In conclusion, I think that Yspahan is original, but the luck factor was too high for me; it would have been better without the cards and the buildings, leaving no doubt about it's core nature: a light dice game.
Usually I find the production values of Ystari games to be near perfect, but this time there is clearly room for improving the rules.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Champion Eternal
Malaysia
Unspecified
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yet it is a Spiel des Jahres 2007 nominee?

I agree with your comment on the luck factor. That's one reason why I did not get it.

Further comments here:
http://ofgamesandotherfings.blogspot.com/
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Al Johnson
United States
Arlington
Texas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
There is luck, but in most games there is - even "heavy" games. The throw of the dice for resource location in Age of Steam, the Power Plant draw in Power Grid, the draw of tiles in Tigris and Euphrates, etc. The trick is how you respond to it. I look at it a lot like I look at life - bad things happen, how can you overcome them. That's the thrill I get when I play games with some "luck" factor. Of course, give me a game with zero luck (Caylus, Puerto Rico) and I'll play anytime.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nate Straight

Covington
Louisiana
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmb
HavocIsHere wrote:
I loved the game the first session we played it because I thought there were a lot of possibilities, so maybe I set my expectations too high; now, I am not that eager to play it. There are good ideas in Yspahan, but I feel that the dice system, while interesting, is at odds with the rest. It is a missed opportunity for a good game.

This is pretty much how I reacted to / feel about the game as well.

I got interested in it because of Scott Nicholson's video and because of the apparent variety of different paths to victory (I LOVE games that offer a wide number of paths to victory: Settlers of Catan, Puerto Rico, etc). All the reviews and hype made it sound very good, too.

I downloaded the free computer version and was massively underwhelmed.

You just don't get enough control over your destiny to make the possibility of pursuing the various paths to victory legitimate. You're basically reacting to die rolls the entire game. There's almost never a reason to take a poorer die roll "because it helps your strategy."

You could convince me to buy the game, but only if it was a huge deal.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Maarten D. de Jong
Netherlands
Zaandam
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
My first response to this 'review' was 'How the hell did this crap get through GeekMod?'. It's not a review; it's an opinion, and not even a fairly objective one at that.

NateStraight wrote:
HavocIsHere wrote:
I loved the game the first session we played it because I thought there were a lot of possibilities, so maybe I set my expectations too high; now, I am not that eager to play it. There are good ideas in Yspahan, but I feel that the dice system, while interesting, is at odds with the rest. It is a missed opportunity for a good game.
This is pretty much how I reacted to / feel about the game as well.
Unfortunately, this misses the point entirely. The dice are what makes Yspahan; if you remove them, you end up with a sterile and boring VP conversion-machine like Notre Dame. You are at liberty to think 'yech, dice' in all its gradations, but without them, the game isn't Yspahan anymore.

In addition, the OP mentions that he'd rather leave out cards and buildings and turn Yspahan into a light dice game. Well, if you kill those, you really are at the mercy of the dice, with no way to compensate for lousy rolls. I doubt the game would be fun then.

Quote:
I got interested in it because of Scott Nicholson's video and because of the apparent variety of different paths to victory (I LOVE games that offer a wide number of paths to victory: Settlers of Catan, Puerto Rico, etc). All the reviews and hype made it sound very good, too.
Somehow I find it amusing that you condemn Yspahan for not having sufficient paths to victory, and then bring up the even more dicey and dice-driven nightmare that is Settlers of Catan as an example of what you consider to be a good example in this class. And adding a heavyweight like PR into the comparison is not very fair---yesyes, it's just to show the 'multiple paths to victory'-thing, but something as simple as Yspahan cannot have the number of paths a heavyweight like PR does.

Quote:
I downloaded the free computer version and was massively underwhelmed.
Unfortunately, the computer game version is not particularly strong nor clever. If this is all you played, then I recommend you go out and play a few games F2F. Winning at Yspahan against people who know the game is definitely not an easy job.

Quote:
You just don't get enough control over your destiny to make the possibility of pursuing the various paths to victory legitimate. You're basically reacting to die rolls the entire game. There's almost never a reason to take a poorer die roll "because it helps your strategy."
First, see the above comment on SoC. How do you not 'react to dice all the time' in that game? Second, I fail to see what is wrong with chosing a 'poor' die-roll if it helps your strategy: it sounds like a good die-roll to me! If you mean that you'll have to weigh in the fact that the remaining dice will help your opponent more than what you want to chose will help you... Well, c'est la vie---how often do you run into this situation with, for example, Puerto Rico, and what do you do then? Finally, if you claim that you can always pick 'the best' dice without paying attention to what you are attempting to achieve, you really need to play against someone of flesh and blood. Apart from lucky die rolls---which can always skew a game no matter what---I guarantee you'll be shown all corners of the board until you begin to pay attention to the subtler points in this game.

My 0,02 .
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nate Straight

Covington
Louisiana
msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmb
cymric wrote:
Unfortunately, this misses the point entirely. The dice are what makes Yspahan; if you remove them, you end up with a sterile and boring VP conversion-machine like Notre Dame. You are at liberty to think 'yech, dice' in all its gradations, but without them, the game isn't Yspahan anymore.

I understand this... I certainly wouldn't want to try to play the game without the dice. It's a very clever thing, I just don't see it working out that well in the plays I've made.

Quote:
Somehow I find it amusing that you condemn Yspahan for not having sufficient paths to victory, and then bring up the even more dicey and dice-driven nightmare that is Settlers of Catan as an example of what you consider to be a good example in this class. And adding a heavyweight like PR into the comparison is not very fair---yes yes, it's just to show the 'multiple paths to victory'-thing, but something as simple as Yspahan cannot have the number of paths a heavyweight like PR does.

It's not the presence of dice that I don't like in Yspahan, it's the way the dice end up affecting your ability to pursue the multiple paths to victory that seem to present themselves to you.

In Settlers, you can get screwed by a bunch of bad die rolls, but clever players will begin to make up for this by choosing initial settlements wisely. In Yspahan, if you're not the starting player, there's a very good chance you'll only have a selection of one-die actions available to you. There's just not enough that you can do with one action per turn. You can't possibly pursue any type of strategy with such a limited array of possible actions each turn.

Quote:
Unfortunately, the computer game version is not particularly strong nor clever. If this is all you played, then I recommend you go out and play a few games F2F. Winning at Yspahan against people who know the game is definitely not an easy job.

I haven't even come close to beating the computer yet, and I've tried it on 2, 3, and 4 player games at all difficulty levels. It's not the difficulty or lack thereof that concerns me.

Quote:
First, see the above comment on SoC. How do you not 'react to dice all the time' in that game?

In Settlers, there are things you can do to allay poor dice rolls. I don't see anything of this nature in Yspahan. If you get stuck with only one-die actions to choose from, tough luck to you... and it happens a lot. Plus, in Settlers you can trade (so even if you get lousy rolls, if your lousy rolls are producing a resource that everyone else wants, you can wheel and deal to get your way).

Quote:
Second, I fail to see what is wrong with chosing a 'poor' die-roll if it helps your strategy: it sounds like a good die-roll to me! If you mean that you'll have to weigh in the fact that the remaining dice will help your opponent more than what you want to chose will help you... Well, c'est la vie---how often do you run into this situation with, for example, Puerto Rico, and what do you do then? Finally, if you claim that you can always pick 'the best' dice without paying attention to what you are attempting to achieve, you really need to play against someone of flesh and blood. Apart from lucky die rolls---which can always skew a game no matter what---I guarantee you'll be shown all corners of the board until you begin to pay attention to the subtler points in this game.

I admit I haven't figured out the strategies of the game at all, but the die mechanic, though clever, just doesn't seem to work out in practice. The first player gets good pickings, and everyone else gets screwed, generally. The problem is that the chances of there being either enough different actions to go around or enough dice on enough actions to make your choices relevant are just too small. The actions that turn-up with a bunch of dice usually get taken by the starting player and the second player and everyone else doesn't get much to choose from (because the three or four dice on a few actions leave only one die each for the two or three remaining actions). I think I might like it better if there were just more dice to go around. It feels way too constricted.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Snowball
Belgium
n/a
flag msg tools
badge
Gender: pot*ato. My opinion is an opinion.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
cymric wrote:
My first response to this 'review' was 'How the hell did this crap get through GeekMod?'. It's not a review; it's an opinion, and not even a fairly objective one at that.
There is no need to be offensive. As for my objectivity, your opinion on the subject does not seem to be very objective neither... do you suggest that I have and agenda or something? I explained what I found good and what I found not so good about Yspahan, of course it is my opinion, but I did not write 'this game is crap', if you understand my meaning.
Reviews are all about opinions; it is a review, not a game description; it describes what I feel and think about the game, it is not an alternative to the rule set. When I read a review, I see how the author rated other games I know, it gives me a fairly good guess about my future appreciation of the game.
Even though you can say you did not make and "ad hominem" attack, it is a disguised one; the fact that you replied that way because you do not agree with what I wrote is extremely rude.
7 
 Thumb up
0.27
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Snowball
Belgium
n/a
flag msg tools
badge
Gender: pot*ato. My opinion is an opinion.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Al Johnson wrote:
There is luck, but in most games there is
My problem was not the mere presence of luck.
I mean, as soon I knew there were dice, I knew there has to be some luck involved.
My problem is that there are decisions to be made, options to be analysed, but yet the outcome seemed to be dictated by the dice; for instance, a good start in the north east quarter seems really difficult to overcome.
I like game with much more luck, even games that are mostly luck, but then I do not get the impression that I can manage the bad draws/rolls/whatever.
Of course, you can be incredibly unlucky with Catan as well, but usually the one player who makes the best deals and takes the best decisions will win.
As for Tigris and Euphrates, it is an example of a game where, depending on what you draw, you have to alter you strategy or even change it dramatically; sure, in the unlikely event that you never get any red tile, you will most probably loose, but when I won I never had the impression that I was particularly lucky, and when I lost, I can only blame myself.
I bought Yspahan exactly to see how dice would mix with an euro this time, and I am not happy with the result.
Champion Eternal wrote:
Yet it is a Spiel des Jahres 2007 nominee?

I agree with your comment on the luck factor. That's one reason why I did not get it.

Further comments here:
http://ofgamesandotherfings.blogspot.com/
I read the article. I do not know about Arkadia, but I wrote a review (another crappy opiniated rant ) of Zooloretto; I think it would be a fairly good pick for the SDJ.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John W
United States
Sacramento
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
NateStraight wrote:
You just don't get enough control over your destiny to make the possibility of pursuing the various paths to victory legitimate. You're basically reacting to die rolls the entire game. There's almost never a reason to take a poorer die roll "because it helps your strategy."
If you learned how to play the caravan strategy, you would see how it accomplishes what you're looking for.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Big Woo
Scotland
state:
running out of space...
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
Hi HavocIsHere,

so far it has surprised me how well this game has gone down in our group and on BGG. It seems to have a lot of BGG preconceived misgivings stacked against it, yet somehow the general response has been more than just a bit positive. Good to hear an opinionated review of someone who must voice the concerns and impressions of those at the other end of the scale, even if I disagree.

I actually think is one of those rare games that relies on more dice than Yahtzee yet somehow has a variety of mechanics that enable creative players various avenues to deal with it well. Sure, someone can face the sort of luck can put a brick wall across any skilful approach route to victory, but on the whole that doesn't happen, and since the time investment is kept admirably in the filler camp, it seems that most people accept that as a statistical quirk that doesn't stop them from wanting to play it again. It appears that most people judge that, on balance, the fun they have experienced with this one in the past heavily outweighs the frustrating occasions that the gods have ripped out the Laws of Averages out of the cosmic manual. I even know players who relish the challenge of beating those kind of odds. And have fun regardless how successful that was in the end.

I find Yspahan a breath of fresh air, a game that tries to do something different by making die-rolls the centre around which the entire euro revolves itself. I did make me smile to note that Champion Eternal on the one hand bemoans the stale state of Euro design on his blog and then ignores that, like or dislike, this isn't simply a rehash of well-trodden euro terrain. I can understand why people don't click with this one on a personal level, but if you fail to acknowledge its evident appeal, or wonder why this is on the 2007 Spiel des Jahres shortlist, than you show a complete lack of understanding regarding the nature of that prize, and its intended target audience. You ain't it.

I suspect that exactly because this game is different, and has enough under its bonnet to charm its way out of accusations of shortcomings that are usually deemed fatal, it is striking a note with many, even here on BGG. It certainly helps that it has pitched its general playing time perfectly. If this game would take as long as a game of Euphrat & Tigres its support would plummet.

I disagree with your assessment that the game's outcome (who is the winner) is heavily determined by the dice rolls, if you are also suggesting that, what you indirectly imply, skill doesn't play an even larger part.

I do agree that you cannot go into this game with a set strategy. Everything you do is reactive, and each roll will force you to evaluate if your current goal is still the best one. How good is that?!

I completely fail to see why taking a "bad roll" (which I presume is one that doesn't get you lots of things) doesn't occur, as in any game there will be key moments in which the "bad option" is actually by far the best one open to you, even if you leave those 5 camels to someone else. Reading other player's goals and spotting the Achilles heel is more skill dependent than dice dependent. If you can turn their Achilles heel into your crowning moment you'll be a force to reckon with.

Quote:
I like game with much more luck, even games that are mostly luck, but then I do not get the impression that I can manage the bad draws/rolls/whatever.
That to me suggests you are you are missing some core strategies and viable paths to victories, either through wrong pick-up choices, by underestimating the power of certain moves, or by thinking of each turn as an equal blank canvas to all players at the same time, and then get disappointed when you miss out in one turn.

I find it interesting how each player sits in a different part of the turn order cycle throughout the game, offering its unique opportunities and restrictions. Figuring out what to do when, and to whom, is just one of the many things that you'll need to consider. Knowing how to deal with a dry patch, or even actively timing it so it has little effect, is part and parcel of Yspahan. How that turn order cycle impacts the week cycle is yet another layer that intrigues me.

I guess this is also why so many people are intrigued by it, but accept it just doesn't do it for you.

Quote:
My problem is that there are decisions to be made, options to be analysed, but yet the outcome seemed to be dictated by the dice; for instance, a good start in the north east quarter seems really difficult to overcome.
Nope. Other people will on balance get lucky breaks as well. Someone getting a good start in the north east. OK, one turn that will help them in one of 3 rounds, but not to the point that it decides the game winner. Actually, it probably is a good opportunity for the player with the caravan strategy to put the pressure on for a much larger part of the game, and with higher stakes! If you can't see how that would work out, you haven't looked at this game proper yet. Getting a good break in the NE goes hand in hand with having to keep resources back from development, or use an entire pick-up to defend it, or worse, another turn to reinstate that lucky break... Turns are precious here and if the other players can't reign in an obvious leader, someone isn't doing their homework, or that leader does indeed deserve to win, despite a lucky roll at the start of the game.

Quote:
In Settlers, there are things you can do to allay poor dice rolls. I don't see anything of this nature in Yspahan. If you get stuck with only one-die actions to choose from, tough luck to you... and it happens a lot. Plus, in Settlers you can trade (so even if you get lousy rolls, if your lousy rolls are producing a resource that everyone else wants, you can wheel and deal to get your way).
Sorry, that isn't a bad roll, that's a great roll. It's a trading game! Good and bad is defined by its usefulness in its context. Same for Yspahan. A bad roll in Settlers is one that doesn't produce when you have nothing in your hands. A bad spell is when that happens over multiple rolls. If you play it as much as you like it, the you must have sat through complete turn-cycles in which you didn't get to pick up a single resource and "pass" really was the only option available. That cannot happen in Yspahan.

Don't forget, Yspahan always guarantees you get something out of a turn, even if it is "just" a card Man, you can muck about with the cards here, and more so if you have multiple ones to play. Reactionary again, but so what. I don't mind shifting sand if it makes the terrain more interesting, and here it certainly does.

Better, simply use hand cards to adjust another "bad" pick-up where you could do with an extra dice of a certain type. Another mechanic that allows you to deal with pesky dice rolls! All good in my book.

I am not saying that your arguments are groundless, but picking Settlers as a counter example of the same thing done right misses the plank by a fair bit.

Quote:
Of course, you can be incredibly unlucky with Catan as well, but usually the one player who makes the best deals and takes the best decisions will win.
Funny. I and other are echoing similar sentiments about Yspahan, yet you refute them. What is deluding us?

Quote:
As for Tigris and Euphrates, it is an example of a game where, depending on what you draw, you have to alter you strategy or even change it dramatically. sure, in the unlikely event that you never get any red tile, you will most probably loose, but when I won I never had the impression that I was particularly lucky, and when I lost, I can only blame myself.
I'm echoing my echo.

In our group, no-one wins without having been made to work hard, regardless of die-rolls. Although they can help. If there is one argument you can make about Yspahan is that communally starving one player of options or key resources will wipe that player out, but it is hardly unique in that.

Quote:
I bought Yspahan exactly to see how dice would mix with an euro this time, and I am not happy with the result.
That seems a perfectly fair statement. I can fully understand why people do not click with this game when others do. But based on your comments I am left with the impression you are not making the most of the options available to you in your turn, and that you switch off through alleged shortcomings that don't bother you in other games you like.

Join the club!
3 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Len Robinson
Canada
Lethbridge
Alberta
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
NateStraight wrote:

I haven't even come close to beating the computer yet, and I've tried it on 2, 3, and 4 player games at all difficulty levels. It's not the difficulty or lack thereof that concerns me.

In Settlers, there are things you can do to allay poor dice rolls. I don't see anything of this nature in Yspahan. If you get stuck with only one-die actions to choose from, tough luck to you... and it happens a lot. Plus, in Settlers you can trade (so even if you get lousy rolls, if your lousy rolls are producing a resource that everyone else wants, you can wheel and deal to get your way).

But there are things you can do to allay poor dice rolls. I found some tips on BGG that allow me to beat the computer consistently on 'high' difficulty levels with 2,3 or 4 players. When you "get stuck with only one-die actions" there are alternatives that make sense and will lead to a winning game. Like you, I love Settlers but Yspahan is, in my opinion, less luck-dependent, not more.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Snowball
Belgium
n/a
flag msg tools
badge
Gender: pot*ato. My opinion is an opinion.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
BigWoo wrote:


I actually think is one of those rare games that relies on more dice than Yahtzee yet somehow has a variety of mechanics that enable creative players various avenues to deal with it well. Sure, someone can face the sort of luck can put a brick wall across any skilful approach route to victory, but on the whole that doesn't happen, and since the time investment is kept admirably in the filler camp, it seems that most people accept that as a statistical quirk that doesn't stop them from wanting to play it again. It appears that most people judge that, on balance, the fun they have experienced with this one in the past heavily outweighs the frustrating occasions that the gods have ripped out the Laws of Averages out of the cosmic manual. I even know players who relish the challenge of beating those kind of odds. And have fun regardless how successful that was in the end.
Please understand that I do not find Yspahan to be a bad game (I rate it a 6); I find it original enough and I am certainly willing to play further.
When I say the dice seem at odds with the rest of the game, I do not suggest that the dice should go; I mean either the dice go and are replaced by something analytical, or the dice stay but the game is somehow trimmed of some of its less used stuff.
Hm in fact I do not suggest anything like that, I am just describing the possibilities that would have suited me more
I cannot figure for example when it is sensible to use the caravan; of course you can annoy your oponents if they have no camels, but sending your own stuff to the caravan seems a waste of turns to me (if you just need one more to get a X 3 multiplier, that would be useful, but I did not see that situation arise in the five or so games I played).
It is just too much; the game could have been a bit more streamlined. I like heavier euros, but that dice system classify Yspahan in the light games. Yes, I am aware of that caravan strategy, but without it the game is easier on the occasionnal gamer; with dice, the game does deter some of the people... the choice should have been made between these two elements.
I might be wrong, but I think that the game would have had more chance to get the SDJ award by removing the barely useful caravan.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jeff W
United States
Parker
Colorado
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
HavocIsHere wrote:

I cannot figure for example when it is sensible to use the caravan; of course you can annoy your oponents if they have no camels, but sending your own stuff to the caravan seems a waste of turns to me

Interesting. It seems like the current concensus is that the Caravan might be a bit too powerful. Most beginners totally ignore the Caravan. Perhaps it is the fault of the game that such a powerful strategy is not readily apparent. Though I do like games with subtle powerful strategies.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Was George Orwell an Optimist?
United States
Corvallis
Oregon
flag msg tools
Sonny Rollins - A Night at the Village Vanguard
badge
Gates of Eden - Ethan Coen
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The caravan strategy isn't too powerful once all the players realize that it is powerful.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Snowball
Belgium
n/a
flag msg tools
badge
Gender: pot*ato. My opinion is an opinion.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Once a player uses the caravan consistently, everybody is more or less forced to do so.
I fail to see how it does enrich the game.
Maybe it is indeed a subtle thing that eluded me; then it is probably too subtle for a game where luck has a considerable impact.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris
United States
Cheektowaga
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I see the caravan strategy as being a way for experienced players to pound the crap out of new players. The Caravan Strategy doesn't work as well against experienced players as they tend see it coming and can play it also. It is an extremely powerful strategy in this game but one that all experienced players know to use. I for one rated this game a 5. (which I have taken some heat for lol but that is my opinion of the game shake )

As for Cymrics comment about this not being a review and how did it get past geekmod you seem to not understand the way "Reviews" are done here (which I can't understand as you have written 5 very good ones yourself). This is an Unbiased Review of a game that Havoc has played. It is his opinions of the game and that is what a review here on the geek is. Most people when they review state what they feel about the components and the gameplay. also Merriam-Websters defines a Review as 6a : a critical evaluation.
This is exactly that.

Havoc I have only one suggestion and that is to be careful when not rating this game a 8 or better (or any game in the top 20). This game has ALOT of fanboys and they tend to get nasty when you don't like their game cry . Not sure why they feel that everyone must like the same games as them. (I got alot of heat for Battlelore not getting a 9 rating also).

Also just my opinion but I hate the theme of this game gulp

Ok let the flames begin (to prove my point )
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Rudram
Canada
Victoria
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I found the caravan a great way to smooth out the luck of the game. You can use the overseer to load the caravan, and then be pretty sure that any die roll will move your over seer outside a souk that contains your products.

There is chance, but I think it's a game where you manage the chance and smooth it out with your actions.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls