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Subject: A "classfull" of 11 year olds rss

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Bruce Oppenheim
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OK, so this is not actually an in school question - but I have 20ish 11 year old girls coming round for a Birthday party and the weather forecast isn't looking good.
Any suggestions for games for them to play? They all know (and play) Mafia at school, but I suspect this will be a bit too many for it.
Any suggestions?

(I know this is a non school question, but the numbers are similar and I am a teacher, so I hope the question seems OK!)

Thanks,

Bruce
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Charles Waterman
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Reverse Charades (4 groups of 5 competing)
Bingo
Apples to Apples (Jr?) (Split them up into 2 or three groups)
Telestrations (2 groups - you'd need two sets of the Party version that plays 12)

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Charles Waterman
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Three decks of Tempurrrra (7 players can play each set)
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Lindsay Scholle
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I think the splitting them up into teams is definitely the way to go. It's hard to keep them all engaged them when you have more than about 10, but being a school teacher you probably have your tricks of the trade. Last year we had a similar number of 12 year old girls and boys and split them into three teams and rooms with three escape room puzzles built for them out of game parts, each with a different theme. Puzzles were kept rather sequential for simplicity and included Ubongo 3D, Professor Pünschge, Pharaoh Code, Villa Paletti, a Quadrilla set (the marble path construction set), Lego™, a remote control car, some selected Trivial Pursuit cards, some Scrabble tiles, an electrical circuit set, a few cardboard boxes with number locks, magnets, mirrors, poster tubes, etc. You'll need an evening to plan it all out and test it, then one person to supervise (and sometimes steer) each room come game day. Time them and then swap them around. Lowest cumulative time wins. Each of our rooms took about 25 minutes to complete and five minutes to set up again. That seemed about right. Competitive spirit (and a prize on offer), had them fully focused on the task.

Failing that we just had a 10 year old party with two teams filming on an iPhone each and then editing the footage on two laptops to show a movie trailer. All the kids had done a bit of video editing at school, so they seemed to know their way around the software without much guidance. The editing process took about half the time and was a two or three person job, so I'd suggest the other team members be kept active creating movie posters for the presentation.

I could even see two groups playing Codenames and being entertained for an hour or so. Maybe Codenames in one room and something like Pow Wow in another.

Good luck!
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Roger Fawcett
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Lots of party games would work in small groups including Gambit 7 which I have used with almost this number before. Alternatively a round robin of different dexterity games from Jenga to Tumblin' Dice.

I have, at a youth group in the past, divided a large group into two teams and got hold of lots of very fast two player games e.g. Noughts & Crosses (Tic Tac Toe), Buckaroo, Operation, Pop-up pirate, etc. Lots of these are available in second hand stores. You then divide the group into two teams, one on the inside of a horseshoe of tables and one on the outside. The two teams play each other in pairs for 4-5 minutes calling out whenever one of them wins a game. After a few minutes move round to a new partner. You or somebody keeps the score in the meta-game between the two teams.

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Dan
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Codenames
Incan Gold
Wits & Wagers
Spoons
Charades

I would put all of these at 10 max per game. Hope you have large tables and lots of chairs.

The name game is the only one I have played that goes up to 20 players. Quite good. http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/the-name-game

Another one is Two Rooms and a Boom, but I've never played it myself.
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David Larson
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My colleague plays The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow with her class of 25 12 year-old kids. They love it. I've been lucky enough to sit in on a few rounds, too.
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Amirabutwo wrote:
My colleague plays The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow with her class of 25 12 year-old kids. They love it. I've been lucky enough to sit in on a few rounds, too.


I did this with my daughter's similarly-sized birthday group. They seemed to enjoy it, although I toned down the werewolf part to something less violent, so I didn't have to explain to parents why were were playing at killing each other.

whistle
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Bruce Oppenheim
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Thanks all - great ideas.
I will go look for reverse charades and ultimate werewolf tomorrow!
 
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Bruce Oppenheim
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Scholle wrote:
I think the splitting them up into teams is definitely the way to go. It's hard to keep them all engaged them when you have more than about 10, but being a school teacher you probably have your tricks of the trade. Last year we had a similar number of 12 year old girls and boys and split them into three teams and rooms with three escape room puzzles built for them out of game parts, each with a different theme. Puzzles were kept rather sequential for simplicity and included Ubongo 3D, Professor Pünschge, Pharaoh Code, Villa Paletti, a Quadrilla set (the marble path construction set), Lego™, a remote control car, some selected Trivial Pursuit cards, some Scrabble tiles, an electrical circuit set, a few cardboard boxes with number locks, magnets, mirrors, poster tubes, etc. You'll need an evening to plan it all out and test it, then one person to supervise (and sometimes steer) each room come game day. Time them and then swap them around. Lowest cumulative time wins. Each of our rooms took about 25 minutes to complete and five minutes to set up again. That seemed about right. Competitive spirit (and a prize on offer), had them fully focused on the task.

Failing that we just had a 10 year old party with two teams filming on an iPhone each and then editing the footage on two laptops to show a movie trailer. All the kids had done a bit of video editing at school, so they seemed to know their way around the software without much guidance. The editing process took about half the time and was a two or three person job, so I'd suggest the other team members be kept active creating movie posters for the presentation.

I could even see two groups playing Codenames and being entertained for an hour or so. Maybe Codenames in one room and something like Pow Wow in another.

Good luck!


Wow these ideas are amazing - I love the escape room concepts!!! Will have to think if I can be clever enough - maybe next year!
 
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