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Subject: How much of this game is luck based? Or is it like a "puzzle? rss

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Im wondering if the decisions made are meaningful in this game or if its mostly a narrative "story" game that plays itself.




 
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Steve Fliss
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Sterling
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All of the decisions you make as the company commander are meaningful. Murphy, or luck, is always present with the card draws and rarely can you execute your plan as intended. There is no narrative driving the game events, the narrative comes from the decisions you make and how the enemy acts/reacts. No other game in my experience captures the role of a company commander in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam as well as This game does.
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Marco
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The decisions are meaningful...it is a very tough game...if you have enough time, buy it.

A very cool feature is that you generate the map by using cards...that ensures tons of replayability...
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Peter Kossits
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The game punishes bad decisions quite ruthlessly. The puzzle is different each time.
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Corporal Dave
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There are no 'rails' in the game. The map is different as is the enemy. Your decisions are crucial, although you may get a crappy die roll (card draw) sometimes- just like in real life. What you do is up to you and what the enemy does is not.

If the choice is luck versus puzzle, I'd choose puzzle. But I think that oversimplifies what happens.
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Chris Montgomery
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Bezmozgu wrote:
All of the decisions you make as the company commander are meaningful. Murphy, or luck, is always present with the card draws and rarely can you execute your plan as intended. There is no narrative driving the game events, the narrative comes from the decisions you make and how the enemy acts/reacts. No other game in my experience captures the role of a company commander in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam as well as This game does.


And perhaps even more awesomely - the game comes with THREE campaigns of 10 scenarios each. I mean, most games would have divided this up into two or three releases. If you are a solo gamer with interest in WWII company level actioons and you have time for long (4-6 hr) sessions, this game is totally for you.
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Robert Fabbro
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Though I have struggled with the rulebook, this game is like no other I have experienced.

Decisions are often excruciating, especially as the friction of war takes over and your chain of command starts to break down.

No other game I have ever played has shown the importance of command control so well.



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Christopher O
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Blacksmith61 wrote:

No other game I have ever played has shown the importance of command control so well.


With the caveat "at the tactical level", seconded.
 
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Chris Wood
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Leander
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I am also considering this game. I watched Chris Hobbs's videos to help me decide (these are linked off the GMT page, and probably elsewhere) - http://www.gmtgames.com/p-322-fields-of-fire-2nd-edition.asp...

These are excellent videos that walk through an entire game, and I highly recommend them. You will probably be able to tell whether it's for you after a video or two.
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Cole Dano
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With that caveat in mind, what do you think shows C&C well at larger scale?
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Daniel Schulz
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HorizonMan wrote:
With that caveat in mind, what do you think shows C&C well at larger scale?


This game doesn't model larger scale at all. The magic here is keeping your units in communication at a tactical level. Radios and field phones (and phone lines) are represented, as are separation of individual units within a terrain feature. You can risk keeping your units concentrated (and thus in command), or spread them out for lower risk, but less control. You can send a small unit out to scout a terrain feature, thus leaving him out of command, and vulnerable, but preserving your larger unit if something bad happens (like a minefield, or ambush). You can set up generic commands using star clusters and smoke signals to give commands to otherwise out of communications units. For example if you designate a red star cluster means 'pull back', you could get that out of command squad back with his unit. The trick is, every unit with an LOS to that star cluster will be required to execute that command. To mitigate this somewhat, you can make more complex rules, like 'red star cluster means pull back if out of communication with a higher unit.' Units open fire automatically when they spot an enemy, and they will continue to fire (even if the enemy disappears). The only way to get them to stop is to execute a cease fire order. Incoming fire is abstracted into several categories such as small arms, automatic, heavy weapons, crossfire, ect. As such, if you have all of your heavy weapons firing into one area, it doesn't increase the effect on the target. One heavy weapon is as good as three. Therefore, you've got to control how your units engage the enemy, and not just pile on fire like in other wargames. Despite what some people think, this is very realistic. This game plays more like the real thing than any other wargame I've played, including computer wargames.
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David Janik-Jones
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Waterloo
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HorizonMan wrote:
With that caveat in mind, what do you think shows C&C well at larger scale?

Part of the elegance and uniqueness of this game is that it doesn't allow you do see the c-and-c at higher levels. It puts you squarely in the role of a Company commander. You are responsible for the orders you give to your platoon commanders (and obviously, take their actions for them) but except for the Battalion HQ and/or staff screaming at you to do things you often don't have time for now, there is no other c-and-c. As it probably should be in wargames ... no need to have control two or three steps up and down a chain of command. Command a company as best you can, and get the job done. I can't remember a wargame in more than 4 decades that makes me feel so in control of one point in a chain of command so well.
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