$20.00
Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

Triumph & Tragedy» Forums » General

Subject: Bunch of newbie questions rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Eric C
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Got my new copy and had a blast playing it. A few early rules/strategy questions:

Mechanics

1. When you start a battle you have to reveal your units by flipping them up. What's the normal way to do this, mechanically? We flipped them directly "backwards" so that the bottoms of each of the blocks pointed towards the player who owned them. However, it felt a little confusing, visually, to see the CV value of each unit when they were all flipped in different ways. I noticed that the Playbook had the units all flipped so that they were pointing towards the bottom of the board (ie. towards the Axis player). Is that normally how things are done? Or was that just a visual trick for the playbook?

2. Similarly, how should the "neutral" forts be positioned? It doesn't make much sense for them to be returned to a standing position after a battle is finished, because I don't see who they should be pointed towards. Are they supposed to be left lying down in a "revealed" position so that all players can see their CV value?

3. Are you allowed to see which blocks your opponent upgrades during the production phase? Similarly, could you try to "scramble" your own blocks in a territory to try and confuse your opponents about which block was which? It seems like this can provide a lot of information - for example, if the USSR observes that the West isn't upgrading his India blocks, he'll know that he can attack even if he doesn't really know which blocks are present in that region.

Rules

4. I expected the partition rules to be a bigger deal. However, in our game, the neutral capitals were typically captured in the turn when the violator declared war. For example, my Soviet units were positioned to take a bite out of Poland, but the Axis player conquered Warsaw on the turn that he violated Poland's neutrality, leaving me locked out of the country. Is that normally how things work? Would partitions typically only happen if the violator doesn't bring enough units to the fight or can't get to the capital in time?

5. I want to make sure I understand the BattleGroup rules correctly - if a fleet, a sub and an AF all start in different territories and converge to attack the same sea space, then each of them would arrive separately in different rounds, right? Doesn't this severely limit the usefulness of AFs in sea combat, since they will typically fly in from a separate land space and therefore be late to the fight?

6. Could I confirm that you don't receive a country as a satellite IMMEDIATELY after three influence has been added? You always have to wait until the end of the government phase to resolve a country's status, even if you played one of those special cards that adds an influence and bring your total up to three in the middle of the government phase?

Strategy

7. In our game, the USSR violated Persia's neutrality fairly early and conquered it. The West really couldn't do anything about it. Later, the West and the USSR went to war, and the Russian infantry/tanks steamrolled over the Middle East and established a permanent Mediterranean blockade. The West player felt that he couldn't do much - his few starting units in India weren't enough to fight the Russian forces, and in any event he didn't want to risk losing the only units he had to defend India. Is Persia just a lost cause for the West? Is the MidEast a lost cause if the West and the Soviets go to war? How do you defend those far-flung areas?
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Szarka
Canada
Waterloo
Ontario
flag msg tools
When it is your turn to send a VASSAL move, the wait is excruciating. When it's my turn, well, I've been busy.
mbmbmbmbmb
1. Yes you normally flip by tipping forward away from the controlling player. Blocks in battle will have their current strength opposing each other.

2. The only reason to tip the neutrals back up is because they don't have an"owning" player to otherwise establish the correct direction. In practice they don't tend to stick around long anyway.

3. Watching which blocks your opponent keeps upgrading is part of the game.

4. Partitions don't happen that often for the reasons you state.

5. The AF could shoot in the first round instead of the surface units if you choose.

6. Correct, control doesn't change until the end of the phase, although the yellow cards do allow you to place influence immediately.

7. One hopes that the Axis keeps the Soviet nervous enough so he doesn't go all-out against the West. Otherwise you are indeed at a disadvantage in the Middle East. West incursion into Scandinavia can be a counterpoint however.

Hope you are having fun with this awesome game.
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
juerg haeberli
msg tools
To 7)

Who won your game ?
My first guess would be the Axis.

If the Soviets want Persia they usually get it and they need it if they want to stay in the game.

Please note:
You can build forts abroad.
This means the West has its 4 starting units in India and forts if he wants.

If the Soviets can establish a land locked Med. blockade they either had to much spare time to fool around or there was no fort in Suez.

Keep going its a great game.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric C
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
haeberich wrote:
To 7)

Who won your game ?
My first guess would be the Axis.


Actually, interestingly, it was the West...

The Axis overcommitted to a war in the East, ultimately giving the West enough time to rebuild and conquer the Ruhr Valley, thoroughly delighting the French units in his army.

I declared war on the West and stomped over the MidEast, but the additional resources from the Ruhr and some of his other allies still gave the West a strong enough position to keep pushing. The Axis was BADLY resource-blocked and was basically out of the game, even though they were able to make a strong stand in Berlin. We had to stop early, but the West was clearly in a dominant position and the other two players conceded.

I imagine this particular dynamic is the kind of thing that can only happen with new players who don't really know what they're doing yet. But it feels like you REALLY want to be a peaceful party and let the other two nations duke it out, if possible.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wayne L
United States
Virginia
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
haeberich wrote:
To 7)
Please note:
You can build forts abroad.
This means the West has its 4 starting units in India and forts if he wants.


Just so I have this correct, You can build a fort in any territory that you own. So if Spain is a satellite, I could build 1 fort in all 3 territories if I desired to do that? Obviously you are limited in Forts so you have to consider what should be a fort vs not.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Hansen
United States
Sun Valley
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
striped_zebra wrote:
haeberich wrote:
To 7)
Please note:
You can build forts abroad.
This means the West has its 4 starting units in India and forts if he wants.


Just so I have this correct, You can build a fort in any territory that you own. So if Spain is a satellite, I could build 1 fort in all 3 territories if I desired to do that? Obviously you are limited in Forts so you have to consider what should be a fort vs not.
Well, 8.2 Satellites is clear about this: 'Satellite Territory is now Friendly for that Faction (e.g., it can build fortresses and/or move there).'
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
And you can build them in *any* friendly land or straights area as long as it's not embattled. They are not affected by lack of supply. See 3.2.4.1.

Dieter

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.