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Way of the Fighter» Forums » General

Subject: What's the point of the block action? rss

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Jeff Paul
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You still have to win the priority roll, so why not just play an attck card.

If you win the priority, you hit and take NO damage.

If you block and win, you reduce damage by the dice you invested. So, you might still take damage and the dice are still spent.

Am I missing something?
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Ed Hughes
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It looks like a safe play if you have no viable attack to play. It also looks like a good way to get the opponent to waste dice. Granted, you aren't going to beat someone who has 4 dice and you only have 1, but if you both have 4, playing a block is a good way to wind up in a stronger position the next turn. The counter is of course a throw. If you suspect your opponent will block, a 1 die throw is a great play. That's where the guesswork comes in.
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Jeff Paul
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How does the block put you in a stronger position for the next turn? I guess I'm just confused by the wording.

Let's look at some examples

Option 1.
Your priority is less than your opponent's . Which means your block is discarded and you take the full damage of the hit. This would be the exact same result if you had played any attack card and lost the priority.

Option 2.
Your priority is higher than your opponent's. Block works (assuming it's in the right zone, etc). Had this been an attack, your opponent would discard all their dice to the burnout zone and you'd hit for damage, discarding your dice. So, you'd take no damage (and thus your opponent would get some dice in the energized pool).

But as a block, your opponent still hits. For each damage done, you put one die in the burnout pool. If you have any dice left at the end, you put these dice in the energize pool. All opponent's dice go to the burnout pool (barring combos, etc)

----

I guess my mental model is confusing me. I had assumed a block was a low energy pause. Rules as written, it's not. It's a high energy move that (hopefully) prevents damage and keeps some dice in your energy pool.

As well, it is actually worse at stopping damage than doing an attack.
 
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Ed Hughes
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I refer to a situation such as one where you both have four or more dice. You both commit four dice to the round, and you edge out your opponent. You reclaim all (or almost all- few attacks seem to do four damage) the dice used for the block, they lose all the dice committed to the attack. The next round you will enjoy a substantial advantage in dice available.

I agree that blocking seems like a weak option, as situations like the one I describe are probably rare. The fact that blocks are defeated by high-low mixups and throws makes this kind of play unreliable, but it also seems like it has a strong payoff if it works.

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Gandhi The
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Yep, @themanfromsaturn, that's it as far as I understand as well.

You reclaim your dice while your opponent looses his dice. So now you have the dice advantage and can start a counter attack.

It's a very strong strategical and mindgame to pull. Now if you just block with weak dice over and over you won't win the roll, but get dice due to getting damaged. This then also gives you the dice advantage. Theoretically, you can just block every turn, which will make the game a lot more passive, but this stays true to arcade fighting games. Imagine both players in street fighter are just blocking and not attacking, going to make for a pretty boring game until someone breaks the block and starts a combo.
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Ed Hughes
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This is the Battlecon/yomi player in me talking, but another reason to use blocks is to 'train' your opponent to use low priority throws and attacks, and commit fewer dice to their strikes. Once you've got them anticipating the block, you can safely start combos of your own.

It also seems like a good way to react to an incoming projectile.

Granted, I haven't played way of the fighter yet, and I'm just going on observations. Most of the blocks I saw in the demo seemed to have high inherent priority, but a lot of strikes do too. Hat to predict how it will all fit together.
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Raising Spirit
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If i undestand properly you lose one dice per atack blocked so you will have 3 dice remaining before the block.
 
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