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Kingdom Death: Monster» Forums » General

Subject: Assembly Tips? Plastic Glue, Pinning, and Super Glue. rss

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Michael Maslowski
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New Jersey
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Hello all,

I'm new to miniatures and have been reading up a ton with the upcoming 1.5 Kickstarter.

Unfortunately... I'm somewhat at a loss as to what glue/method to use when assembling the figures.

- Most 40k folks recommend pinning models when possible. I'm totally cool with the time investment. But that leads me to...
- Most folks recommend using "plastic glue" which melts/bonds the plastic and holds a better bond than "super glue".
- But... plastic glue doesn't bond to metal. Which leaves me completely confused. If I put in pins, the plastic glue will not adhere to the metal paperclip.

The way I see it, I have 3 options.

- Plastic Glue: Strong Bond.
- Pin + Super Glue: Strong Bond.
- Super Glue: Weak Bond.

Again, with plastic glue melting things, it kind of scares me. Would I be better served using super glue + pins, plastic glue + pins, or what? Everyone seems pro plastic glue > super glue... but is that if they don't pin? I'm just a bit lost. Your guidance is greatly appreciated! Thanks!
 
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Jeff M
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I'm new to the whole "miniature model" assembling thing myself, but don't think pinning is really necessary for plastic models on this scale.
I was planning on using good old plastic model glue like I used on all those old airplane models I assembled as a kid.
 
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Emmit Svenson
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Everything you will get through the Kickstarter will be hard plastic, unless Poots adds some resin stretch goals later, and iirc after the last campaign he said that the resin production process doesn't lend itself well to scaling the way Kickstarter rewards need to.

Plastic cement welds hard plastic together quite well. You probably won't need to pin anything. I didn't need to on any of the 1st KS's minis.

Don't be scared of plastic cement. You can get a little practice with it snipping your sprues apart and welding them together before starting on your minis. Just dry fit your pieces together to make sure you know how you're going to make the join before you add the cement, wait a few seconds for the plastic to soften, and you're golden.
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J B
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what's everyone's thoughts on the testors model glue that comes in the orange toothpaste bottle?
 
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Mike Kraus
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I have assembled over a hundred minis, both metal and plastic, using superglue to great effect. The advantage is if you screw up, a bath in Purple Power solution releases the bong and you correct the mistake. I have very rarely had a superglued bond fail me, so take that for what it's worth.
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that Matt
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Lowden025 wrote:
I'm new to the whole "miniature model" assembling thing myself, but don't think pinning is really necessary for plastic models on this scale.

I was advised (by someone with a lot more experience with minis) to pin the antelope to its base. Wasn't hard and works perfectly.

I use super glue exclusively.
 
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Craig H
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madaxer wrote:
what's everyone's thoughts on the testors model glue that comes in the orange toothpaste bottle?


I used it a lot at one time but have since converted to the Tamiya liquid cement. I found after a while the tube glue would get stringy which would invariably fall across the model.

To use the liquid cement, the best way is to hold the pieces together and apply the glue along the seam with a brush. It runs into the seam and forms a very strong bond. Unpainted parts only of course. Just be careful where your hands are as it can also run under your thumb producing a fingerprint.

My complaint with super glue is sometimes it simply doesn't hold. I don't know if I am using too much or what but it can take a long time to bond at times.

As Matt said (above) I am going to pin the Antelope to the base but other than that, don't really see the need for pinning regardless of glue choice.
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John Middleton
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Tamiya Liquid Thin is the best cement made.


Bar none.


It's what almost all serious plastic model kit builders use.

Plus is can be used to fix small seams by brushing it on to a gap and sanding, if needed.



Superglue is terrible for all plastic models. Anyone that says otherwise hasn't used Tamiya Liquid cement.
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Ben Turner
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Plastic cements are amazing to use.

Unsure of the materials involved here, but for other projects, people have used various plastic / resin mix ups ("restic") which will not respond to plastic cement though.

So in many ways, super glue is the best answer when you are not 100% sure what the model is made from. Sounds like a few people here have had success with plastic cement though on this project, which will provide a better bond.
 
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that Matt
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See also this impressive rundown of tools and mini building for KDM specifically

For previous glue discussions, see also Glue question for the master miniature builders

Me, I prefer one glue to cover all needs: my plastics, my resins, my craft knife flesh wounds...
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Fen Yan
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CraigH wrote:


To use the liquid cement, the best way is to hold the pieces together and apply the glue along the seam with a brush. It runs into the seam and forms a very strong bond. Unpainted parts only of course. Just be careful where your hands are as it can also run under your thumb producing a fingerprint.



I just tried this type of glue a few nights ago, Plastruct is another brand. It uses capillary action to run into the seam. Really good to use and bonds a bit quicker than the thick superglue I use for my metal miniatures.
 
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C M
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CraigH wrote:

As Matt said (above) I am going to pin the Antelope to the base but other than that, don't really see the need for pinning regardless of glue choice.


If you use the plastic glue you don't even need to pin the antelope.


Really pinning is only necessary when the weight of the part being attached becomes an issue usually with metal minis. Most of the heavy parts on the kingdom death minis are keyed, which basically amounts to a built in pin.
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Jeff Connell
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There is no need to pin plastic models. It is generally only used for metal.
 
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Drake Coker
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Liquid plastic cement. It helps to pin the Antelope to the base, though it's not entirely necessary. The liquid cement is easy to use, forms a strong bond (on plastic, it's worthless on resin) and gives you plenty of time to reposition parts.

Super glue also works, but it isn't as strong on small parts and it is fussier (doesn't stick at all until it bonds hard and it gets weaker as you try to position the parts).
 
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Patrick Wilhelmi
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x2 for the Tamiya cement.

No pinning of the antelope required.

I just used a part of the sprue to hold the mini upright and let it dry overnight.
 
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sam newman

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pinning isnt really used for platic miniatures, typically "plastic glue" is more than enough to hold them together, i stuck my kdm minis with plastic glue and it works fine. You could try pinning KDM's larger minis to get a better join but i would recommend drilling into both parts and using a small plastic rod as opposed to a metal one so that the glue will still work.
 
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Robert Ell
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I've used tamiya's cement but really, really like the applicator of this one much better than the brush:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006N6ODS/ref=oh_aui_sear...

 
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Blue Prophet
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On a related prep note, what have you used to prime these plastic models?
 
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Gringe Commander
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For plastic minis I would always recommend a good plastic glue, since the parts are melted into a single model and are usually unbreakable after that. Take your time and hold them into place til the glue hardens, or get some rubberbands and other helping stuff to keep the parts in place. Even ductape works fine.

Super glue is a bit dangerous as it does not melt the parts together. Over time SG can and will become unstable. I had metal minis that simply feel apart 4 or 5 years later, which is a desaster, when they are painted (you never can fix them without a repaint or serious restoration work).
Most SGs show some "white fogging" when they start to harden (the cyanacrylate reacting with the mosture in the air), which can spread around the glued area and harden in a rough white stain (looks and feels like the area is covered in fine sand) which could be visible after painting and require some delicate fine smoothing work, often leaving new marks from the filing/polishing.

I never use SG prefering 2 component stuff for non-plastic minis, if possible with a small pin and plastic glue for the other minis.
And I never had one of those minis fall apart
 
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Gringe Commander
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coolguitar7 wrote:
On a related prep note, what have you used to prime these plastic models?


Airbrush and Vallejo primer
Using an Iwata HP-C plus I can apply a really thin primer coat first, let it dry and then spray again. The result is a very thin but hard coat that covers no small details. Another advantage of airbrush priming is that you can add really small amount of primer even into deeper parts of the minis.

Army Painter sells nice spray primers too.
While those are good primers and even can be ordered in a lot of different colors, I do not like spray cans. You cannot vary the amount of primer and a lot of the primer is wasted because of the wide spray area.

If you got a lot of minis, buy a doubleaction airbrush (don't buy $25 no-names and get frustratet with constant cleaning-pause because it no working right, f.e. the Iwata Neo is a good&cheap primer-pistol), and a simple compressor (most around 70-100 are already ok).
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Bibious P
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I prefer plastic glue for the minis, made assembly so much easier (for me at least.)
Only part pinned from the core game was the antelope to the base.
 
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drew reilly
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I am really glad this thread is coming up.
I have been die hard super glue/CA/Zap a Gap user for longer than I care to think about[insert jaded 40K Vet comment].....however....I noticed some bubbles in my primer coat (I'm fussy like that) so into the purple power my prologue minis went. They cleaned up nicely, but I haven't been able to get a good bond on Ezra's shard arm ever since, so I will be picking up some plastic cement in the near future. Lucky for me Zachary's shard hand stayed glued, as that tiny bit could easily have been lost in the murky stripping solution. That Revel cement with the long tip looks just right.
I am also thinking a plastic weld is the way to go for getting the mini's feet to bond to their bases, as on the females, there's almost no surface contact there.
What is to be done when Ezra makes a heroic run at a monster only to snap off her base?
 
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Jim Patching
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HeWhoSlaysNoobs wrote:

Again, with plastic glue melting things, it kind of scares me.


Don't worry about that, you won't end up with a puddle of melted plastic for a miniature.

Definitely go with plastic glue. Super glue will still do the job but it won't do it as well, it's very easy to end up sticking yourself to the miniature and if you get something wrong and attach a part incorrectly you've basically got to snap it off or use some sort of chemical to get rid of the glue, whereas plastic glue stays tacky longer and it's relatively easy to reposition things once they've started to stick.
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drew reilly
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I just finished up the unarmored survivors, and I am so glad that I dug out my Testors plastic cement with the brush applicator. There is no way I could have positioned the second (super teeny tiny) pieces of the arms without the work time that the plastic cement provided.
SO +1 for the plastic cement in a very thin layer.

Additional: A clean work space saved my model when one of said teeny tiny parts was dropped.
 
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Dean Love
United Kingdom
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panzer-attack wrote:
HeWhoSlaysNoobs wrote:

Again, with plastic glue melting things, it kind of scares me.


Don't worry about that, you won't end up with a puddle of melted plastic for a miniature.


Yeah, the way people say "melts" on here is somewhat over-stating it. It breaks down the very top layer of the joint on each end before letting them mix and re-constitute as one. But we're talking a thin, skin like layer, it's not melting huge chunks together.

If you splash a bit of it on the wrong part of the mini, you can just wipe it off and its fine, you're not going to end up with a big scar on the mini either.
 
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