$30.00
Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 Hide
13 Posts

Bios: Genesis» Forums » General

Subject: Is this game really that hard to grasp? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Bruce Gazdecki
United States
Lindsey
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
mbmbmbmbmb
Normally I can pick up the gist of a game and figure it out from the rules.

After 2 readings of this game, I still have no clue about anything and nothing makes any sense.

Am I just hard headed, or is this game a little more complicated and require more?

I like to think I'm an intelligent person (i have an engineering degree) but this one has me baffled.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gunther Schmidl
Austria
Linz
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
We JUST tried to figure it out with the game in front of us for like 90 minutes. I cannot make heads or tails of what to actually do, only the respective steps. All three of us have engineering degrees, too... shake
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Carey
United States
West Coast
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
B:G was the most daunting non-wargame for me to learn since High Frontier.

Having said that, it's an amazing game so the extra efforts were well worth it.

I recommend the GrayBoardGamer's excellent series of videos posted here on the Geek to get started...
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Erich Cranor
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Reading through is a lot to absorb. I'd say start pushing bits around right from the start, go through the motions. The basic flow is straightforward, comparable to Neanderthal. Once you have that flow in mind, you can start to dive into the particulars of how to make good choices. I confess I'm still in that latter process but I think it's going fine now--but I didn't get anywhere until I started 'playing' dumbly just to see how things move around.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Denison
United States
Ames
Iowa
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Bruiser419 wrote:
Normally I can pick up the gist of a game and figure it out from the rules.

After 2 readings of this game, I still have no clue about anything and nothing makes any sense.

Am I just hard headed, or is this game a little more complicated and require more?

I like to think I'm an intelligent person (i have an engineering degree) butt his one has me baffled.


Ill second what people said here. Reading the rule book I didn't understand anything of what to do by just reading. Watching the suggested video helped. Then just going through the book slowly moving the pieces as needed and just trying to work the mechanics. Still took me probably three games to figure out what I was doing and to get all the rules right. I would suggest to anyone who gets this game to play it solo at least three times before you put it in front of a group of people. That is unless you have a partner that likes struggling as much as you do lol.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sebastian Zarzycki
Poland
Poznan
Wielkopolskie
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
"it doesn't look like anything to me"
5 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Will H.
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
1. Follow "Section C" to set up the game.
2. Use the "Sequence of Play" on page 2 to start.
i) Deal w/ events
ii) Place bionts
iii) Autocatalytic roll (and create bacteria)
iv) Darwin roll
v) Purchases
3. Use the references in parenthesis to look up the details.
4. IGNORE any secondary references until you're comfortable with the basic rules.
5. Go back and start looking at the details and special abilities of the mutations.
6. Finally, add additional life forms like parasites, and macroorganisms.


YMMV, but for me, that was the easiest way to learn the game and get playing quickly.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rex Stites
United States
Lawrence
Kansas
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Eklund games are completely unique beasts. Typically, previous experience with games of a similar type make learning new rules easier for experienced boardgamers. But since there's really nothing to compare to most Eklund games (at least in terms of non-Eklund games), you're basically starting from scratch.

I haven't played Genesis yet, but from I experience with other Eklund games, just reading the rules likely won't give you a good sense of what needs to be done or how. My best suggestion for learning his games is to read through the rules once and then set up the game for a solo play (multi-handed solitaire, not any solitaire variant). Then run through the game to the end. Once you have done that, you'll likely have a better idea of what's going on. At that point, I'd advise reading through the rules again to see if you've missed anything.

Eklund games aren't something you'll be able to read the rules and then know how to play perfectly. Your first run through will likely require lots of rules look ups and double checking procedures. But typically, after a couple of plays, everything will click and makes sense and seem simple.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris in Kansai
Japan
Otsu
Shiga
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Don't use the playthrough in the rule book as it has some errors, although if you realise they're errors then I suppose you are getting somewhere.

The living rules playthrough has been revised though, so that might be a good way to get walked through the first few rounds with a sense of what you're trying to achieve.

It was mentioned in another thread that this game might be easier to learn if you stripped away the theme and just looked at the mechanics, so just for fun here's a rough stab at it:

The game is about building something with various coloured cubes. The more cubes, the more complexity, the more VPs at the end.

To get cubes initially, you need to put your player tokens on the square cards and roll dice. Initially you can only place one of your three player tokens. Which square cards are available to you will depend on the event cards, of which you usually draw one per turn.

Certain dice rolls will give you cubes you can use, others will take those cubes and your player tokens away and give you discs instead. The discs can be used to protect against bad dice rolls, allowing you to accumulate and keep hold of useful cubes.

Once you have several useful cubes in different colours, and on rolling a double, you can flip the square card your player token and useful cubes are on. It now becomes a foundation for building your VP-earning cube structure.

The different colour cubes and player tokens on your structure now give it certain properties, like protection against threats on the event cards, or bad dice rolls. The number of tokens and cubes you have on your foundation will determine how many dice you roll for that structure, once per turn. Ones will earn you discs (if you have a red cube (or cubes) on your foundation), fives and sixes will force you to take cubes and tokens off unless you are sufficiently protected with blue cubes.
Yellow cubes allow rerolls, and green cubes allow you to place more player tokens on the square cards to get more cubes/discs/foundations.

Discs now can also be used to buy cards with useful properties (protection and so forth) which add cubes (adding an extra die per cube to those you roll each turn for your foundation).

Once you've accumulated a certain number of cubes you can buy a specialised structure with them. You then have to accumulate more cubes to specialise even further which is how to earn the big VPs.
Along the way, you have to mitigate the threats against you from the event cards and dice rolls by balancing the different colours of cubes and cards you've bought and the properties they bring.

Player interaction comes from contesting the square cards for cubes and discs, getting your player tokens into other players' structures allowing you to share their victory points, or attaching your coloured player card with your token(s) to another player's foundation or structure. This allows you to take particular coloured cubes from them, which reduces how many dice they can roll and also transfers the protection that cube afforded them to your card, helping it to stay attached, which will allow you to put your token inside the structure when it specializes, thus getting a share of the VPs.

Simple, right?

4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Colin Taylor
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think for me the problem is not seeing a game appear yet. I've read the rules twice and watched the first two parts of the Gray Board Gamer video series. Even after that, I'm struggling to see why I would play it. I know Steve Carey says it's a great game, but it's keeping itself well hidden from me so far. I'd like to get to the point where it all unfolds, so I can get to enjoy it, but I'm not there yet. This is coming from someone who likes Pax Pamir and Porfiriana, but hasn't played any of the science/nature games before. If/when that epiphany occurs, I hope it'll be great. But I'm not sure what has to happen for that to occur. I only plan on playing it solo, so maybe that's part of the issue and that it's a much better multiplayer game.

Thanks,

Colin
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
DoM Lauzon
Canada
Saint-Lazare
Quebec
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just watch Grey Boardgames video in the video series (full playthrough) or any of the review videos.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris in Kansai
Japan
Otsu
Shiga
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This game reminds me of American Megafauna or Bios Megafauna in that solo it's very much an experiential game - you play it for the ride.

The order in which the events come out can make for wildly different games, and you just have to hang on and do your best to stay alive and, if possible, evolve.

Sometimes it's just brutal and you always get knocked back, other times everything is going swimmingly and then the final 4 cards turn the planet into an ice ball/inferno.

That uncertainty of outcome is what I like. As I understand it, the Pax games by their nature aren't playable solo so maybe it's best to treat them and this as very different beasts.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Colin Taylor
United States
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Chrysm wrote:
As I understand it, the Pax games by their nature aren't playable solo so maybe it's best to treat them and this as very different beasts.


Both Pax Porfiriana and Pamir have solo variants. Only Pax Renaissance is without a solo option at this point.

Colin
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.