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Subject: Not enough pollution on the Global Impact tract? rss

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Thomas Stevenson
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I played my first game today with 4 new players (including myself). It was very enjoyable but long because we totally missed that pollution for all board actions comes off the global impact tract.
So assuming every one gets two more workers and a hydro plant that's 12 of the initial 36 (6x6) pollution markers leaving 24 for power generation, chemistry, and buying structures. Exactly half of the structures cost a pollution. Assuming players try to avoid structures with pollution they'll still probably end up getting two or more structure each with pollution. Getting structures is the key to maximizing your actions by using energy rather workers and is a critical part of the game. So at least another 8 pollution from the remaining 24 will proabably be used to but structures leaving 16 or 4 power generations per player as every generation use a pollution whether it goes on your board or back into the supply. I don't see 4 generations being enough to get much of engine going or to be very satisfying but maybe I am missing something? Given the victory conditions of the solo game I have to wonder if the game is really meant to be played with most of the pollution being taken off the impact tract rather than out of the general supply?
 
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Jason Brown
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Not every generation produces pollution. You use the die with the highest numerical result to determine if you pollute or not. If you rolled a 6 on a blue or green die, you could roll 4 black and yellow dice and not pollute at all.

I've played this three times now and have had plenty of success engine building each time. I've seen a number of different strategies employed in each game and players have always had time to build.
 
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Luke Laurie
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First of all, I wouldn't assume that every player gets two more workers and a hydro die - I've never seen that occur, and it isn't equally beneficial for all strategies. Secondly, not every player will use the chemistry space in a game.

All pollution tokens need to come from the Global Impact Track, unless a card specifically states otherwise (Global Impact).


Yes, getting structures is a key to success - but having a large number of structures is not as important as getting the ones that are most useful and efficient for a given approach.

I demoed a game and taught four new players to play today. They played very well for first-timers.

If I recall correctly, chemistry was used once or twice in this game. Gaining a new worker from the board only happened once. (Civil Rights was the first Global Impact Card, and all four players chose to gain an extra worker.)
Total here: 3 pollution

Here were the number of buildings each player had, and the dice they acquired:

Player 1: One Blue die, 8 structures, 3 of them caused pollution. (4 pollution)

Player 2: 4 dice, one of them blue, 6 structures, 4 of them caused pollution (5 pollution)

Player 3: 1 Die, No blue dice, 8 structures, 2 caused pollution. (2 pollution)

Player 4: 3 dice including 1 blue, 7 structures, including 5 that caused pollution. (6 pollution)

So - that was 20 total pollution from structures, workers, dice. That leaves 16 for generation, which is about what you estimated. Was that enough time to build an adequate engine? Absolutely. Three or four cards can be a pretty strong engine in The Manhattan Project: Energy Empire. Players will typically generate between 4 and 6 times in a game, and will get somewhere in the area of 12-15 turns. In that time they can climb to the top of the UN track, get up to five dice, gain 5 achievements, build 6-10 structures, and possibly clean their environment - though they'd be very unlikely to succeed in ALL of these endeavors.

Give the game a few tries and let us know what you think about the game length.


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Sean Geraghty
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MAJBrown22 wrote:
Not every generation produces pollution. You use the die with the highest numerical result to determine if you pollute or not. If you rolled a 6 on a blue or green die, you could roll 4 black and yellow dice and not pollute at all.

I've played this three times now and have had plenty of success engine building each time. I've seen a number of different strategies employed in each game and players have always had time to build.


You might not pollute your environment, but
EVERY GENERATION REMOVES POLLUTION FROM THE TRACK.

That is all.
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Luke Laurie
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Take note that when you generate and do not pollute, you still must remove a token from the Global Impact track
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gonecase gonecase
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LL Games wrote:
Take note that when you generate and do not pollute, you still must remove a token from the Global Impact track


Yes. We played this wrongly the first time. Tried it again this week and the game went much faster.
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Thomas Stevenson
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LL Games wrote:

.....So - that was 20 total pollution from structures, workers, dice. That leaves 16 for generation, which is about what you estimated. Was that enough time to build an adequate engine? Absolutely. Three or four cards can be a pretty strong engine in The Manhattan Project: Energy Empire. Players will typically generate between 4 and 6 times in a game, and will get somewhere in the area of 12-15 turns. In that time they can climb to the top of the UN track, get up to five dice, gain 5 achievements, build 6-10 structures, and possibly clean their environment - though they'd be very unlikely to succeed in ALL of these endeavors.

Give the game a few tries and let us know what you think about the game length.


Very encouraging discussion, we did enjoy game and plan to play it again this Wednesday with the 'short' (CORRECT) game rules.
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Eric Jome
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tas1624 wrote:
So assuming every one gets two more workers and a hydro plant


This is not a valid strategic assumption. You get your workers in this game from generating, not hiring. Lightning bolts, not people.

Try using Oil dice more.
 
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Scott Cantor
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cosine wrote:
tas1624 wrote:
So assuming every one gets two more workers and a hydro plant


This is not a valid strategic assumption. You get your workers in this game from generating, not hiring. Lightning bolts, not people.

Try using Oil dice more.


I concur, but it does seem like the random distribution of buildings can lead to a quick grab for the perhaps one or two worker-unlocking buildings that come out, and extra workers is a big edge as in any WP game. I'm interested to see how that plays out with more games.
 
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Jason Preder
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I've played 3 4-player games and 1 5-player games now, and I have yet to see people power grab extra workers like this. The game is too tight and full of tough decisions based on your goals just to assume you are going to purchase extra workers. There are many viable options to victory.

This is quite an amazing game, and plays quite quickly, even with 5 players who know what they are doing. Can't wait to play again!
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