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Lock 'n Load: Forgotten Heroes – Vietnam» Forums » Reviews

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Kevin Nesbitt
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GENERAL OVERVIEW: Players take sides in the Vietnam war, and attempt to win one of several different scenarios. The game is played on several small high-gloss mapsheets that are formed into one large map, depending on the scenario selected.
Combat is squad-level, and in some cases will even represent a single soldier. In some cases a "Hero" is created, bestowing special abilities on the controlling team.
Combat seems to be a combination of ambush, and furious assaults depending on who spotted who first. Each player's movement, while public must be spotted via a roll of the dice. In this way the amount of information availible is controlled. Without a successful spotting, the other side may be able to open fire first; sometimes with devestating results (both physical and mental).
Controlling leaders is the key here. By keeping small "fireteams" players can activate entire groups, rather than 1 unit at a time. To be successful (at least in my early games), you need to concentrate on working your men as a team, and forget about defending everything.
THE HIGHS: Nice looking maps. Not the best artwork ever as the box claims, but nice for a wargame. Also, the unit pieces are well drawn and big enough to cram lots of information onto them.
Heroes are also a nice idea, and lend some replay value to the scenarios. There is an included CD which contains some demos, and apparantly an online version of the game (I have not tried it yet, so I cannot know what is on it for sure).
THE LOWS: The maps are small, and sometimes it feels like there isn't enough variety. More maps would have been nicer. The rules are not as easy as the marketing team might want you to believe. For example, I had a much easier time learning Ted Racier's Barbarossa to Berlin or Paths of Glory, then I did with this title. This game is a bit dice-heavy too, something which may have worked well 20 years ago, but is starting to get a bit old.
OVERALL IMPRESSION: While I am glad I purchased this product, I do feel as if it could be better. I would really like to see a quick scenario generator (much like Shell Shock! had). I wonder if the scenarios will start to become boring too soon. All in all, I would say you should purchase it if wargames are something you enjoy on a regular basis. For new wargamers though, I would not recommend this title, as it is not as easy as you might think based on the box comments.
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Mike NZ
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Information re Mark Walker's LocknLoad
There 3570 messages posted on Consim re this game and it will give you a much better idea of what the game is like and how it plays.

Consimworld: http://talk.consimworld.com/WebX?13@33.4cUoajI9a9H.289102@.e...
 
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B G
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In response to your question on how Lock n' Load compares to Memoir '44, I may be able to help.

First off, I own Memoir '44 and have played several times, but have only played the free demo version of Lock n' Load: Forgotten Heroes.

Memoir '44 is definatly a 'lighter' game than Lock n' Load. Lock n' Load has considerably more detail and is not as accessible to kids or new players. Having said that, Lock n' Load is the first game I have ever played that uses counters, and was easy enough for me to understand that I was playing fairly quickly after I had managed to print, mount and cut the free demo counters. Apart from the increase in detail and attempt to be more realistic, Lock n' Load allows players to develop a plan and execute it much easier than Memoir '44. In Memoir '44, I usually find that I have developed a plan, and hope that I get the cards to allow me to carry it through.

In the end, I like both games for what they are, but if you are deciding on one vs. the other it depends on your background and what you are looking for. If you are coming from the direction of Axis and Allies I think that Memoir '44 may be a better game, but If you are looking for a quick play ASL, then you may want to give Lock n' Load a try, as Memoir '44 may be too simple.
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Aaron Kulkis
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Archinerd wrote:
In response to your question on how Lock n' Load compares to Memoir '44, I may be able to help.

First off, I own Memoir '44 and have played several times, but have only played the free demo version of Lock n' Load: Forgotten Heroes.

Memoir '44 is definatly a 'lighter' game than Lock n' Load. Lock n' Load has considerably more detail and is not as accessible to kids or new players. Having said that, Lock n' Load is the first game I have ever played that uses counters, and was easy enough for me to understand that I was playing fairly quickly after I had managed to print, mount and cut the free demo counters. Apart from the increase in detail and attempt to be more realistic, Lock n' Load allows players to develop a plan and execute it much easier than Memoir '44. In Memoir '44, I usually find that I have developed a plan, and hope that I get the cards to allow me to carry it through.

In the end, I like both games for what they are, but if you are deciding on one vs. the other it depends on your background and what you are looking for. If you are coming from the direction of Axis and Allies I think that Memoir '44 may be a better game, but If you are looking for a quick play ASL, then you may want to give Lock n' Load a try, as Memoir '44 may be too simple.


Remember... Memoir '44, like all of Richard Borg's (not to be confused with Richard H. BERG) Command and Colors games are merely card games in military drag, and not to be confused with actual wargames such as this one. And Axis & Allies??? Warmed-over Risk.

As a rule, the more plastic (or metal) used in game pieces, the less likely it is to be a real game (as the $$$ went into producing plastic dies and molds instead of rules development).

Good wargames simulate something (even if it's hypothetical). Pseudo-wargames are obsessed with standard "game" assumptions -- boards with symmetrical shapes and terrain, and symmetrical armies/navies/military-complex -- although Blitzkrieg is a notable exception. Blue and Red have symmetrical armies. Stratego and Battleship are the ultimate pseudo-wargames -- although Stratego pretty much requires plastic pieces (more durable than plastic stands holding cardboard pieces), the "combat" system is ridiculous.
 
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