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Subject: Creating your own cards rss

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Brian Zollinhofer
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I've seen a few people create their own cards for their games (the main one I've seen is Battle Line).

I love redesigning things, but I don't know how to get them printed on cards that would actually last (like actual playing cards).

How do you go about creating cards?
 
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Henry Vogel
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I created a label template in Word that has eight cards on it, four across and two deep, in landscape format. The cards measure 2.5 inches wide by 3.5 inches high (total template ends up being 10 inches by 7 inches). Enter the text you want on the cards, print them, cut them (paper cutter highly recommended for this stage) then slip them into card protectors (used by players of Magic and other CCGs). Some people print on paper then use old CCG cards for backing. I prefer printing on something heavier, such as bristol board, meaning I don't need to CCG cards for backing.

Depending on how many cards you're printing, it can take an hour or two to cut and sleeve all the cards. However, once you're done the cards will last for a very long time.

All told, it's a pretty simple process. Feel free to contact me if you have questions.

Henry
 
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Ron K
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'80' maxlength='250'> </td> </tr> <tr> <td width="15%" align="right"><b>Avatar OverText</b></td> <td width="85%"> <input type="text" name="overtext[avatar]" value="Train Game anyone?
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You can also use pre-perforated business card stock. If the square corners bother you, you can get a card corner cutter at a hobby or arts & crafts store (like Michael's).

Either way (business card stock or card protectors), they will be a bit finicky to shuffle.
 
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J
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I use Avery labels + MS Word Avery labels template + Bicycle Bridge-sized playing cards.
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Simon Hunt
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I've had some pretty good results with an inkjet printer, glue stick, xacto-blade, and laminator...







 
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Sampo Sikiö
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Basically what Henry said above. This is how I do it:

1. Design the cards (each card 65x90mm, see below) with Illustrator (or any such DTP program). You can fit 9 cards on an A4 or Letter sheet if you line them side by side. I recommend drawing guide lines for cutting as well.

2. Print out the cards. I mostly print on ordinary 80 gram office paper, as I usually use old Magic: the Gathering cards for backing.

3. Cut the cards with a sharp X-acto blade (or surgical knife, or similar) and a straight steel ruler. The ruler is a must.

4. Insert the cards in clear card protectors, backed with old M:tG cards. This is probably the cheapest option, as the basic protectors cost next to nothing, and you probably already know someone who will sell you old M:tG cards by the pound. You could also use protectors with a non-transparent back.

You might end up with something like these:

 
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