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Subject: Juvenile literature that adults can also enjoy rss

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Rob
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Recently, my 10YO son has been plowing through whole series of books targeted at the pre-teen and teen market, and I was wondering if these would appeal to adults, as well. Some of them look pretty interesting. Also, I'd like to know if there are other juvenile-targeted books that you think both of us would enjoy.

Chris D'lacey
Icefire
Fire Within
Fire Star


Rick Riordan (this looks really cool)
The Lightning Thief
The Sea of Monsters
The Titan's Curse


Jeanne DuPrau
The City of Ember
People of Sparks
Prophet of Yonwood


I recently finished The Bartimaeus trilogy, and let him borrow it. I think he'll like it, even though it is a bit violent in parts.
Jonathan Stroud
The Amulet of Samarkand
The Golem's Eye
Ptolemy's Gate
 
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well when I was about 10 I read

Dune - Herbert
Out of the Silent Planet -- C.S Lewis
Farmer in the Sky -- Heinlein
Caves of Steel --- Asimov

Hey maybe he's a SciFi buff instead of a fantasy buff?

 
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Andy Leighton
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Well Coraline by Neil Gaiman goes down well at around 10-12. It is fairly strange and scary so may not be for all 10 year olds.

I've just finished Un Lun Dun by China Mieville which would work wonderfully for a 10 year old.

The Pratchett juveniles also work well for 10 year olds. Maurice & His Educated Rodents is a good one to start them off on especially if they know the story of The Pied Piper of Hameln.
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The first two series that made a HUGE impact on me are the Lloyd Alexander series:

The Chronicles of Prydain

and perhaps even more so:

The Westmark Trilogy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Alexander

Prydain is widely available, I haven't seen a Westmark book at a book store in ages so no clue on that series but these were huge for me.

Cheers,
David


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Joel K
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Among my favorite reading memories from that age were the Horatio Hornblower novels by C.S. Forester. I got my future nephew started on those this past Christmas.

Once you're both done you can watch the miniseries that aired on A&E.
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Adam Skinner
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I've read the Amulet of Samarkand & Golem's Eye. Those were fun.

One I would suggest that I'm in the midst of right now is "Summerland", about faeries and baseball. Definitely a good preteen book that adults can enjoy (I'm kind of vetting it for my daughter).

I enjoyed the Dragonlance Chronicles as a kid. Also the Mallorean and Belgariad. All those are fairly simple "epic high fantasy".

Ender's Game is also one that a kid would eat up and is a great book for adults (one of my favorites, along with A Song of Ice and Fire). The Bunnicula collection was also a fun one.
 
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Adam Skinner
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vandemonium wrote:
The first two series that made a HUGE impact on me are the Lloyd Alexander series:

The Chronicles of Prydain

and perhaps even more so:

The Westmark Trilogy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Alexander

Prydain is widely available, I haven't seen a Westmark book at a book store in ages so no clue on that series but these were huge for me.

Cheers,
David


As a teen, the books (and I read a lot of them) that had the most impact on me was the Illuminatus trilogy by Robert Anton Wilson & Robert Shea (Wilson died recently). Also Heinlein's "Stranger in a Strange Land". In my adult years, I'd have to say that "A Song of Ice and Fire" by George R.R. Martin has had the most impact.

I didn't realise it at the time, though. My cat had come down with some kind of disease (feline somethingitis) and was slowly dying, losing control of her nervous system. We took her into the vet and I was like "I want to kill her, give me the needle", but they wouldn't give it to me.

I felt like I should be the one to kill my cat.

I realised later that this thinking was directly out of the first book of this series, where Bran is talking to his dad about headsman and his dad is like "If you can't look into a man's eyes and hear his dying words before sentencing him to die, them maybe he doesn't deserve to die. Headsman make the whole affair too easy." (paraphrase).

Of course, if we're going to talk books and life application, everything else pales (in my adult years) to the Bible.
 
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Gregory Amstutz
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I would highly reccommend Eragon and Eldest by Christopher Paolini. Don't let the movie turn you off. The books are excellent.
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Marc Kob
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Garth Nix is a great one.

Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen are my personal favorites. They are about a female necromancer....whose good ... and has a bandolier of bells as weapons against the undead. What's not to love.zombie

He also has the Keys to Kingdom series which is aimed for a bit younger audience. It starts with Mister Monday, followed by Grim Tuesday, Drowned Wednesday, etc. Not as good as the Abhorsen trilogy, but still a fun light read with some significant themes.
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Mark Goadrich
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I also recommend Sabriel, Lirael and Abhorsen by Garth Nix.

Also, His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman, and his Sally Lockart series are great, as are his short stories of Clockwork and The Firework Maker's Daughter.

I just finished Storm Thief by Chris Wooding which was pretty good too.

As for the classics, I'd recommend The Dark is Rising series by Susan Cooper, and the Earthsea series from Ursula K. LeGuin.

-edit-

Didn't see Moon Knight's post before mine. I agree that the Monday, Tuesday, etc series isn't as good as the Abhorsen trilogy. I wasn't a fan of the first Bartaemus book, and couldn't get into the Children of the Lamp series either.
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Falafel Palmer
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There's a new book out called Skullduggery Pleasant by Derek Landy, which I LOVED. Also, if you haven't checked out these, i cannot reccomend them highly enough: Dealing with Dragons trilogy or maybe 4-ogy by Patricia C. Wrede and the Squire's Tale series by Gerald Morris. For context i loved The Bartimeus trilogy. 2 other new good ones are The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart and The Last Dragon by Silvana de Mari. But of the 3 new ones, Skullduggery is DEF. my favorite.
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Daniel Karp
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I also recommend His Dark Materials, although only the first (and possibly the second) volume. Unlike some trilogies which are really single novels split into 3 volumes, His Dark Materials is one complete novel, followed by another complete novel, followed by a steaming pile of um... another book.

Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events is also surprisingly good, with plenty in there for adults.

And at 10, he can probably handle Tolkien's The Hobbit.

Also consider The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster.
 
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Mark Casiglio
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ensor wrote:
... Also, His Dark Materials by Phillip Pullman, ...


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T. Rosen
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I couldn't think of anything on my own, not having a 10 year old of my own and having little to no recollection of my own 10 year old reading habits, but will second (i.e., steal) other suggestions:

1) Asimov - Caves of Steel
2) Tolkien - Hobbit
3) Phantom Tollbooth

Oh wait, I'll be original and contribute one of my own too

4) Roald Dahl - Boy & Going Solo
 
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Daniel Karp
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Interesting preview. It's been a while since I've read the book, but I have to say, while some things looked pretty good, others didn't look all that faithful to the book to me. Was that flying witch even in the book?

I really doubt the ability (or willingness) of the producers to bring this one to the screen in a way that remains faithful to the book.
 
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Mark Goadrich
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Oooh, I hadn't seen the trailer yet, I can't wait now!
 
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Mark Casiglio
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dakarp wrote:
... Was that flying witch even in the book? ...


Well um ... yeah ... Serafina Pekkala ...

I do agree though that films rarely translate novels as well as the imagination can, and I doubt the movie can be as dark as the book. And I hate that the feel they have to bring up Lord of the Rings in the trailer just to get attention ...

But accepting that I'm kind of excited about it.
 
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Mark Casiglio
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dakarp wrote:
I also recommend His Dark Materials, although only the first (and possibly the second) volume. Unlike some trilogies which are really single novels split into 3 volumes, His Dark Materials is one complete novel, followed by another complete novel, followed by a steaming pile of um... another book.


lol ... I actually agree. I felt the following two were quite a bit weaker.
 
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Of those you mentioned, the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series (Rick Riordan) is the one that teens and adults both enjoy at my library (I'm a children's librarian). It's very popular.

I also recommend:

The Hobbit, of course.

Anything by Shannon Hale, but especially The Goose Girl.

Hoot and Flush, by Carl Hiaasen.

I have some Garth Nix fans, as well. And there are Peter and the Starcatchers and Peter and the Shadow Thieves , by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson. Finally, I would recommend Airborn and Skybreaker, by Kenneth Oppel.

I will second the recommendations of Lloyd Alexander, Susan Cooper and Lemony Snickets.

Stuff that would be too old for him right now but you might check out:

Tamora Pierce is well liked by teens and adults.

The Maximum Ride series by James Patterson. Yes, that James Patterson. The third book just came out, and adults are clamoring for it.

Robert Parker (that Robert Parker) just came out with a young adult mystery, The Edenville Owls.
 
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Mike Adams
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andyl wrote:
The Pratchett juveniles also work well for 10 year olds. Maurice & His Educated Rodents is a good one to start them off on especially if they know the story of The Pied Piper of Hameln.


And the 3 Tiffany Aching books by Pratchett are very good as well (Wee Free Men, Hat Full of Sky, and Wintersmith). My 10 year old liked them, as did my wife and I.

Diana Wynne Jones' books are written for a juvenile audience but make a good read as well. My wife particularly enjoys them.
 
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Robin
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One of my all-time favorite novels, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, is considered a children's novel. It's absolutely beautiful.
 
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Gregory Amstutz
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I can't believe I forgot to mention The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. An excellent series. Oh, and kudoas to those who mentioned The Phantom Toolbooth, another childhood fav that still resonates.
 
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Andy Leighton
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Mike A wrote:
andyl wrote:
The Pratchett juveniles also work well for 10 year olds. Maurice & His Educated Rodents is a good one to start them off on especially if they know the story of The Pied Piper of Hameln.


And the 3 Tiffany Aching books by Pratchett are very good as well (Wee Free Men, Hat Full of Sky, and Wintersmith). My 10 year old liked them, as did my wife and I.

Diana Wynne Jones' books are written for a juvenile audience but make a good read as well. My wife particularly enjoys them.


Well the Tiffany Aching books are some of Pratchett's juveniles. But the Johnny books are really good as well. Johnny and the Bomb being the best of them.

As for Diane Wynne Jones's books I would agree. The Chrestomanci series is excellent. As is Hexwood (although the latter is darker than the former).

The Tripods series by John Christopher is another good set of books readable by adults and kids.

Other authors to keep an eye out for are Diane Duane (So You Want To Be A Wizard is her best known work) and Joan Aiken (The Wolves Of Willoughby Chase),
 
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Helenoftroy wrote:
One of my all-time favorite novels, Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, is considered a children's novel. It's absolutely beautiful.


Along with this book, A Wrinkle in Time (L'Engle) and Where the Red Fern Grows (Rawls) mostly deeply affected me as a ten year old, and I'm sure they would today. All three feature very supportive families, which is depressingly hard to come by in juvenile literature (and especially juvenile movies).

I also loved the Hornblower books (when I was a little older, 12-14) and it would be fun to check them out again.
 
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June King
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Gotta agree with the A Wrinkle in Time books and The Phantom Tollbooth.
 
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