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Subject: Story Board's hot take on Pandemic Iberia rss

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Angelus Morningstar
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Originally published here, do not reproduce without permission or attribution:
http://storyboardwebseries.tumblr.com/post/154186576182/pand...

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StoryBoardGames/
twitter: https://twitter.com/StoryBoardWebtv



Synopsis: You people of importance in Early Modern Spain and Portugual. There are terrible plagues afflicting the populations and you must deal with the dire threats of malaria, typhus, the yellow fever, and cholera.

In order to win, you must develop cures for each of these diseases, by coordinating your actions with your fellow players. Like Pandemic classic, you must work towards putting out spot-fires of diseases that spring up as well as conserve your cards for the longer game as you must spend a set to find a cure.

From turn to turn, you will have up to four actions to take, like Pandemic classic. However, there are variations on the theme. You no longer have the full freedom of movement afforded by flight, and you can only quickly skirt around the Iberian Peninsula through port-to-port travel. Attempting to penetrate the interior land can be arduous, but you fortunately can help lay down rail tracks to facilitate movement over land.

More challenges await you though. In the early modern period, diseases can be treated by never truly eradicated. Likewise, there are no quick methods of removing cubes of disease en masse. In early modern Spain, prevention is better than cure. One of your available actions is to purify water, placing these tokens in the spaces between cities. Should any of the adjoining city become infected you merely lose one of these tokens instead.

Pandemic Iberia also includes two variants out of the box. There is patient flow, where hospitals draw cubes (patients) towards them, which means the placement of hospitals can be both strategic but also cause for outbreaks. There is also historical illnesses, where each illness has unique effects that make them stronger and more challenging.

Commentary: Iberia is one of two Pandemic reimplementation, along with Reign of Cthulhu. I have to admit from the outset, while I had heard encouraging things about both of these games, it was definitely this variant that was the more interesting to me. This is largely because I can only sustain so much interest in Cthulhu.

What I didn’t expect was basically to hit the ground running with Pandemic in hard mode. You have to spend a lot more effort rethinking strategically, and often several moves ahead. You have to divide your time carefully in various quadrants of the map because once outbreaks begin, it can take a while to get there.

No longer can you simply react opportunistically and enjoy the flexibility of rapid movement around the board. Likewise, no longer can you ensure the elimination of a disease through an early cure, giving you peace of mind over a quarter of the map. There is no peace of mind here, only the constant boiling pressure of disease and Spanish heat.

Our first game of Iberia was merciless. We didn’t feel like we made any head way until we started learning the new logic of the game.

Pandemic: Iberia has clearly brought new wind to the established classic that is Pandemic. While I can see a few design elements being realised over from Pandemic Legacy, they are all implemented here in such a way to suture theme with mechanisms well.

Verdict: If you’re a fan of Pandemic but you’ve played it to death, this is the next step in your journey.
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John Rudolph
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My wife never took a strong liking to the original game, but has loved Iberia. Then addition of ports, railroads, and purified water gives the game a whole different flavor. We have played it about 8 times in the past week as a 2 player game and can't wait to get it back to the table. Not being able to cure and eradicate a disease adds a whole new dimension to the game and makes it harder to win, but you can win if you play it right and keep the outbreaks to a minimum. Swapping cards with the other player is pretty much needed.
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Jose Cunha
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There are two countries on that board, see that dashed line delimiting an orange area? It's a border and separates Spain and Portugal, two distinct countries.
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Chris Watts
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Putzmanrudy1 wrote:
My wife never took a strong liking to the original game, but has loved Iberia. Then addition of ports, railroads, and purified water gives the game a whole different flavor. We have played it about 8 times in the past week as a 2 player game and can't wait to get it back to the table. Not being able to cure and eradicate a disease adds a whole new dimension to the game and makes it harder to win, but you can win if you play it right and keep the outbreaks to a minimum. Swapping cards with the other player is pretty much needed.


My wife is the same. Original pandemic never appealed to her either. She's really into this one though.
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Angelus Morningstar
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grayfoxpt wrote:
There are two countries on that board, see that dashed line delimiting an orange area? It's a border and separates Spain and Portugal, two distinct countries.


Amended
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Tyler B
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grayfoxpt wrote:
There are two countries on that board, see that dashed line delimiting an orange area? It's a border and separates Spain and Portugal, two distinct countries.


Well... Gibraltar was also under English rule at the time. So there are THREE countries on the board.
 
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Byron S
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I don't remember what I ate last night
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but I can spout off obscure rules to all sorts of game like nobody's business!
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scottishduck wrote:
grayfoxpt wrote:
There are two countries on that board, see that dashed line delimiting an orange area? It's a border and separates Spain and Portugal, two distinct countries.


Well... Gibraltar was also under English rule at the time. So there are THREE countries on the board.

If you want to nitpick, Andorra is also a separate country (though perhaps not at the time)!
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Tyler B
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runtsta wrote:
scottishduck wrote:
grayfoxpt wrote:
There are two countries on that board, see that dashed line delimiting an orange area? It's a border and separates Spain and Portugal, two distinct countries.


Well... Gibraltar was also under English rule at the time. So there are THREE countries on the board.

If you want to nitpick, Andorra is also a separate country (though perhaps not at the time)!


Sure! Why not?! whistle
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