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Claustrophobia» Forums » General

Subject: A structured and competetive way to play through the scenarios rss

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Sebastian Mellqvist
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Hi everyone!

This is my first post on this forum, as I this christmas finally picked up my childhood hobby of board games again after giving my cousins 11 year old son my old overused HeroQuest for christmas present, and playing his new game Smash Up with him on christmas eve(it is so fun!).

Before going to bed on Christmas eve, I stayed up for quite a while, reading on boardgamegeek to find the best adventure/dungeoncrawl boardgames out there, and bought Claustrophobia (with expansions) and Silver Tower (still gluing the damn figures together) just a few days later.

Since then I've been playing Claustrophobia with my girlfriend about eight times. We enjoy it, and I understand it's a much better game than all other board games I played as a kid. But today, as a grown up I guess, the competition aspect feels more important then back then, and isn't quite as satisfying in Claustrophobia as I hoped cause of the randomness aspects (you know, board games with dice isn't as fair as chess, of coures). I know I know, the strategy is important, but now after a few plays, I feel both me and my gf are starting to build almost perfect strategies for the scenarios we play and make the best possible choices from the situations we're in, and after that our humans or demons mostly are victims of luck or misfortune, and a dull "Why do we play this game?"-feeling got hold of us both yesterday. One other reason for this, except from the randomness aspect, might be that we've jumped from scenario to scenario the last few plays, with no structured way to chose who'll play human or demon, and in that way we can't compare or wins and losses in a good way.

Today I'm gonna introduce this game to a friend, and want to continue exploring it, but I feel the need to spice it up a little. Make the advancing in scenarios more structured and exciting, and wonder if anyone else has tried my following idea, or what you think about it. The idea is to use the different scenarios as a race till the end.

Playthrough 1: My friend play's as human, and I'll play as demon.
Playthrough 2: My friend play's as demon, and I'll play as human.

The player who wins with humans will advance to the next scenario, the player who doesn't will need to play it as humans again, until winning. This way, it'll be more obvious who is the better player, and even more is on stake in the end of a game.

What do you guys think of this idea? Has anyone else here played it like this?
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Greece
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It's true. After several plays you do get that feeling and there's not much you can do about it. There 'is' strategy to it, but sometimes the luck factor (dice & tiles), can completely obliterate it. However, it's still fun!

The way you're thinking on playing it from now on seems fine. Thats kind of how I used to do it. We wouldn't go to the next scenario, unless both of us had a victory with both factions. Gives players a motive to replay each mission and a sense of progression, without having to do any bookkeeping like in other games.
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Was George Orwell an Optimist?
United States
Corvallis
Oregon
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For me, the competition element is fully satisfied by playing a pair of games, switching sides for the second one and comparing results.

I think it's great that you'll be playing with a new player. Sometimes adding another player brings fresh ideas. You may discover that what you and your girlfriend agree are perfect strategies have flaws that can be exploited. I've seen that process inject new life into old games time and time again.

Towards that end, I strongly recommend that you not explain your "perfect strategies" in advance. Group think inhibits exploration; letting the new player approach the game with an open mind provides the best environment for innovation.
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