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Subject: Twilight of the Gods: An I, Geek "Living" Review rss

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Makis
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We had an idea over at I, Geek that seemed to fit well with a game like Twilight of the Gods. We've decided to title this a "Living" Review as we plan on bringing you our ever-evolving impressions of the game as we continue to play it over the next few months. We've demo'd the game, interviewed the designer Chris Kluwe, and done our due diligence on getting to know the game as best we can over the last couple of months. Now we're going to bring you an evolution of reviews. Hopefully this idea makes sense.

To explain a bit further... This is our first review thread for Twilight of the Gods. Currently, of all the members of I, Geek, only Brian and Mark have played the game. As Sten and Lee play the game they will be added to these reviews. This review won't ever be edited other than to fix typos and add url's to other reviews of TOTG in sequential order. That way as we upload more reviews (probably once a month at the most) you can go back to other previous reviews to see if and how our opinions have changed.

This is a first attempt at something like this for those of us at I, Geek and we hope you enjoy the work and time we put into truly learning this game.

A special thanks to Chris Kluwe, Alan Emrich, and Victory Point Games for your time, especially in obliging us at BGG.Con 2016.

Now onto the "Living" review:

Brian

Bottom Left Dragon Head
Total game count: 3 Full Plays
Current Impression: Intrigued. Still awaiting that Ah Ha moment where everything clicks.

At BGG.Con 2016 I, Geek recently had the opportunity to sit down with the owner of Victory Point Games, Alan Emrich as well as designer Chris Kluwe of the newly Kickstarted project of theirs, Twilight of the Gods. If you’re interested in seeing what other upcoming games VPG has to offer you can see our interview with Alan below, where among other things he discusses TOTG near the end of the video.



Twilight of the Gods is a new “expandable” card game that is currently on Kickstarter and has already reached it’s funding goal. If you are familiar with FFG’s “Living” format, then you will have an understanding of what VPG means when they say “expandable.” No blind purchases, you know what cards you’re getting, and there will be more cards introduced periodically. Seeing that I am the player in the group that is most fond of these types of games, (Netrunner, Magic, Conquest, GoT) I was immediately interested.

After recording a video of Chris demoing his game, I stuck around and asked more questions. To our surprise, Chris was gracious enough to provide us with an early press copy of the game we could take and explore. After some thought, we at I, Geek thought it would be a cool idea to do a “Living” review of an expandable/living game and give our thoughts on the game as our understanding of it grows through each play session and see how our opinions evolve.

I’m currently 3 games in and I’ve only used/played against the 2 gods you see in all the video demos currently out. Mars and Hera. Every game was with a new and different opponent, so after a brief rules explanation to the new players, we chose a god and started. Turn order is pretty basic and most players with any kind of CCG/LCG experience will have the phases down within in a few turns. However, even being familiar with these types of games expect to be constantly looking up keyword abilities your first few sessions. There are a lot.

Since it was a new opponent every time, this really slowed down the games. Just be prepared for your first few games to drag a little. With so many different cards and keywords, this game has a steep learning curve. Luckily, the press copy rule book (not finalized) does a good job of having everything in the glossary for easy reference and they also appear on the back of the turn summary card.

For me, there were two things that made this game stand out from the others of its kind. The Trade phase and the Manifesting of cards.

Let’s start with the Trade phase. In TotG, the Trade phase is how you are going to get power to play the cards in your hand. Different from most games of this type, the most efficient way to get this power is to negotiate with your opponent. All cards are worth a certain amount of “power” for playing cards. You are free to wheel and deal with your opponent to get the cards that you need. Since we were playing our first games and just learning, my opponents and I were easily swayed into accepting almost any offer just to get our feet off the ground and see how the game worked. This mechanism actually brought up my first concern with the game. What if people just always refuse to trade the whole game? Does it break the game or ruin the experience? If an opponent does refuses to trade, there are other ways of getting the power you need through other options like “Seizing”, but the penalties for using the seize mechanism seem to hurt you more than than the card you seize is worth. I decided to reach out to Chris about this to make sure I was understanding everything correctly. Chris said that their have been some rule modifications since the press copy release that we had and he told me some new rules and clauses to add for the Trade phase of the game. They have added a new “Force Trade” mechanism that allows you to do a 1:1 trade for the top cards of both player draw decks so long as their levels are equal (I, II, or III accordingly). Your opponent cannot deny this trade. You do lose the info of what card you lost from your deck and what possible “Manifest” ability it may hold, but I think I’m really going to like this addition. I’m anxious to try a game using this as I think it’ll keep the game moving and on pace. Once you have a play in your hand you want to pull off, you don’t have to risk breaking it up to to make a deal to get the power you need.

Now for my part that interest me the most, Manifesting. Every card has 2 abilities, an effect when you play/cast it paying its cost (Creatures, Intrigues, Fortifications, or Schemes) and also a Heresy effect printed in a black box at the bottom of the card. This effect usually resembles the effect of the card if you had paid its cost and played it from your hand, but it’s usually slightly weaker. Card heresy effects are typically only available to be used if the card has been traded to the opponent in the trade phase. Once in the other player’s power area, you can play cards and effects that allow you to “Manifest” (turn face up) these cards, which activates their Heresy effect. For example, let’s say I have a card that when I cast it directly, it does 8 damage to the opponent’s life. It’s Heresy effect at the bottom of the card is Do 2 damage to an opponent. If I offer this card to my opponent early in the game to use as power, then I have the chance throughout the game to possibly Manifest it several times and end up doing more than the 8 damage it would have done directly. Of course, casting it outright for a straight 8 damage to surprise the opponent can have its benefits as well. These are the types of decisions you’re going to have to have to make in every game and think about when including a certain card in your deck. Timing of when you draw the card in the game will play a big part in what you decide to do with it. This is what I’m most excited about; to see how it plays out once my opponents and I are comfortable with the cards/game play.

Other initial thoughts:

Components: I’m not going to comment on components as far as quality, as it’s a press copy and not a final product. Most of the cards do not have their artwork on them yet, but the ones that do, I’m very satisfied with. If it’s any indication of what’s to come, then I have no worries the rest of the art will be satisfactory. The current layout of the cards is also well designed. Everything has it’s place and is easily readable. From the looks of the Kickstarter, it looks like there will be a playmate as well for layout of cards on the table. This should help the first few games, but after a few times through you won’t need it. The press copy did not have a player mat.

Decks Included & Deck Building: The game comes with 4 pre-built decks. Due to my inexperience with the game, I still am not able to determine why certain cards are included in some of these decks and the function they serve in the deck. Some appear to be almost dead draws or meant for giving yourself an easy decision to offer to your opponent for power in a trade. I’m hoping with more plays their purpose becomes apparent, especially since most of them are typically out of your god's faction and prevent you from getting your god’s conviction ability (a bonus effect when in play or in your discard stack). Even though the decks are touted as being balanced, I don’t think this is a game you can purchase for your group and break out occasionally and enjoy because the decks are “equal.” It’s going to take a little bit of investment by all players who want to participate.

Experience and card knowledge will always be an advantage. Even if you don’t plan on buying anything other than the base set, I think you will need a dedicated group of players to really enjoy this game. If you treat it like a cult of the new purchase and get your average 1.3 plays out of it before moving on to the next, this probably isn’t the game for you. Player base can make or break these type of games.

Deck building does exist in TOTG and right now it scares the living daylights out of me, but in a good way. I love tweaking and agonizing over a 1 card switch in some of my Netrunner decks and I assume this is going to be the same way. The restrictions on deck construction are easy enough, but actually knowing what cards to try to include due to the play effect vs the heresy effect... man my brain is beginning to hurt just thinking about it. It’s way too early in my life-cycle of the game to think about this.

I’m excited and anxiously awaiting my next game of Twilight of the Gods. Hopefully, it’ll be with someone that I’ve already taught the rules to so that I can really start diving into the game, and unlocking Hera and Mars are suppose to play. It may even be time to start digging through the other 2 included decks to see what they hold.


Mark
Bottom Right Dragon Head (with glasses)
Total game count: 1 Full Play
Current Impression: Kind of the game I was expecting it to be, but so different!

Brian is the current I, Geek expert regarding this game. He's done the most to "own" it, be it contact with Chris Kluwe or studying the instructions, that he has the edge on all the semantics of the game. I had my own games to "own" as we've been hard at work on reviews, so I was happy that Brian ran with this one. What follows is my initial reaction to my first game.

Initial thoughts going into the first game:
As Brian was teaching me the finer points of the game and as we began discussing aspects we initially found intriguing it, occurred to me that Twilight of the Gods seemed really similar in many ways to Magic: The Gathering. That was a concern I had going into the game. Alan Emrich jokingly called it their "Magic killer" and at first I thought it might fall into the realm of "Magic copy." I'm happy to report that my initial concerns were rather incorrect.

While being a M:tG player helps with understanding the ins and outs of the game, Chris Kluwe has done a wonderful job of capturing things that work well in other CCG's and LCG's and crafting his own machine. While paying homage to its forebears, TOTG is different enough from other deck-building games that I can safely say that while I don't necessarily agree that it's a "Magic killer," I do believe that if it catches fire it can absolutely cut into that market with ease.

My First Play:
At first I was simply trying to wrap my head around the differences between TOTG and other similar games I'd played. After about 10-15 minutes it made sense. The Trade function is really cool (especially with the Forced Trade being added) and coupled with the Manifestation of those traded cards, this could be a popular highlight of the game going forward. I don't want to get too crazy about that mechanism just yet, though I would be remiss if I didn't point out its potential.

I was playing the aggressive deck of Mars which as a pre-built deck comes sprinkled with the negotiation cards of Hera. As Brian mentioned above some of these cards felt odd in my aggression deck and one of the cards really tried its level best at beating me before Brian could... a point I will return to momentarily. As Mars I felt the cards in the deck, for the most part, were thematic. That being said, I never really felt compelled to use his Deity Power, a once a game ability that each god has. This is most likely due to me simply forgetting the ability exists, though in retrospect I felt the power was almost too weak. I'll hold judgement on that until I have more plays under my belt.

Let me touch briefly on the pre-built decks and what happened with a Hera card I played. One of the card types is in the game is called an Intrigue card. Intrigue has two costs; the initial cost and an upkeep cost. Only one of these cards was ever played in our initial game and I played it. The card I played, if memory serves, allowed me to do extra damage any time I played a Hera card out of my hand. Throughout the game I saw a good selection of Hera cards springing out of my draw deck so I played the card assuming I would be able to use its ability going forward. Then during ever Refresh Phase (the start of each of my turns) I had to pay an upkeep cost from my power cards which eventually really hurt me. It caused me to hold off on attacks in at least three different turns and in the end the card was a waste of time, effort, and power. I won't soon play an intrigue card again unless its really late game and I have a ton of power cards at my disposal. I'm interested to see how this aspect of the game goes going forward but I was really hamstrung by the upkeep.

One thing I thoroughly enjoyed throughout the game was the fact that neither Brian or I really had a clue who was leading. The players HP is the draw deck and therefore unless there's a considerable difference in the size of the decks or you're nearing the end of the game, there's really no way to know how you or your opponent is doing at any given moment. At first I didn't know if I was going to like this function but by the end of our first game I realized I liked not knowing. It allowed me to play the game without worrying about my current HP. It felt freeing for some reason.

I also found the use of Power cards and how they impacted the number of characters I could currently have on the battlefield rather intriguing. If I have two I Power cards then I can only have a total of two Level I characters. If Brian does something to reduce the number of my I Power cards then that also reduces the number of characters I can have in play. It works well and will be something I look at exploiting in future games.

One last thing:
I thoroughly enjoyed my first play of TOTG. My expectations were way off and what I found in its place was a really fun and interesting game. The learning curve is steep at first as you have to learn a whole new lexicon for this game. I liken it to the first few times you teach or play Race for the Galaxy. Death by iconography! In this case its a slew of new terms that are similar in part to other CCG's and LCG's but different enough that it isn't entirely intuitive. This game is full of potential and even if I never play another deck or attempt to build my own, I could still have a ton of fun playing the pre-built decks.

My write up may seem glowing, and that's not entirely wrong. However I do want to point out that there are some parts of the game I found a little taxing. The length of a first play is longer than expected and I can only assume that, while it may become a quicker play over time, the first half a dozen plays are going to be lengthy. The new lexicon is cumbersome and slows the game down as each player stops to double check a function or ability. Plus there are some luck based portions of the game I might grow to dislike in future plays. However, I don't want to really address any of this yet as I think more experience will give me a clearer understanding of each of these points.

Thanks for reading! We'll return soon with another "Living" Review of Twilight of the Gods.
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Thomas Van Maele
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I have a question about the force trade rule. So if we had an successful trade in the previous round and my oponant says no trade in this round I still can trade Force if we have the same level of cards on top of our live stack? Correct?

And is there still the option after your opponent seizes a card you can Force trade the next round but then give a lvl card of your choice out of your hand and take the corresponding lvl out of your opponent deck?
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Brian Griffin
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Force Trade
Tigra wrote:
I have a question about the force trade rule. So if we had an successful trade in the previous round and my oponant says no trade in this round I still can trade Force if we have the same level of cards on top of our live stack? Correct?

And is there still the option after your opponent seizes a card you can Force trade the next round but then give a lvl card of your choice out of your hand and take the corresponding lvl out of your opponent deck?


From my understanding from the email Chris sent me, you can do the top card swap (if they are the same lvl) during your trade phase instead of even offering a trade to your opponent. Of course, the disadvantage is that you lose information on what card sits in their aspect area and will not know it's heresy effect. You can also offer a trade and then decide to use this ability if they say "no trades"

This replaces the old "Force Trade" rule so the 2nd option is no longer available from what I gathered.

However, the Seize option still exists and in addition, a new clause was added- "If the other player Seized from you the turn before, your cost to Seize goes down by one card for each card that was taken from you. Apply this only to the first Seize you make in the turn. This cannot trigger on subsequent turns (i.e. the discount doesn't keep ping ponging back and forth until each player is only at one card cost to Seize)."

I like this as seizing appeared to have a big penalty for performing due to the amount of cards lost.

Hopefully Chris can chime in if I misunderstood his email.

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Thomas Van Maele
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Thanks for clearing it out (if you understood the mail well)

It's because in the rules it states the above trade Force rule but in the example of the rulebook the old rule, there for my confussion.

Also if you seize you get a discount for Every pair of unplayed aspect cards you opponent has. But then again in the example it says that you count your own unplayed aspects aswel. So if you have one and your opponent has two it doesn't count. But if you have one and your opponent three you get another discount.

This is in think to keep the recources at the same lvl. The rulebook needs some rework but after all I don't think it is the final form.

Super exited to play this on tabletopia!
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Chris Kluwe
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You're correct on the Force Trading rules, Brian, it can be used even after the opponent declines a trade or says "no trades", or you can just use it right out of the gate. Note that it still counts as a trade, however, so you can't do a Force Trade and then Seize immediately afterwards. Also, you're limited to one Force Trade - even if the next card up is the same for you and your opponent, you don't get to do a second Force Trade that turn.

Also, thanks for the write up! Eager to see your thoughts as you get more into the intricacies of the game.

(And if you want to let Mark know, we deliberately designed the premade decks to not be fully optimized, because we want players to see those situations where they think "wow, this card doesn't make sense in this deck, it should totally go in this other deck", and then they're introduced to the idea of deckbuilding )
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Makis
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ChrisToTG wrote:
And if you want to let Mark know, we deliberately designed the premade decks to not be fully optimized, because we want players to see those situations where they think "wow, this card doesn't make sense in this deck, it should totally go in this other deck", and then they're introduced to the idea of deckbuilding


Mission accomplished!
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Thomas Van Maele
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Another question. Is it allowed go keep track of your opponent life stack? By maybe writing down how many cards my opponent draws, discards, destroyes and trades? Because you can ask your opponent to count there life stack but if there are more then 10 cards left you take a penalty. So bye doing this you would know how many are left.
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Chris Kluwe
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Absolutely you can, and I fully expect this to happen in high level tournament play, along with people tracking which cards they've Traded.
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Thomas Van Maele
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I hope there will become a high level tournament play here in Europe. That's the only thing i'm a bit worried about.

I'm doing my best spreading the word about this game.
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Chris Kluwe
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Thanks, we appreciate that a ton!
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Thomas Van Maele
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I have another question sorry!

What if my opponent plays no aspect 3 cards in his deck, and I need some for my late game cards would it then be that i have to seize them all from my own deck?
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Makis
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Are you talking about a deck built with no level III cards? The only thing that kind of addresses this is this statement in the rules:

It must meet the Deity card’s specific Faction Requirement (a number of
cards from a specific Faction or Factions in that deck)


You bring up a good point as the faction requirement example given in the rulebook says that you only need a total of 10 Mars faction cards to make it a legal deck. I suppose that if I wanted to build an all level I and II deck I could so long as I meet the requirements of 50 cards. I haven't counted the card totals but that doesn't seem impossible.

In that case I would assume that you would be forced to seize from yourself.
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Thomas Van Maele
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Yes that's what i mean. Would maby be a good strategy to take out a heavy aspect lvl 3 deck. As your apponent has to already take out his own lvl 3 cards to be able to play them plus the cards he has to discards.

Don't know of i like that so mutch if it's a plausible strategy.
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David Vestal
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I've considered this (as I'm sure the developers have) and we'd have to test if it's a plausible strategy and how crippling it is. A few mitigating factors are:

1) Obviously without any Level 3 aspects yourself, you don't have some of the more powerful cards. I'm not sure, with 50 "life" to get through, if TotG lends itself to a weenie rush strategy without a couple "curve toppers" to finish the job. Additionally the creature limit by aspects in play means you can't just spam the board with low-level creatures without limits.
2) If players sieze an aspect from their own deck, the cost is reduced by two. This winds up equating the net cost compared to seizing from an opponent (i.e. normal seize is discard X, steal card from opponent, so you lose X, opp loses 1 life. Self-seize is discard X-2, take one from self, so you lose X-1, while opp loses 0)
3) Having a player self-seize means you have no control over the heresy effects that you might want to manifest. You both have no idea what they are, but also, aren't able to pick effects that might synergize with your deck strategy. Without tier 3 aspects, it's also more difficult to manifest a tier 3, which means your opponent is less punished or fearful of activating tier 3 aspects.
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Chris Kluwe
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If your opponent has no cards of the appropriate level, then yes, you end up having to Seize from your own deck (which is why you get the discount). In addition, we tested making a no T2/T3 deck, and while it's annoying for the other player (the one running a normal deck) at first, once you get out some T2s, the weenie rush deck stalls out big time. You just can't do enough damage fast enough to make up for a T2 or T3 creature hitting you late game (which is what we want - I want to disincentivize making those types of decks).

Also, as David said, with creature limit, you can't just flood the field, and if your opponent has one of the defensive fortifications (Leper Quarter, Nomad Camp, Hydra Nest), then you stall out even faster.

You *can* make a deck like that if you want, but I wouldn't expect to win many games with it
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Makis
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ChrisToTG wrote:
You *can* make a deck like that if you want, but I wouldn't expect to win many games with it


This is what I was thinking. It can be done, but who really wants to do that? Playing last night using the Aggressive deck I got the Manticore out and it was the sweetest feeling. Ended our game quick. Couldn't do that without III's in my deck.
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David Miller
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I'm a bit confused on siezing. I'm concerned that my cards I siezed from my own deck will get mixed with aspects I have from my opponent. I'm afraid at the end I won't remember who's is who's. Has anyone had problems returning the aspects at the end of the game? There's not a whole lot of aspects in play so maybe its not an issue.

Also will there be sleeves? Seems like with the randomizing of aspects after revealed and discard pile with gaining life that sleeves would be pretty helpful with keeping the cards nice. However the numbers on the back are extremely important so its either clear sleeves or specifically made sleeves.

Thanks
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David Vestal
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@warpi9 There has been some discussion about this in other posts and the Kickstarter page, and the summary is that custom sleeves would have made the game too expensive. The current solution is to use clear sleeves and put a small sticker on the front (non-aspect) side to indicate ownership. The devs have considered tournaments and other competitive play scenarios, and are aware of other options and solutions to consider.
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Chris Kluwe
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As David said, we explored the idea of including custom sleeves, but unfortunately that would have driven our price point to ludicrous levels (turns out custom sleeves are expensive). Our best solution so far, again as David mentioned, is to suggest using clear penny sleeves, and then mark the front with either a colored marker or a small colored sticker.

If demand for the game grows high enough, I will definitely push for us to explore making custom sleeves available, but unfortunately right now it just doesn't make fiscal sense :/

Addendum - In most games, you won't end up with your own cards in your resource area; the only times it happens is with Seizing from yourself (which is very rare if your opponent has constructed a proper deck), if your opponent Manifests an Intrigue and puts it into play and you have to Recharge from your deck, or certain Heresy events (of which I believe there are two that cause the card to come into play and need to be replaced).
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Federico Abella
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With regards to what David Miller (warpi9) said:

Is it intentional that you might lose track of what Aspects are yours and which are your opponent's? I get that you don't know which Aspect is exactly which to avoid Manifesting the same card over and over (though, to be honest, I'd say that'd make them more efficient, since you're already having to do some work to Manifest stuff).

But, if Aspects of your own and your opponent get shuffled in a given Resource Area, I feel that would make Manifesting a lot more dangerous than rewarding as player's Resource Areas grow. At that point, you're more likely shooting in the dark when choosing what Aspect to Manifest. This might end up benefiting your opponent, or hurting you, or giving you some random effect that's not what you wanted (or worse, needed), and end up giving the game a somewhat sour "random and swingy" taste.

Don't get me wrong, I love the idea of Manifesting stuff and setting traps for your opponent. And all my comments are done with the best of intentions. I just felt after reading the rulebook that Manifesting could quickly become random, and a lot less strategic than what it could possibly be. There's so much awesome potential in that mechanic, that after reading the rulebook ot me feeling was a bit wasted by losing track of cards

I hope I'm mistaken though, but maybe Chris or someone else that's played the game can shed a bit more light on those kinds of situations.

(Edit: Maybe this discussion is more suitable for Rules/Strategy? I was just following up on the previous comments, but if anyone feels it should be somewhere else, please move it)
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Makis
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As the person who started the thread, I'm perfectly happy with your post. Ask away!

Early on the manifesting will be less random. As the game progresses and more and more cards are added to the aspect pool things will become more and more randomized. After you manifest, all the cards are turned over at the start of your turn and shuffled so your opponent doesn't know which is which.

That being said, I never really had any more than 3-4 cards of each level. While it may be random you still have a solid 25% chance to at least guess.

Of course this doesn't take in to account the new trade rule that allows me to trade the top cards of both decks if they're the same level which means no one sees that card's manifest power until it's manifested.

To be honest, before I played the game this seemed like a questionable mechanism. After playing a few times I've really found the manifesting, even random cards, is really fun.
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Federico Abella
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What you're mentioning is exactly the idea I was left with after reading the rules. To be honest, I was really sold on the manifesting as soon as I saw it, and it sounded like a great mechanic.
I got to reading the rulebook to try the game out on Tabletopia before backing it, and seeing how cards entered the Aspect stack blindly and got shuffled had me a bit wary.
I was hoping that manifesting would be a bit more strategic, as you're planting traps and contingencies and surgical strikes to trigger at the right time when you need them. But even having 3 or 4 cards to randomly choose from, some yours, some your opponent's, and maybe more than one just blindly put there, I feel it undermines a bit the awesome strategic power that could come from knowing what to choose, and having to carefully decide when to use them.
I get the feeling that it might happen, somehow often, that late in the game manifesting gives place to swingy situations, where the game tilts on you choosing the right card randomly.

Would you say that happened to you?
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Makis
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Frisco
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I'd say that most of the cards in your aspect pile are going to be your opponents. I've only seized from myself once or twice at the most. I've currently only played the Mars deck thus far but I don't recall a whole bunch of manifests that would be considered a benefit if they were flipped on me. Most of them range from annoying to terribly unhelpful.

Regardless of what's in my opponent's aspect pile I'm trying almost every turn to play something that allows me to trigger one of his cards. Sometimes it's as simple as tapping a card (usually a level 1 aspect). Other times it can really be devastating (level two and three).

I think the manifestations become more debilitating late in game and that's part of the beauty of this game. There's a crescendo leading to the last few plays of the game. It's palpable and you see it coming. Randomly choosing a manifestation card near the end of the game can be swingy but so far all of the games we've played have been very close.

I'm not entirely sure what to liken it to. Essentially manifestations happen to both players throughout the game. It's not a one time deal. You prepare for them as best you can and hold your breathe when your aspect cards get turned. I guess it's like a much less devastating city-deck draw from Pandemic. You know its going to be bad, your just praying it doesn't trigger an outbreak. Same thing in TotG. You know it won't be helpful, but you hope it won't be too bad.
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Brian Griffin
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Little Elm
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Mark is correct. Seizing a card from your own deck is quite rare. It usually will only happen late game when the opponents deck is out of the aspect you're looking for or unless they just build some weird deck that contains no aspect of a certain level. You usually have a pretty good idea of what cards are in your opponents' aspect area. Also, in most of mine and Mark's game we ended with only about 3 to 4 of each aspect level at the most, which means you have a 1/3 or 1/4 chance of turning over the card you need. There are also more cards that manifest level 1 aspects than level 2 aspects so if you really want one of their level 1 cards manifested, it's not hard to play enough cheap spells to allow you get all of them turned over, if you're really looking for a particular effect.(Depending on the deck you play)Hera has no problem manifesting level 1s.
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Federico Abella
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Montevideo
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Thanks a lot. It's very helpful to have the impression of someone who has already played the game. I'll give it a couple of tries on Tabletopia and see what I make of it in action.
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