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Subject: Debugging tech... rss

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Jon G
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Goleta
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In our first game, most of the questions were about how to most efficiently debug tech. Let me know if we did this right...

Rockets: Fire a bare rocket, or with a minimal payload for downstream testing

Ion thrusters: Send a thruster + probe on a trajectory with an hourglass, choose a multiyear course, fire each year until all cards are cleared

Rendezvous: Have two things in orbit, dock and separate repeatedly until you're sure the failures are removed.

Re-entry: Shoot an empty capsule to Earth Orbit, let it re-enter. Ideally, combine with life support testing in orbit and landing practice on Earth.

Landing: Shoot a probe/capsule/Juno to suborbital space or EO, attempt voluntary landing on Earth. Question: does landing practice on Earth require a retrothruster, or can a bare probe do it?

Life Support: Shoot a capsule to EO, leave it there for three years, remove a card each turn

Surveying: Put a probe in lunar orbit, survey once per year for three years, remove a card each turn.

Generally: If you're just testing, can you rendezvous and land a Juno just as well a probe? It's $1 cheaper.

A couple other questions we had:
- If flying somewhere with ion thrusters, you draw a card each year, yes? And a failure means you don't remove an hourglass, but otherwise continue the journey?
- If you realize you miscalculated in suborbital space, and have landing, can you bring the stack back down and only lose the first stage? And/or can you reconfigure later-stage thrusters to get up to Earth Orbit and park it there?

Thanks for the help!

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Will H.
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Ion thrusters are only tested at the start of a maneuver. If it is a 2 year maneuver, you only test them once at the start--not each year. If you are using two ion thrusters for the maneuver, you test each one independently.

The Survey advancement only begins with one outcome card on it.
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Israel Waldrom
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Quote:
Ion thrusters: Send a thruster + probe on a trajectory with an hourglass, choose a multiyear course, fire each year until all cards are cleared

With all maneuvers, you only test/flip cards for the rockets once per maneuver per rocket used, no matter how many years it takes - i.e if you are flying to Mars Orbit from IPT, which takes 3 years, you still only flip/test once per rocket/ion fired.

Quote:
Landing: Shoot a probe/capsule/Juno to suborbital space or EO, attempt voluntary landing on Earth. Question: does landing practice on Earth require a retrothruster, or can a bare probe do it?

Any component can attempt the landing maneuver. Probes etc are assumed to have parachutes attached.

Quote:
Surveying: Put a probe in lunar orbit, survey once per year for three years, remove a card each turn.

Surveying only comes with 1 outcome card on it, so it only takes 1 attempt to fully test it.

Quote:
- If flying somewhere with ion thrusters, you draw a card each year, yes? And a failure means you don't remove an hourglass, but otherwise continue the journey?

As mentioned above, you only test once per maneuver per ion fired. If it fails, you don't get the thrust from that rocket, which is likely to mean that you don't have enough thrust to complete that maneuver. Remember, if there are automatic maneuvers in that location (such as Flyby's and IPT which have lost), a failed rocket will suffer that fate as it is still at that location at year end.

Quote:
If you realize you miscalculated in suborbital space, and have landing, can you bring the stack back down and only lose the first stage? And/or can you reconfigure later-stage thrusters to get up to Earth Orbit and park it there?

Yup.
 
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Michel Kangro
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For some rocket tests, it might be worth it to strap not so expensive equipment on top before testing it and leaving that in orbit for later use/other tests.
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Josh Zscheile
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The rest has already been adequately answered to.

dr.mrow wrote:
Life Support: Shoot a capsule to EO, leave it there for three years, remove a card each turn


You can also send three capsules and test it to reliability in one year.

dr.mrow wrote:
Surveying: Put a probe in lunar orbit, survey once per year for three years, remove a card each turn.


Earth Orbit suffices. You can survey Solar Radiation from here.

dr.mrow wrote:
Generally: If you're just testing, can you rendezvous and land a Juno just as well a probe? It's $1 cheaper.


Not exactly sure what you mean by this. Any Space Craft can attempt landing and rendezvous, so yes?

dr.mrow wrote:
- If you realize you miscalculated in suborbital space, and have landing, can you bring the stack back down and only lose the first stage? And/or can you reconfigure later-stage thrusters to get up to Earth Orbit and park it there?


You do not need landing to bring back stuff from Suborbital. Any component is assumed to have parachutes to land. The Landing Tech however represents the landing in an environment with insufficient atmosphere for parachutes (like Mars or the Moon). So you do not need landing to bring back the rest of your space craft to Earth, but you can choose to test it on the way (If I am not mistaken and there is a landing symbol in brackets in the maneuver from Suborbital to Earth).

Where did you get that every year testing of Ion Thrusters from?
 
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Jordan Booth
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You can't dock/undock in Suborbital Flight so if you need to reconfigure your spacecraft to make it to orbit you will have to land and try the launch again.
 
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