G.W.
United States
Sebastopol
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
New videos just posted for my solitaire War of 1812 naval operational game, A Glorious Chance: The Naval Struggle for Lake Ontario, 1813 (preorder at http://www.legionwargames.com/legion_AGC.html):

AGC Tabletop version prototype unboxing and intro:


AGC Tabletop demo session - Turn 1


I've posted other playthrough videos of the game at earlier stages in its development, but those always showed it in VASSAL (where I do all my early work since it's so easy to tweak components). But some fans clamored to see the game on a table, so I made a physical copy.
No lake battles happen yet in this first turn of the U.S. Solo Campaign, but in the Turn 1 video you get a good explanation and run-through of the basic procedures and mechanics.

In future videos, I'll focus more on the action and strategy, pausing to explain only when new rules or concepts come up.
If any of this whets your appetite to see and play the real game, then be sure to place your CPO for it to help it make the cut for publication (Only 65 more needed!)

Youtube channel for the game:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcQQUAQdqGVoVyUhLwt_54A

Game page on Consimworld Forum:
http://talk.consimworld.com/WebX/.1ddb5674/73
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Richard Boyes
United States
Bothell
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for the videos.

I've got the game on pre-order!

I'm hoping the final production components take into account the need for sharp, readable fonts and good contrast to make reading as easy as possible. From what I can see from this play-test version, the print didn't look real crisp and there is lots of very fine print on the map, cards and counters.

I'm watching the pre-order number countdown regularly and hope this game get published before I....

Good luck.
2 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
G.W.
United States
Sebastopol
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks Richard -- and yes, no question about it, a top priority in the components and artwork that Legion Wargames will publish will be crisp graphics and highly readable fonts, etc.

(Some well-recognized "big name" wargame artists have already contacted me asking for the opportunity to do the artwork for A Glorious Chance -- but it's Legion's call and they're the ones who decide who does what in the end.)

If you want to see how great their components and maps look, check out their published games like Dien Bien Phu: The Final Gamble, or the new release Redvers' Reverse.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Palmer
United States
South Carolina
flag msg tools
Glad to see Glorious Chance is inching closer! Have you tried to write some articles in any wargaming hobby magazines? That could well increase exposure for the game. I can't wait for it to come out!

Scott
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
G.W.
United States
Sebastopol
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'll look into it Scott, thanks.

If you read a particular one that you think is suitable, what type of article about AGC do you think would be most successful there, and what would you like to read about it that hasn't already been covered in my designer note posts, videos, etc.?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Palmer
United States
South Carolina
flag msg tools
I'll admit that I'm not too familiar with the wargame magazine market. A couple of weeks ago I subscribed to "Paper Wars", a very high quality magazine put out by compass games. Though it emphasizes Compass Games releases, there are plenty of articles about games from other publishers. Most are reviews so I don't know if they would publish an article about a yet unpublished game.
As far as you own posts, I can't add anything; indeed, I preordered because of what you have been posting. I just thought that an article in a magazine might get your game a little more exposure. I also have an ulterior motive, wanting it to get to 250 as soon as possible in order to get a copy!
What you are doing on YouTube and here is certainly excellent in attracting interest.

Scott
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott Palmer
United States
South Carolina
flag msg tools
Glad to see the preorder number counting down. I just looked and its at 49. Definitely making progress. By the way, are you a historian? I ask because A Glorious Chance seems so impressive in modeling this conflict. I'm sure looking forward to it.


 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
G.W.
United States
Sebastopol
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thank you, Scott!

No, I'm not a professional historian, but thank you for the compliment.

But I guess I've always been an amateur with a passion for history, particularly military history.

And I'm a professional journalist, so that probably colors my approach to game design -- I take the history seriously and really enjoy doing a deep-dive into a topic before I do any designing.

Wargames appeal to me as "paper time machines" that can immerse me in a historical moment. I started in the hobby in the so-called "first golden age" -- the early 1970s -- as an Avalon Hill gamer and Strategy & Tactics subscriber. S&T called its games "conflict simulations" and the magazine issues always had well-researched background articles about that issue's game. I simply devoured those.

Back then, game companies didn't "talk down" to their audience or worry as much about trying to make simple, abstracted, quick-playing, entry-level wargames to lure new players into the hobby.

For me, it was the very complexity and depth of wargames that made them so exciting to me. I recall the tingling sensation as I examined the box to the Stalingrad monster "Battle for the Factories" in a game store, circa 1983. Another world was in there! Those games had a mystique about them -- I liked that they seemed to challenge me to step up to their level and challenge myself to learn new things about a period and its weapons and tactics.

So "A Glorious Chance" is designed in the spirit of those days. I've certainly included a lot of modern innovations like card-assisted mechanics and chit pull, but I tried to keep the history front and center and make the ideal game to my own taste, not worrying that it was a niche topic or that its depth or the number of pages in its rulebook might put some gamers off.

I was also very lucky that one particular historian made the Naval War of 1812 on the Great Lakes his life's work. The late Robert Malcolmson put such amazing research and passion for his subject into "Lords of the Lake" that I felt I owed it to him to make a game that tried to honor and reflect his work. Just about everything I needed to design the game was in that one book and its appendices -- although of course I got hooked and kept reading as much other stuff as I could.

Honor and respect are another reason why I take the history part of wargame design seriously. I'm always very conscious that in our hobby, we're entertaining ourselves by simulating moments where real people bled and died. It doesn't mean wargaming is wrong or shouldn't be fun; it just means -- to me -- that if I'm going to do it, I should approach with respect, similar to the way a historian would: to experience the choices real people faced, experiment to see what might have gone differently, and better understand why things might have gone the way they did. Is that fun? It is for me, and I hope it is for you, too.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.