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Rex: Final Days of an Empire» Forums » General

Subject: Thinking of buying this game.Got some questions rss

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Nick JoJo
Greece
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Hey guys,I'm thinking of buying this game cause I don't have anything close to this one in terms of gameplay nor Twilight Imperium themed

Got some questions though

-How does it play with 3-5 players?I know it plays best with 6,but I think most of the times I'll be playing 4-5,maybe 3 sometimes

-Is it balanced?I'd like the opinion of people who played this game more than once or twice.

-Are the rules easy to learn and clean?Does it tend to the heavier side or to the medium side

-What's the actual average playtime? I've heard some people playing 2 hours,some other playing 5 hours

Thanks in advance

 
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Jason Bush
United States
West Decatur
Pennsylvania
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Even numbers are best, 5 players give uneven alliances. This is light to medium, the rules are easy enough (lots of phases), how each race breaks the rules is harder to remember and utilize. 90-120 minutes should be plenty, if this is taking 5 hours for anyone, they need to find another game.

It will take several plays to become "balanced" for you. It's resource poor, very specific racial abilities and play styles, and the alliance system is not a common mechanism.
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Haz Dhim
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I do think the game is balanced. Not every race may be as easy to play with from the start, but every race/alliance can win this game. Each race has it's own advantages, and every alliance will be strong in some regards, and weak in others. Rex is very tactical, so much comes down to making the right decision at the right time. I've seen races being wiped of the board, and win two rounds later.

For us it fills the evening, so about 3 to 4 hours. I find it hard to believe you can end it in 90 minutes on a regular basis. The gameplay thrives on negotiations, bidding, second-guessing each others moves, etc. In our group, we like to take our time with that. If someone is especially lucky/sneaky/clever, he/they might steal an early victory, but that doesn't often happen in our case.

Rulewise, the round overview takes some time, as do the racial abilities, but it doesn't have endless exceptions of exceptions. So rather medium-weight.

I've never played this with less than 6, so I can't comment on that. But I would never even consider playing this game with 3. With 4 or 5, perhaps, but I'd be more inclined to take out Mare Nostrum: Empires or Blood Rage.
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Quantum Jack
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ive played at 3 and 5. the game plays well, but it feels lacking. it really is supposed to be a 6 player game.

I had a lot of fun playing with 3 though (me and 2 roomates, was easy to get plays in).
 
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Brad Johnson
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Crystal Lake
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Gaedr wrote:
I do think the game is balanced. Not every race may be as easy to play with from the start, but every race/alliance can win this game. Each race has it's own advantages, and every alliance will be strong in some regards, and weak in others. Rex is very tactical, so much comes down to making the right decision at the right time. I've seen races being wiped of the board, and win two rounds later.

For us it fills the evening, so about 3 to 4 hours. I find it hard to believe you can end it in 90 minutes on a regular basis. The gameplay thrives on negotiations, bidding, second-guessing each others moves, etc. In our group, we like to take our time with that. If someone is especially lucky/sneaky/clever, he/they might steal an early victory, but that doesn't often happen in our case.

Rulewise, the round overview takes some time, as do the racial abilities, but it doesn't have endless exceptions of exceptions. So rather medium-weight.

I've never played this with less than 6, so I can't comment on that. But I would never even consider playing this game with 3. With 4 or 5, perhaps, but I'd be more inclined to take out Mare Nostrum: Empires or Blood Rage.


Perfect answer. I think I agree with every point in this post.
 
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Daniel Major
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I played the game with 4, 5 and 6. Yes it's best with 6, but it works fine with 4 and 5 also. It's very balanced with any number of players, but you should know the tricks and advantages of your race (approx. 3 games to take it to your own).Rules are clear, easy to teach, just everybody should learn their race advantages. In our games (about 10) it was almost every time near 3 hours (because it has limited turns). One of my favourite game.
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Ashish Nair
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Since your questions have been answered, allow me to give you a better idea of whether the game is right for your group. I've played 5-6 times, and we try and play every week now. Hope this helps.

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I think this game is fantastic at works perfectly well at 4 (I've rated it a 10 because everything it has promised is there; I've played 5 times, and it has gotten better with each play), but IMO this asks a lot of its players. Let me explain:

1. Really rewards repeat plays: Firstly, the asymmetric powers take time to learn and get comfortable with strategy. It's not readily apparent how best to play a given power imo, but general advice is easily gotten from Pug's Dune strategy guides here on bgg, and can be easily conveyed to other players so you guys can play better quickly (see 2.) and consequently enjoy the game more.

2. Shines with lots of table talk: By this I don't mean via the official alliances, but via the non-binding deals, negotiations/discussions, and bribes. This ties in with understanding of player power strengths and weaknesses, e.g. Jol-Nar is a prime example of this*. You can sit there quietly and just focus almost solely on playing the board like a strategy game, but because movement is limited and battles are risky mind games, trying to win solo is generally difficult without engaging in unofficial alliances/deals/negotiations/misinformation. A large part of the game is coaxing people into a false sense of security, to make errors in judgement on the board and errors in trusting you.#

3. Players should be competitive, good at bluffing/mind games, and be fine with/even like backstabbing: Competitive because this game really doesn't work if everyone isn't gunning for a win, ideally solo. And they need to be good at bluffing/mind games because battles are all mind games (How much are they going to commit? What cards do they have/will they use? Is this battle even important to them/me?) but also because there is no secret talking allowed, players need to be clever in how they talk to their allies or convey information.

Finally, backstabbing, as described in 2. is necessary ultimately because you'll have to adapt to win, which generally involves breaking alliances both official and unofficial. This is especially true if playing with betrayal cards (add when you're comfortable/play well) which add tension to official alliances (i.e. great alliance, but can/will they betray me at the end of the game?)


Simply put, this game works best when players are invested in the game (i.e. learning basic strategy and playing often), competitive, and get right into the table talk as described above. Much like The Resistance: Avalon actually, thinking about it. Hope that helped give a better idea of whether the game is right for your group.

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* Jol-Nar know (a)the strategy cards up for bidding, and (b)the top of the influence deck. Using information to manipulate and inform/misinform is the name of the game.

Due to (a), they are able to influence bidding to a good extent, encouraging high or low bids, and even manipulating bidding so that certain people are more likely to get/choose the cards you want them to have. Also, you also know what strategy cards people have, so you know their strengths and weaknesses in battle, which you can leverage for your own gain, during your own battles or to help your allies or whoever is willing to pay for the information. Due to (b), Jol-Nar know whether influence is going to come onto the board (and where), whether places are going to be bombed by a Sol-Offensive, and whether a Temporary Ceasefire is coming up (i.e. official alliances and bribes can be made). Similarly, you can leverage this information, or lie to make people make mistakes on the board that you can exploit.

But as you can see, none of this leveraging works without tabletalk! And this kind of thing applies generally to the other powers too, just their focus and manipulation of people is different. Not to mention ample tabletalk allows players to hide with strategic silences.

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# One four player game I (Jol-Nar) had I made an unofficial alliance with Sol, and we were good buddies - he didn't attack me, and I would give him info about influence spawns (he was constantly coming up against Letnev) and try and help him with strategy card bids. A relatively important battle came along when Sol battled Lazax, where I made deal with Lazax - influence for telling him what strategy cards Sol had. Lazax, trusting me, picked the strategy card to counter what I told him Sol had. I lied though, Lazax lost spectacularly, and Sol trusted me wholly then. Round 5, and it wasn't looking good - Sol was losing ground on strongholds, with Lazax gaining the lead. So I coaxed Lazax again into an unofficial alliance because this time the influence deck showed me that a Temporary Ceasefire card was coming up. Instead of strengthening his stronghold, he went for Sol to try and get the fourth stronghold we needed to win when we allied (I held 2 at the time). But in doing so, he left his stronghold ripe for picking, I moved in, betrayed him, and won the game solo. Lazax was a little naive in trusting me, I admit, but the point I'm trying to illustrate is tabletalk - negotiations, deals etc. - and backstabbing are integral to the game imo.

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Jonathan Davis
United States
Texas
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Great response! Got me excited to pick up the game again. Only played once! Had a fun 4-player match.
 
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