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Subject: My buying is getting out of hand. rss

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Pete
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The games aren't your problem. Spending money you don't have is. Cut that out.

Pete (hates to see perfectly innocent games being scapegoated)
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Under the paving stones, the beach
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Buy less games. Stop behaving like you can't help it. You can. It's your decision and your fault.
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Stephanie Prince
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I'm holding out for a Euro 'til the end of the ni-ight...
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Consider trading the ones you're not playing. You can have the novelty of "new" games for the price of shipping.
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No One
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plezercruz wrote:
The games aren't your problem. Spending money you don't have is. Cut that out.

Pete (hates to see perfectly innocent games being scapegoated)


I completely agree. You have a problem with self control, so fix that.

my suggestions to help you:
1) set a budget for yourself for buying new games.

2) any game you want to buy, put on a list. Do not purchase any game immediately. If after at least a month goes by of it being on that list that you think you'd still like to buy it, then apply your budget to purchasing it.

3) Find a vetting process for buying games after that time on the list has elapsed. For example, mine are: a) It does not do something a game I already have does. b) I'm confident that I'll want to play it repeatedly. c) I know people who will likely want to play it with me repeatedly. d) after researching the game thoroughly (reviews, rule book, etc) I see no glaring flaws in mechanics/flow/etc that will bug me. If any one of these standards aren't met, the game comes off the list for good.

4) avoid kickstarter at all costs. If the game is good enough, it will be widely available after fulfillment, when reviews and other such info will also be available. This fits snugly into my suggestion 2.

Good luck and good gaming to you.

~V
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S Squidpigge
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I had a similar issue with games found at the thrift stores. I found some really good games but figured for a couple dollars I could take risks on some that aren't so great.

I ran into spending too much money on garbage and filling my basement with crap.

It does take a lot of self control and now I make sure that if I buy a game I really, really want it. I have cut down a lot on acquisitions and have been trading and selling off a lot of the games that just sit there staring at me.

As mentioned previously trading off games is a great way to acquire different games at a lower cost. This is particular great if you can find local trades or local math trades.

Good luck with getting that spending under control.
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Greg
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Doctor, every time I poke myself in the eye with this stick, it hurts!
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David B
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As much as board games have evolved, they will never overtake the video game industry. Don't kid yourself.

Also, you need to realize the number of games on Kickstarter that are actually as good as they look is a very small number. Stay off Kickstarter. Many of those games are produced without the development teams employed by larger publishers, hence there are often glaring flaws in the game play. And for that matter, games, whether they are Kickstarter or not, rarely live up to the hype; there is more crap than quality coming out.

My suggestion, make a top 10 of the games you own and think about why these are your favorites. Consider yourself a fan of those games as opposed to games in general. Participate in forums on those games. You may find your focus shifts away from acquisition.
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Geoffrey Burrell
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Every game that I buy I usually play. But it is more difficult to play them all because my family only plays during holidays. My new group is willing to play different games because they like diversity. A favorite is of the group is Necromunda even though it is OOP. But I too buy games with no immediate plans to play them or at least wait until my group gets around to playing a new game.
 
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Justin R
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I think this is more of a cathartic post than an actual plea for help. The problem is spectacularly easily remedied: stop buying shit you can't afford.

I've got the consumption bug as well. I'm not jeopardizing myself financially, so it is not affecting my life so much. But the sad reality is that I own 20+ games I've never played, and I'm sure that number will go up before it goes down, because I enjoy the purchase and many times my wife just refuses to play. And that makes me sad.

But I look at it as an investment in being the coolest dad of all time. My twins will turn 5 in the moment that would have been Feb 29, and my second daughter is expected in June. In about 5 years I'll have a regular gaming group of 3 people, capable of playing anything, who live with me (and awaiting maturity of the fourth). And then I'll build a fort with a sign that says "no Moms allowed", which is where all the games will be played, so of course my wife will want in. And I'll be happy.
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Evan
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I've made a conscious focus to limit purchases and focus on the games I love. I've done this by participating in the 10x10 geek list challenge and the "not buying games in 2017" geek list. I feel so much more fulfilled. I've gotten my list of unplayed games down to about 5.

Play games before you buy. Last night I got a chance to play Clank!: A Deck-Building Adventure for the first time. This game was HIGH on my wish list. After playing it, I realized it was a good game and I had fun with it, but I am very glad I didn't buy it. I would have regretted that purchase like I have in the past with some games in my collection.
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Level 3 Tunt
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It's hard to tell if this is an actual cry for help (which has been addressed with some reasonable solutions) or an indirect way to comment on the fact that our hobby is as much about rampant consumerism as it is actually playing a game and enjoying the company of your playmates.

If it was meant to be the latter, then yeah...part of being a "board gamer" has become "buying all the games" for a good section of the population, especially when narrowed down to just active users of this site. There's no cure.
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Liam
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1. Make a budget.
2. Make it tight and transfer excess into a saving account (ideally one which requires income to be locked in until a stated date).
3. Don't transfer cash out of the saving account.

If you think there are bigger issues, I'd go ahead and have a chat with a doctor.

Honestly, this could be so much worse. You're doing fine, give yourself a break and come up with a plan to improve things.
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Chris Graves
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I was having similar issues. Can you take an inventory of the "extras" you spend your money on and make a few changes? I'll give you an example of what I mean: I was buying coffee 3-5 times a week at $3 each, going out for lunch during the week, buying comics every week, and had a bunch of miscellaneous subscriptions at $5-10 per month. I now bring my lunch and a thermos, cancelled several subscriptions, and cut my comic collecting by 75%. Now I can have some disposable funds for games. Do you have some items you could get rid of or clean up?
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Brian Franzman
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There are so many things you can do for more discipline in how you are buying games (as well as buying other non-necessities), but here's a start.

Create a budget with your wife and stick to it. Make sure it's not too draconian so you still have some money to spend on small, frivolous things (movie night, going out for brunch, going on dates, etc). Promise to each other that, when you do slide from the budget, that you won't hide that purchase.

Refer to your current game inventory often, and which games you have not played yet. Don't buy any new games until you have played all of those you already own. Better yet, keep track of plays, and limit yourself to only buying a new game once you have played your current games at least three times, or even five times.

Make a rule that for every game that you buy, you sell off one that you have currently. This will get easier once you play all of your games several times and can decide which ones you prefer.

In fact, sell some of the other stuff you aren't using and are not attached to, rather than sending it off into a garage or basement. Most of us have too much stuff, but don't make the effort to be rid of it. Never, ever rent a storage space.

Try trading games instead of buying -- look into math trades in particular.

Let your friends buy the games. They'll be looking for players anyway, so just play what they own!
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mortego
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@Wolfdude: are these the type of responses you expected?
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Tom Builder
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Responses have been a bit harsh. It is a very rich hobby with a lot to explore. I also agree that trading is a great idea. I only recently discovered you can do that and it has been great.
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J Holmes
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I created a basic excel spreadsheet, put monthly limit in 1 cell, track each purchase, and cell color-coded green for in budget, red for out of budget. With straight-forward formulas, it automates the colour coding process.

Makes it nice and easy to see at a glance how things are going.

Spoiler alert, December and my birthday month spiked.
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Dr. Octatrack
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I had a similar problem, especially in the early days of getting into the hobby.

In my case, the excessive buying of new games was a phase which eventually passed. I wanted to really explore the hobby. But I still had to put a limit on my spending. As others have said, set yourself a tight budget. Stick to it. Sometimes, when a game has been on your 'to-buy' list for long enough, you'll lose interest in it, wondering how you ever got so close to purchasing it in the first place.

Do you have a regular gaming group? If so, try out games you have an interest in. You may find that you don't like it. Or maybe you do like it but are happy to occasionally play a friend's copy.

If you don't have a 'gaming' group, and you generally play with family or a few friends, let the player-count of a game influence your purchase. Only 2 or 3 regular players? Cross A Game of Thrones: The Board Game (Second Edition) or Mascarade off your list (for example).

If you keep your games on a shelving unit, tell yourself that when it's full there will be a one-in, one-out policy.

I still get very tempted by new games, but I own around 75 (plus quite a lot of expansions) and when I look at my game shelf some of the older, less played games feel like new games to me. So I'm just as happy to pull one of those off the shelf as I am to buy something new.

I don't know. Everyone's different, but I hope you can find something of use in this mess!
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Chris Graves
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jellyfish1 wrote:
Responses have been a bit harsh. It is a very rich hobby with a lot to explore. I also agree that trading is a great idea. I only recently discovered you can do that and it has been great.


Just did my first trade. It is a GREAT option!

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DB
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jellyfish1 wrote:
Responses have been a bit harsh. It is a very rich hobby with a lot to explore. I also agree that trading is a great idea. I only recently discovered you can do that and it has been great.

I think people are responding to:

Wolf_Dude80 wrote:
even though I have felt the financial restraint this hobby causes I continue to indulge when I should be saving my money for more important things such as when my kid goes to school. Please help.

This is a very easy hobby for a person with a collecting-to-hoarding mindset to get in over their head with. New boardgames are just the right price to feel like you're buying something special without agonizing over individual purchases, they stack and store easily and look nice on a shelf, and the online culture places constant emphasis on the new hotness (just look to your left!).

Good luck, Wolf_Dude, I hope you can find some balance.
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Try this out...

for every $1 you spend on a new game, you have to receive $2 in return for a game that you currently own, by selling it.

It will work like a charm.

Mathematicians and those with general sense of maths, please don't get in the way of a perfectly good treatment regimen.
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Ryan Feathers
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There's tons of good advice already shared.

I'll just echo one thing that I've really found has made me desire less new games:

Pick a few of your favorite games. Get involved in those games. Subscribe to those threads. Get involved in the community online here for those games.

Instead of always wanting new games, you may find yourself desiring to just get more involved with your favorites.

Not that I had a purchasing issues before anyhow, but recently my desires to buy new games is very low. I've been very involved with A Feast for Odin over the past few months as it is one of my favorite games. I have posted several sessions reports, I've gotten it to the table often, even as a solo game, I've participated in the online strategy discussion and competitions. It's been great. (Although I suppose using a very new game as an example somewhat defeats the point of this...but at the same time A Feast for Odin was on my wishlist for months and I didn't get it until several reviews came out making it clear to me that I would really enjoy it)

Finally, make use of the wish list feature here on BGG and never ever ever get a game that hasn't been on there for at least x months. I'd say 3 honestly. You'll be surprised how many games fall off in time, and as others have said it will really kick that kickstarter habit.

Hope you can make use of all the excellent advice here.
 
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Dave Lartigue
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In addition to what others have said about budgeting and trading and such, also consider something that doesn't get mentioned often here: doing without. Pass on something you want -- even if you could fit it in the budget -- and discover that the world didn't end, your heart is still beating, and you still have plenty of games to play. Curtail the fear of missing out that drives these purchases, and eventually you won't even have to worry about breaking your budget because you're not lunging at every shiny thing that's dangled in front of you.
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Bryan Thunkd
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plezercruz wrote:
The games aren't your problem. Spending money you don't have is. Cut that out.
Actually I don't think that's the problem. I mean yes, spending money you don't have is certainly a problem. But many people who can afford to spend the money end up in a similar situation, regretting that they've bought games that never get played.

The real problem is that he's bought into a fantasy. The illusion is that buying games will make you more happy than it actually does. And part of the reason for that is that discovering a great game you love is amazing. There's nothing better than that. You end up playing the game a lot and enjoying the heck out of it. It's this ideal that he thinks he's going to recreate when he buys a new game.

So over time, that great game is no longer shiny and new. It's still good, but he wants that "falling in love" feeling again. He craves the rush he got from finding a great new and exciting game again. He thinks buying a new game will allow him to recreate that feeling. And it kind of works... he gets excited and filled with anticipation. And a new game is new and different which adds to his excitement. But not every game can be as great as the experience he's trying to recreate. And at some point, when you have shelf full of good games, getting one more good game isn't as exciting as it used to be.

That excitement and anticipation he feels when he's buying a game is based on a false belief that this game will make him as happy as his first great game did. And maybe sometimes it does. Every so often a great game comes out and becomes a classic. But the reality is that most likely it'll just be one more (probably) good game that sits on a shelf most of the time and gets into rotation once every blue moon. And there's nothing wrong with that... good games are good games... except that that's not what he told himself when he was buying it. It's time to start being realistic. Recognize that games you're thinking of buying will most likely be good, and that you'll enjoy them, but it probably won't be anything earth-shattering. Once you set your expectations appropriately, and you're not blinded by illusions, then you're able to make better purchase decisions.

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J Holmes
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Instructions unclear: For every $1 of new games I purchased, I then purchased another $2 worth of games.


darthhugo wrote:
Try this out...

for every $1 you spend on a new game, you have to receive $2 in return for a game that you currently own, by selling it.

It will work like a charm.

Mathematicians and those with general sense of maths, please don't get in the way of a perfectly good treatment regimen.
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