Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Recommendations

Subject: Myth vs D&D board games (ravenloft,Drizzt, etc.) rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
monte fraser
msg tools
with the new rules of myth, what has the best dungeon crawler experience? do either of them have loot drops or a level progression system? coming from zombicide BP but feel its a little light on theme. awesome mechanics great games but the zombies don't feel like zombies when you want it to be a dungeon crawler experience.thank you all for being such a great group of people to ask questions also sort of hoping to play the game solo as i play zombicide BP with only 1 survivor. thrud and milo dont need help. ahah.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Freelance Police
United States
Palo Alto
California
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
While I have the D&D Adventure System games, I don't particularly like them. If you've played the Gauntlet arcade game, the games feel relentless as you don't get a breather (and the monsters get to attack first, which doesn't feel heroic!). I can recommend the games if you want the components for D&D RPG adventures.

I also have Myth, but tracking down all the rules and content is a pain if you want to get stuff (if you're not a completionist, stick to Myth 2.0 and retail expansions). The game is quirky in that you set the difficulty level and do not keep any loot you find during a campaign, unless you play by their alternate module system. Ask on the Myth forum for a better explanation.

Descent is "one vs. many" but both FFG and fans have made coop and therefore solo versions. The FFG coops use only the base game, or the content from the first expansion. It also has an app that let you play coop; the app has been well-received, but not all of its content is free.

If you already have the miniatures and other components, give the D&D 4th edition a try. Much of the mechanics focus on combat as found in boardgames. http://dnd.chromesphere.com/How_to_play.html

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
justin hirst
United Kingdom
Halifax
West Yorkshire
flag msg tools
Hmmmmmm, Gauntlet.

"Elf stole the food" .... why u little ********, I've only got 100 health and a wall of Demons are coming.....

Happy days
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Franklin
United Kingdom
Braintree
Essex
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Myth

- The core of the game is tactical minis combat, coupled with some hand management. It's very much about co-ordinating with the other players and controlling the flow of turns. I don't know how much you've read, but there is no fixed turn order - the players can intersperse actions at will, and the monsters get a turn either when the players pause to refresh or when they've played a certain number of powerful actions. You don't have access to all your abilities at once - what you can do this turn is dependent on which of your cards you've drawn.

- There is a lot of fun in grabbing loot, and it's the main method of progressing within a play session, but you lose all of it at the end of the play session, unless you've progressed far enough to mitigate this.

- There are two distinct methods to play. One is free-from adventuring, where you set the difficulty level yourself, throw in some short quests from a card deck if you want, and generally play until you've had enough. You mostly won't keep the loot, but you can improve the quality of the treasure bag, which means you'll get better loot next time, but if you're used to something more like a traditional D&D game, it feels fairly abstract advancement.

- Story mode, or now modules, give you a defined set-up which you progress through, typically in three "Acts" or play sessions. These will give you character advancement in the form of cards (improving the abilities in your deck), and also titles (some kind of special power, and allow you to keep an item of loot).

- You can also get titles and cards in adventure mode by fighting bosses. This is quite hard to do without some decent loot and abilities, as they're tough, so a bit of a problem without at least *some* story mode play, or getting the treasure bag to a good state before trying a "boss run".

- For either mode, there's no real exploration - either you're choosing your own tiles, or they're dictated to you by the module. No surprises.

Overall, the combat is really good, but the pace of advancement outside of the modules is quite slow. If you're looking for a level progression system, you're going to want the modules, for which it's fairly early days. Also, the rules take some time to learn - you will want to spend a good few hours (and the forums, and probably some YouTube videos) solo with this before you take it anywhere near a group.


D&D Adventure System

- Much more exploration-based - you turn over a tile, see what you get, and then try to manage the outcome.

- More traditional turn structure - first player, second player, third player, monsters, back to the top.

- Plenty of loot, but some of it is quite bland, and it can be a bit random what you get.

- Character advancement is limited to one level gain.

- Both loot and advancement are per-adventure, everything resets between play sessions.

- Monster, and especially boss "programmed AI" has a good narrative feel. There's a lot of "fast movement" (by tile, or "move to the closest...") which takes away a lot of the grid-counting and adds drama, but it means you don't have the same level of tactical decision-making as Myth.

Overall, I think it's a great for a quick pick-up game, and has a lot of dungeon-crawl exploration flavour, and almost cinematic combat, but there's no progression or persistence.


Either plays OK solo, in the sense that you can control more than one hero by yourself. D&D claims to work for at least some of the missions with a single hero, but I think you'd struggle with many of them.
1 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gláucio Reis
Brazil
Rio de Janeiro
RJ
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tim-pelican wrote:

D&D Adventure System

- More traditional turn structure - first player, second player, third player, monsters, back to the top.

It's actually "first player, monsters, second player, monsters, third player, monsters" etc. But each player only activates the monsters he controls.

Quote:
(...) there's no progression or persistence.

Temple of Elemental Evil is totally campaign-based. You keep your items between scenarios and may buy skill tokens after you upgrade to second level. Monsters also get better.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim Franklin
United Kingdom
Braintree
Essex
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
GSReis wrote:
It's actually "first player, monsters, second player, monsters, third player, monsters" etc. But each player only activates the monsters he controls.


Thanks, good catch - it's been a little while.

Quote:
Temple of Elemental Evil is totally campaign-based. You keep your items between scenarios and may buy skill tokens after you upgrade to second level. Monsters also get better.


That's useful to know, I've only played the original three titles.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
monte fraser
msg tools
In that case with already having zombicide these games dont feel necessary.looking into some new KS games like Darklight:memento mori,Massive darkness, and Dungeon Crusade.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.