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Subject: How do you Prime a miniature with hard to reach nooks?? rss

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Paul Liolio
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I had decided that Duplicolor Spray, Sandable White, was all I ever needed in this world.. But I had only painted teeny tiny simply board game figures..

Now I've got slightly larger 'assembled' minis, like those in Adrenaline and DOOM, and after spraying the Adrenaline minis, I can see how a black primer hitting all these hard to reach areas would be ideal... I've already sprayed on a light white, so I'm just going to go ahead on this one, but I definitely want to do it right for DOOM..... soo... How do you get primer into those mariana's trenches, those mouths and arm pits and hidden spots?

Do you just keep spraying and spraying until you hit everything?
I'd be worried about mucking that up and losing detail...

or

Do you instead slop on a thin brush on primer, like the Vallejo Acrylic Polyurethane black?

And supposing you did that, afterward, would you possibly do a white dry brushing, or simply do a top down spray of white, to bring out those colors you'll be painting on?




Thanks for your tips!

 
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alex bermudez
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Personally I'd just hit those areas with some paint that matches the primer color. Definitely don't keep spraying the primer.

Chances are that paint in hard-to-reach areas isn't going to chip away since those areas are obviously hard to reach, so you don't really need the extra help of primer. As long as you're not throwing your models around the room or playing hackey sack with them, the paint will probably stay on.
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Andrew Stewart
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Polioliolio wrote:
I had decided that Duplicolor Spray, Sandable White, was all I ever needed in this world..


Yes, this is indeed the BEST spray undercoat ever (speaking as a 40 odd year veteran painter).And thankfully also available down here....
But re. your question don't worry too much about stuff you can't reach or especially see. As has been said it won't be getting touched, and unless you're entering some fancy, schmancy painting comp for large scale figures, apply the 2-foot rule, i.e. if it looks good/OK from 2 foot away it's good for gaming

And really avoid black primer as much as you cancool
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Broti
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I have an airbrush set up and lots of cans of primer in several colours. What do I do? Lately I prime my miniatures with a brush. I use Vallejo PU Primer black for this. I somewhat slop it on with an old brush (it kills brushes). Working quick is more important than perfect layers (after all it's priming, not basecoating!). Don't worry about thickness and brushstrokes. This stuff is self-levelling and shrinks quite a lot to a perfect satin finish. After 24hours it is fully hardened and can be painted over.
I came to brush priming for the same reason you describe - I usually did my miniatures with grey or white spray primer. Then I would go on and would blacken all the areas I had not hit or that are too hard to reach with a brush and hard to see. Between legs, under robes, armpits, you get it. I then would have to retouch several areas. PITA.

So now I do everything in black. After hardening I hit the miniature with a grey or white mist spray through my airbrush or from a rattle can(zenital lighting). Simple gaming miniatures receive a heavier hit with grey spray primer from a high angle instead. This is because I work with opaque colours on those instead of glazes, so zenital pre-highlights make no sense here. But the dark areas still help pushing the contrast.
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Boaty McBoatface
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A wash, fairly thin but enough to visibly cover the figure.

Oddly I do this after the undercoat, after I have primed it I wash it.
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Edmond Hyland
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I used to use small amounts of brush-on primer for spots that the spray primer missed...
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Jake Staines
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Also consider acrylic gesso for priming. I've used Liquitex's, which you can get in black or white (and therefore make any shade of grey you like - but it's a warm black so you get warm greys). You can brush it on relatively thickly and it shrinks back as it dries, and forms a fairly good base layer. If you don't put enough on it can shrink away and leave gaps on the raised spots, but the advantage is that you don't have to worry too much about obscuring a little detail because it will slowly reveal as the gesso cures.

For board game miniatures, which are often made of flexible plastic, I would use a spray primer first and then touch up the gaps with the gesso - and obviously it's important to clean the mini well before priming anyway.

Jherek Carnelian wrote:

And really avoid black primer as much as you cancool


Point of order, but black primer has its uses!

Generally speaking, if you want a really dark figure that you highlight up to colour, prime with black; if you want a 'realistic' toned figure, prime with mid-grey, and if you want a cartoony GW-style bright-colours miniature then prime with white. The latter is often best for boardgame minis, of course, since they are often player-colour-coded!

Black priming is also useful for so-called 'zenithal' painting, where you prime black, spray white from the top-left (direction of light source) and then paint over that - which both gives you a guide to which parts of the mini to highlight and which parts to leave in shadow, and also (since most mini paints aren't totally opaque, particularly when thinned for use) leaves a subtle highlight/shadow showing through the paint job. (This is the mini-painting version of what kit builders call "preshading".)
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