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Subject: If somebody didn't like Trickerion, would they like Anachrony? rss

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Jesse Black
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Hello,

I haven't played either game. However, I backed Anachrony and think it looks great! However, I haven't heard a ton of rumblings about Trickerion. If somebody didn't like Trickerion, would they like Anachrony? How are the games similar? How are they different? What about Anachrony would change one's opinion about MindClash Games? These are all hypothetical questions. I'm just curious. Like mentioned, I think Anachrony looks amazing!
 
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Joseph Cochran
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The games are pretty much nothing alike. The main common tie is that they're from the same publisher. It's like asking if someone would like Terraforming Mars because they didn't like Space Cadets....
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Ben Turner
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As someone who is quite picky with Euros (I need theme ! Not too much downtime ! Challenging decisions ! Replayability ! Multiple strategies to try !) I must say, this is one helluva game. I'm a huge fan.

Trickerion I've not played, but reports from my groups have been mixed (between "OK" and "amazing"). Don't think any of the 7 people I've played this with have come away with anything under "very good".
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Daily Grind
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jsciv wrote:
The games are pretty much nothing alike. The main common tie is that they're from the same publisher. It's like asking if someone would like Terraforming Mars because they didn't like Space Cadets....

That's not entirely fair. The share a designer, not just a publisher. And they're both medium to medium heavy worker placement euros with variable player powers. Obviously the theme is radically different but there's a lot here in the mechanisms that overlaps much more than your example suggests.

I haven't played Anachrony yet, but I've seen enough gameplay footage to know we're comparing granny smith apples to gala apples. (As opposed to comparing an apple to a credenza.)

Having said that, Trickerion is awesome. I expect Anachrony to be equally amazing.
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W. Cracker
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I own Trickerion but haven't got it to the table yet. But the reason I bought it was the reviews I've read, podcasts and video reviews, I've heard nothing but very positive comments. Only one who didn't like it was Vasel, but he's not a big fan of Euros so I take his opinion with skepticism.
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Philemon
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Hey there. I've played both games and I have an unpopular opinion.

I'm a huge fan of heavy euro games like Kanban, Madeira, etc.
Both Trickerion & Anachrony has very nice artwork and component quality, and definitely thematic. I certainly admire them for that.

But for Trickerion, I found it unnecessary bloated and complicated (rules-heavy) for the depth it provides. Trickerion has a quite a bit of rules and exceptions. They are easy for me to understand but they take some effort and quite an amount of time to teach new people, and it gets tiresome. On top of it, there is quite a bit of rules reading and clarification midway, especially when it comes to the Dark Alley expansion. Of course, it will be easy after several games, but the learning curve is there. All-in-all, with this amount of bloat, I don't find the decision space that interesting and not a lot of brain-burn especially for that amount of time.

Clearly, I don't fancy Trickerion, and I felt that Anachrony has all the same problems. If you share the same sentiment as me for Trickerion, I'm sure that you'll feel the same for Anachrony. Too bloated, complicated, and time-consuming for the amount of depth it provides. And a lot of rules referencing too for some buildings and most superprojects.

That being said... if you love Trickerion, I don't see why you wouldn't love Anachrony too unless you feel strongly against the SciFi theme.

To each his own!
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Michael nut
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jdbc59 wrote:
Hello,

I haven't played either game. However, I backed Anachrony and think it looks great! However, I haven't heard a ton of rumblings about Trickerion. If somebody didn't like Trickerion, would they like Anachrony? How are the games similar? How are they different? What about Anachrony would change one's opinion about MindClash Games? These are all hypothetical questions. I'm just curious. Like mentioned, I think Anachrony looks amazing!


I got Anachrony last week and played two games and have played Trickerion once before (introductory game). There are similarities, as someone else said they're both medium-heavy worker placement games with a resource conversion element. Trickerion strikes me as more strategic, most of the information is available at the start of the game and you're trying to use your workers to take the best actions to get you what you need for a fairly limited reward (putting on a show with the best tricks). Anachrony has a bit more randomness with the variable buildings & super projects and more short term reward elements eg build the building, immediately get another place your workers can go without needing an exosuit. There's more options in Anachrony and more ways to get what you need.

Trickerion felt much tighter and longer and each decision was more important, Anachrony feels a little more forgiving and with a higher level of interaction.

That said, I'd happily say yes to a game of either of them!
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Brett Smith
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cafin8d wrote:
jsciv wrote:
The games are pretty much nothing alike. The main common tie is that they're from the same publisher. It's like asking if someone would like Terraforming Mars because they didn't like Space Cadets....

That's not entirely fair. The share a designer, not just a publisher. And they're both medium to medium heavy worker placement euros with variable player powers. Obviously the theme is radically different but there's a lot here in the mechanisms that overlaps much more than your example suggests.

I haven't played Anachrony yet, but I've seen enough gameplay footage to know we're comparing granny smith apples to gala apples. (As opposed to comparing an apple to a credenza.)

Having said that, Trickerion is awesome. I expect Anachrony to be equally amazing.


I would add they both have variable workers also that will grant you different special ability on where you place them in both games. I have played Trickerion a couple of times and read the Anachrony rule book and that was the most similar thing I walked away with is you have workers that can grant special ability/bonus where you place them in both games.
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Joseph Cochran
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cafin8d wrote:
jsciv wrote:
The games are pretty much nothing alike. The main common tie is that they're from the same publisher. It's like asking if someone would like Terraforming Mars because they didn't like Space Cadets....

That's not entirely fair. The share a designer, not just a publisher. And they're both medium to medium heavy worker placement euros with variable player powers. Obviously the theme is radically different but there's a lot here in the mechanisms that overlaps much more than your example suggests.


It's not an entirely fair question, either. I could have chosen a better example, sure, but the point stands: without context as to WHY "somebody didn't like Trickerion", it's not really fair to expect respondents to divine which things in Anachrony are like the things that the hypothetical somebody didn't hypothetically like and which are like the things they did like. If the question had a little more framework I'd be far more willing to give it a more complete answer. I've played both games. I was way more interested in playing Anachrony again after my first play than I was Trickerion (though I liked it and did/do want to play it more), and if someone told me why they didn't like it I'd be glad to offer a more informed opinion. But if you're just going to ask me if you'll like one based on disliking the other, the best answer I can give you is "that's a bad question."
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Phil McDonald
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I don't like most euro games. The most important part of a game for me is a strong, interesting and convincing theme. Whilst some euros do achieve this (and some superbly), the majority do not, IMHO.

To my taste, Trickerion is one of the exceptions. The theme is not only very strong, it is also a path less travelled. I have only played it twice so far. Once solo with 2 competing magicians to learn the rules and once as a 2p game. Both were hugely enjoyable. Will be playing a 3p game next week and am really looking forward to it.

My question would therefore be, if I love Trickerion, would I like Anachrony even more? But I suspect that question is equally unanswerable.

What I can say is that I shall almost certainly buy Anachrony when it hits retail because I enjoyed Trickerion so much. The review videos I have seen certainly look interesting.
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Lars F.
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philmcd wrote:
I don't like most euro games. The most important part of a game for me is a strong, interesting and convincing theme. Whilst some euros do achieve this (and some superbly), the majority do not, IMHO.

I'd be interested, what your other favorite euro games are.
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Phil McDonald
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Florino wrote:
philmcd wrote:
I don't like most euro games. The most important part of a game for me is a strong, interesting and convincing theme. Whilst some euros do achieve this (and some superbly), the majority do not, IMHO.

I'd be interested, what your other favorite euro games are.


Shipyard
Archipelago
Le Havre
Agricola
Kingsburg
The Pillars of the Earth
Forge War
Time of Soccer
The World Cup Game
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Lars F.
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philmcd wrote:
Florino wrote:
philmcd wrote:
I don't like most euro games. The most important part of a game for me is a strong, interesting and convincing theme. Whilst some euros do achieve this (and some superbly), the majority do not, IMHO.

I'd be interested, what your other favorite euro games are.


Shipyard
Archipelago
Le Havre
Agricola
Kingsburg
The Pillars of the Earth
Forge War
Time of Soccer
The World Cup Game

Except Shipyard and Agricola I have not played these – so thanks for some suggestions.
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Joseph Cochran
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philmcd wrote:
I don't like most euro games. The most important part of a game for me is a strong, interesting and convincing theme. Whilst some euros do achieve this (and some superbly), the majority do not, IMHO.

To my taste, Trickerion is one of the exceptions. The theme is not only very strong, it is also a path less travelled. I have only played it twice so far. Once solo with 2 competing magicians to learn the rules and once as a 2p game. Both were hugely enjoyable. Will be playing a 3p game next week and am really looking forward to it.


I will say that "taking a path less traveled" is something that I feel like Anachrony does extremely well. It also integrates the SF theme very strongly. From the time travel element to the handling of the mechs to the instigation of endgame and the way you get endgame points, it feels very organic to the theme. I was impressed with how immersed I felt in the world even while doing the worker placement and dealing with the game mechanics stuff (getting workers readied again.... so annoying). So if thematic integration is important to you I would guess that this will be a like for you.
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Kris Ardianto
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I own both of them. But the play counts are still a few.
Love them both, Trickerion has better theme in my taste, though Anachrony also has a good theme, and guess what, Time Travel in a board game, rarely done and this comes up pretty well.

I will try to compare these two based on categories:
Components
Trickerion has a lot of bits, more bits than Anachrony. More cards too.
So it is safe to say that Anachrony is more streamlined in component than Trickerion.

Weight
Trickerion has a lot of bits, but what makes Anachrony so heavy in weight and bigger box are the miniatures.

Complexity
Trickerion has more complex game play, due to the restrictions and also the trick book that need constantly be checked, which I think it's fiddly.
Anachrony is more solid in terms of simple streamlined gameplay. The only complicated thing is about the time travel.

Table Space
Trickerion wins this one, with bigger main board and more of it is because Trickerion player board can be expandable during the game from Assistant hiring. Anachrony main board is surprisingly small. It player boards has the same size as Trickerion, but it fixed (not expandable).

So I guess from these, my opinion is that Anachrony seems easier to hit the table than Trickerion. Also, though game length could be vary, I guess from our experience with Trickerion, Anachrony is a little bit shorter in game length.
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David Kiehnhoff
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Played Trickerion once and didn't finish due to lack of enjoyment and complexity-to-depth issues mentioned in an earlier reply. After one play of Anachrony I'm feeling they are quite similar in this regard. For me, both are really intriguing thematically without the mechanics to make them enjoyable gaming experiences. I hadn't considered comparing the two until seeing this post, but I think it's a totally valid question based on my experiences.
 
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galin54 wrote:
Played Trickerion once and didn't finish due to lack of enjoyment and complexity-to-depth issues mentioned in an earlier reply. After one play of Anachrony I'm feeling they are quite similar in this regard. For me, both are really intriguing thematically without the mechanics to make them enjoyable gaming experiences. I hadn't considered comparing the two until seeing this post, but I think it's a totally valid question based on my experiences.


We should keep in mind, though, that the lead designer is Dávid Turczi, who also designed [redacted] and Days of Ire: Budapest 1956. So while the tendency toward graphical design overlaps with Trickerion, the underlying core was constructed by a different designer.

I don't know whether that should make a difference or not, but it seems like no one had pointed that out in this thread yet.
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wombat929 wrote:
galin54 wrote:
Played Trickerion once and didn't finish due to lack of enjoyment and complexity-to-depth issues mentioned in an earlier reply. After one play of Anachrony I'm feeling they are quite similar in this regard. For me, both are really intriguing thematically without the mechanics to make them enjoyable gaming experiences. I hadn't considered comparing the two until seeing this post, but I think it's a totally valid question based on my experiences.


We should keep in mind, though, that the lead designer is Dávid Turczi, who also designed [redacted] and Days of Ire: Budapest 1956. So while the tendency toward graphical design overlaps with Trickerion, the underlying core was constructed by a different designer.

I don't know whether that should make a difference or not, but it seems like no one had pointed that out in this thread yet.


Thanks, that's a good distinction. I didn't realize the relationship with [redacted] though the one time I played it, it was rocky to say the least. The group didn't enjoy that experience either, but to me Anachrony feels more like Trickerion than [redacted]. I'd say that whatever elements connect these three games, they just aren't a good fit for me or the people I play with.
 
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galin54 wrote:
wombat929 wrote:
galin54 wrote:
Played Trickerion once and didn't finish due to lack of enjoyment and complexity-to-depth issues mentioned in an earlier reply. After one play of Anachrony I'm feeling they are quite similar in this regard. For me, both are really intriguing thematically without the mechanics to make them enjoyable gaming experiences. I hadn't considered comparing the two until seeing this post, but I think it's a totally valid question based on my experiences.


We should keep in mind, though, that the lead designer is Dávid Turczi, who also designed [redacted] and Days of Ire: Budapest 1956. So while the tendency toward graphical design overlaps with Trickerion, the underlying core was constructed by a different designer.

I don't know whether that should make a difference or not, but it seems like no one had pointed that out in this thread yet.


Thanks, that's a good distinction. I didn't realize the relationship with [redacted] though the one time I played it, it was rocky to say the least. The group didn't enjoy that experience either, but to me Anachrony feels more like Trickerion than [redacted]. I'd say that whatever elements connect these three games, they just aren't a good fit for me or the people I play with.


[redacted] does have a rocky start. It was the first game for all of us involved. I've only met 2 kinds of people: didn't get their first game, never played again OR somebody took the time to explain everything properly, made sure rules are promptly followed, etc. They probably played it dozen of times afterwards, having legendary laughs and exciting reveals.

That said, I don't think there is anything similar between [redacted] and Anachrony. (I try not to have a "style".) I took an earlier version of Anachrony TO MindClash because after being amazed by Trickerion I felt this would be a good fit for them. Then they spent more than a year developing it/designing additional stuff to it, so they certainly made it more "theirs". And I'm happy that I took it to them, they're awesome. (Check out their next game too )

If you want to see a game where my hand is definitely felt, check out Days of Ire.
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Christopher Wood
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Simple answer: yes, they might. I own and love both games; my brother-in-law, with whom I frequently play board games, was traumatized by Trickerion's complexity. However, he began praising Anachrony a few turns in. Anachrony is kind of like 7 Wonders in the sense that once you understand the iconography it's relatively easy to follow. I imagine it will probably be easier for me to get Anachrony to the table in the future.

Besides, who can resist a game with awesome minis!
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Well, it depends on WHY you didn't like Trickerion. I myself, prefer Trickerion. It is more complex, and you can plan a starting strategy & stick to it. Also the expansions make the game more fun. Now Anachrony is simpler, and you can't really start with a plan (Unless you play Doomsday expansion where 2 people want to save the world, and 2 want to hasten its destruction (The religious Fanatics and the "Destroy the environment so we can build more stuff and progress faster") Hmm... was the political message intentional?

Anyway, you basically want to build stuff to gain VP and you need to build a time travel project to pay back the stuff you borrowed from the future, or you gain negative VP.

Anachrony is easier to play on the fly, as you don't need to plan as much and is easier to teach. The Icon instructions on the tiles take a while to understand, and it would have been better to include 4 Rosetta stone guidebooks so everyone is not needing to refer to the oversized rulebook until you can read the hieroglyphics on your own. You don't have to plan where you send your workers, so if someone takes what you wanted, you can send your worker somewhere else. Resources are NOT reusable here, so you will spend a lot of time gathering them so you can build the best projects. In Trickerion, once you got your materials you planned how and when to perform your tricks to earn the most fame. You actually need to read the Art Book in Anachrony to learn the backstory and feel the theme in my opinion.
Otherwise, the main rulebook makes the goal seem like "He or She who dies with the most toys, Wins!!" while the actual goal is a little better.

Also, Anachrony has a good (not great, but quite well thought out) solo game and Trickerion is for 2-4 only.
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