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Subject: Painting Tutorial : Orc Starter Set : Orc Bodies with the Army Painter rss

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Introduction: I'll be posting tutorials with multiple similar sculpts, including updates to the orc arms with weapons, orc arms with shields, and orc heads (expect more orclings!). The orc bodies (backs and torsos) have less details than the smaller parts, and I found it difficult to create a color scheme. Brown Strong Tone Ink is from the Army Painter Starter Set, as well as the Quickshade Ink set. The grey Hardened Carapace, used for grey and blacklining (using black, brown, or grey between two painted areas to help define them) is from the Undead Paint Set, although you can mix your own grey. (You can purchase these paints individually, of course.)

Assembly: Unlike boardgame plastic, hobby multi-piece models aren't known for their ease of assembly. The arm pegs will need a little trimming, but can fit without glue. The heads don't fit at all well and will need to be trimmed, and there will be a gap you will need to fill in with plastic putty or other filler. Many painters will assemble parts of the model first, although sometimes this means part of the model will block your brush when painting. However, gluing the painted head into the gap then carefully filling the gap with putty then painting it without painting over the previously painted pieces is also a little tricky. I just assembled these pieces after painting only because it was, for me, easier to make unique models after painting.

Priming: You can either color prime with Army Painter Leather Brown, then paint black the metallic areas. Or you can spray paint with black, then paint brown the non-metallic areas. I brush-primed the metallic areas black, and other areas white, although I'm not sure I'd recommend this, because of the dreaded white zone that appears on white-primed miniatures that aren't painted exactly.

Headless and armless bodies


Flesh: The flesh areas will be painted from shade to highlight, so were first painted dark Angel Green.

Other non-metallic areas: After priming, I painted some backs brown Werewolf Fur, and other backs grey Hardened Carapace for variety.

 
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Re: Painting Tutorial : Orc Bodies with the Army Painter
Brown: Brown areas were highlighted with light Fur Brown then washed with brown Strong Tone Ink. Fur Brown was useful as an undercoat for the red leggings on the model.



Flesh: The flesh was further highlighted with light green Goblin Green.

Red: The leggings were painted dark red Crusted Sore. You can further highlight them with a brighter red from your starter set. I used Dragon Red from the Undead Paint Set.



Base: I just used brown craft paint for the initial layer on the base. I later used brown Werewolf Fur for the ground, and grey Hardened Carapace for the rock near the foot.

Metal: For the first layer, I applied a mix of black and metallic. Then, holding the miniature near a strong light, highlighted with pure metallic the reflected areas, as well as edges of metal pieces. There's enough detail that you can just paint metallic whichever pieces reflect, rather than any fancy reflection painting technique.



Head Assembly: The head pegs don't fit into the holes, so you'll have to trim them a bit. This scrapes away paint, so you will end up supergluing the plastic head peg to the plastic of the model, rather than gluing paint to paint, which you don't want. Note that, at tabletop level, you can't see the gap underneath the head, which you will want to fill with plastic putty, then paint brown or gray. As said, filling in the putty is more work on painted pieces than unpainted, because you have to avoid applying putty to the painted surfaces.



Arm Assembly: The arm pegs on the model needed to be trimmed a little, but, otherwise, arm assembly is quite easy. You can even use these pegs on unpainted models to hold the arms for painting!


 
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Re: Painting Tutorial : Orc Bodies with the Army Painter
Orc Bodies with Arms


First layers of basecoats:
Flesh: Dark Angel Green.
Leather Armor: Brown Werewolf Fur.
Leggings: Dark red Crusted Sore.
Base: Dark brown craft paint.




Second layer of basecoats:
Flesh: Light Goblin Green.
Leather Armor: Brown (Dirt Splatter from the Zombicide core set, but use your own or the light Fur Brown).
Leggings: Red (Dragon Red from the Undead Paint set, or you can use your own from a starter set).
Base: Brown (I forgot to do this step).




Washes:
Flesh: Green Tone Ink.
Leather armor: Brown Strong Tone Ink (from the Army Painter Starter Set).




Metal: As before, I first painted a mix of black and metallic, then metallic. When painting metallic, hold the miniature near strong light and paint pure metallic the reflecting areas.




Wash over Metal: The figures were washed again with brown Strong Tone Ink.





Assembly: The pegs of the head were trimmed to fit the hole and superglued in. Then I carefully filled the gap with plastic putty.




Grey: I used grey Hardened Carapace from the Undead Paint Set to fill in the white area near the head, as well as other "white zones" on the model. You can also make your own grey from your starter set paints.

 
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Re: Painting Tutorial : Orc Bodies with the Army Painter
Orc Bodies with Heads


First Layer: Similar to the previous models, the flesh was painted green Angel Green, clothing and base painted brown Werewolf Fur, leggings red Crusted Sore, and hood and straps grey Hardened Carapace.




Flesh: Flesh was then highlighted with the lighter Goblin Green, then washed with Green Tone Ink.




Skull: The skull was then painted ochre Skeleton Bone from the Undead Paint Set (you can make your own ochre from yellow, white, and brown), and the skull and clothing washed with brown Strong Tone Ink (from the Army Painter Starter Set).




Cloth: Cloth and leggings were further painted bright Dragon Red from the Starter Set, although you can use any bright red (and can paint the clothes any color you want). I chose red as a complimentary color to green, although I think "contrasting color" might be a better term!




Brown, Second Layer: Another layer of brown was applied, including the kneecap armor straps.




Metallic: As in the other models, I first applied a mix of black and metallic as a basecoat. I then held the miniature next to strong light and painted pure metallic on the reflected parts.




Wash: Finally, the armor and some other brown areas were washed with brown Strong Tone Ink, from the Army Painter Starter Set. The eye of the helmet particularly may need to be washed in case metallic paint covers the slit.




A few models with arms attached.


 
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Fantastic stuff, please keep the articles coming ! I have a mantic undead army collecting dust atm so this is quite motivating. How do you find the clean up ? I went all in on dreadball and I nearly lost the will to live cleaning the mold lines off the restic....
 
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Yes, clean up takes a *long* time. I know some painters who don't remove mold lines they can't see. I guess my motivation for prep work is that it's hard to screw up, unlike painting!

For mold lines, I use a hobby knife ($5) and Vallejo Plastic Putty ($3.50). Jeweler's files ($5) and an engraving pen ($10+) from the local art store and Harbor Freight are helpful. I hear sanding needles are good, but can't find them locally.

Okay, gore rider orcs coming up...!
 
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Gore Riders

Mold lines: Being made of soft plastic, the gore riders are more of a paint to scrape. Many of the mold lines run across the fur on their backs, making them tricky to remove. Sorry jadh! laugh

Mounting: A bag of corks from Michael's is inexpensive, so, if you don't have something to hold your miniatures while you're painting them, pick up a bag. Drill a hole into the figures, and mount them on corks. I just held the figures by their arm sockets, feet, etc. as I painted, and let dry on a plastic ziplock bag. (I use the bags to store the pieces after I paint them.) The Army Painter hand drill is under $10 at Miniature Market, and can use paperclip wire.

Priming: I spray primed the miniatures with black hardware primer.

Undercoating: Like the other bodies, I undercoated with brown Army Painter's Werewolf Fur.



Flesh: Again, I started with the dark green Angel Green, followed by lighter green Goblin Green, a wash with the Green Tone Ink, then highlights with Goblin Green.

Red: However, so I wouldn't accidentally paint over a completed area, I painted dark red Crusted Sore on the leggings and eyes before the painting the flesh with Goblin Green. For the eyes and legging highlights, you may wish to paint with a brighter red after finishing the flesh and fur. I used Dragon Red from the Undead Paint set, but the red from the Starter Set should also work. The last picture is a close-up of the helmet-less orc head, with the highlight color emphasizing the brow, nose, and upper lip of the head.











Fur and Clothing: For the fur, I experimented with various browns, and painted from the darkest brown to the lightest, highlighted with ochre Skeleton Bone (you can mix some yellow and white into brown to make ochre), then washed with brown Strong Tone ink. I then repeated this without the ink. If the fur looks good to you at any point, don't bother continuing. You might want to paint the clothing brown at this point, although I neglected to.





Teeth: Teeth were painted with ochre Skeleton Bone, followed by the brown Strong Tone ink. Beside the teeth, you can wash the face, flesh, armor (after painting it), etc.





Armor and Helmets: I first started with a 2:1 mixture of black to metallic Gun Metal, then held the miniature to bright light (front, back, and top) and painted the reflective areas in pure metallic. You could add a step between where you painted the armor 1:1 black to metallic. I might wash with the brown Strong Tone later, but there's more to work on for these limbless riders!

 
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More headless guys

Prime, Undercoat, and Basecoat: Okay, starting to run out of descriptions for headless guys, but, after priming in black, I undercoated the green flesh, red clothing, and any brown areas with brown paint. Then I started the basecoats with dark green Angel Green for flesh, dark red Crusted Sore for clothing, and grey-black Hardened Carapace for the "hood". Hardened Carapace is part of the Undead paint set, and you can use grey mixed with black instead, or just leave it black.

Metal: Paint the metallic parts with a mix of half black, half metallic. Holding the miniature to the light, paint the reflective parts metallic.



Wash: If you only have the Greenskin Paint Set's Green Tone and Starter Set's brown Strong Tone, wash the flesh green, and the rest of the miniature brown. Otherwise, wash the flesh green, the red clothing red with the Quickshade Ink Set's Red Tone, and the metal parts with the Quickshade Ink Set's Dark Tone.



Flesh Highlights: Starting off with a mix of half dark Angel Green and half light Goblin Green, work your way up to mostly Goblin Green. Use the Green Tone Ink to dilute your paints.



Red Highlights: Starting with a mix of dark red Crusted Sore and bright red, work your way up to mostly bright red. You can also use the orange Dry Rust as an undercoat, and Quickshade Ink Set's Red Tone to dilute your paints. You can also use the Quickshade Ink Set's Purple Tone to shade the recesses. The Starter Set has Pure Red as a bright red. I happened to use the Undead Paint Set's Dragon Red.



Brown Highlights: At a minimum, just use a brown and the brown Strong Tone wash to highlight brown areas. You can, of course, use different browns for different brown areas. Orange Dry Rust and an ochre paint, such as the Undead Paint Set's Skeleton Bone, can be mixed with brown to lighten the color.



Metal: If the miniature could still use some metal, you can optionally wash it again with the black Dark Tone, and highlight the metallic parts with metallic paint by holding the miniature next to strong light and painting the reflected areas. You may also wish to paint the details, as well as the edges of any shapes that are hard to see in normal light.







 
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Greataxe Bodies: With this being the last set of bodies to paint (and the instructions pretty much the same as the others), I experimented by painting the primer, undercoats, and base colors, with another company brand, best known for its paint pots, and duplicate paints I had in my collection. Specifically, I sped up the painting slightly by using paints straight from the pots, and using paint on a dry palette, without worrying about wasting excess paint. I would leave the tidying up of stray paint marks for later painting. I think this is something you should at least try if you're in the situation, although I don't recommend GW paints, being more expensive and my own set bought on sale -- and dried to the consistency of sludge. If you do get psints in pots, black and brown are good for undercoats. From this experiment, I would say that priming, undercoating, and basecoating from the pot is more convenient than an eye dropper and wet palette. After a wash, you can see that you have tabletop quality. However, you will also see that you will want to use the eye droppers and a wet palette so you can raise the model to advanced tabletop.

Primer, Undercoat, Basecoat, and Wash: As described above. Obviously, your results will depend on what paints you start out with. I had a starter set of pots, with some duplicate eye droppers. Note that the Purple Tone from the Quickshade Ink Set was used, to shade the red areas. Metallic areas are undercoated in black primer.



Flesh: With a good undercoat and basecoat as a foundation, I found it easier to blend in the highlights and add shade. All of these paints are from the Army Painter Greenskin paint set.



Red: Same for red. Of these colors, Crusted Sore and Dry Rust (orange is a good highlighter color to mix into red before painting) are from the Greenskins set. Red Tone is from the Quickshade Ink Set. Instead of Dragon Red, and Glistening Blood, use a bright red from an Army Painter starter paint set.



Black: I painted the "hood" of the miniature with the organic black, Hardened Carapace, from the Undead paint set, with some black for better coverage. Use a dark grey with black if you don't have this color. You also don't have to color this part of the miniature dark grey.



Brown: I used brown Strong Tone on the brown basecoat and undercoat areas and had satisfactory results. You can use various brown paints (mix in some orange to highlight) if you want further detailing.



Metallics: As before, I painted the metallic areas in metallic with black. Then I held the image to strong light, and painted the reflected areas, as well as edges, in pure or mostly metallic.





 
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