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War in the Pacific: 1941-1945» Forums » Rules

Subject: India, Mainland USA and a few other questions rss

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Robert Crawford
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I like the mechanics of this game. Enjoying my first solo play. Particularly like that you have to save RPs for repairing units and that can be less than efficient. Can see how this would be really good FtF--lots of misdirection possible. Wish I had the time to write up a full review.

A few questions from the first few turns:

1) Rules state that units in "Mainland USA" and "India" are always in supply. Where are these areas defined? Does "Mainland USA" include Alaska? Does India include Rangoon and Ceylon? The latter is particularly important for depot placement on T1.

2) The examples of play indicate that it costs an extra RP to enter a hex with an enemy air unit, but the movement rules only state that you pay an extra RP when moving a stack adjacent to an enemy air unit. Does it cost +RP to enter a hex with an enemy air unit?

3) The rules state that there is standard Allied depot set-up for T1 on the player reference card, but I can't find it.

4) Victory conditions. 2.2 is missing a statement of circumstances for Japanese victory. I assume the Japanese win if the last turn (T16) is reached and the Allies have not achieved an automatic victory (as defined by 2.2). Is that correct?

5) The only Allied country that can be conquered is China, correct? There are no rules regarding the conquest of India or Australia.

6) If a friendly base (flag) is conquered but subsequently unoccupied, does control return to the original (flag) owner? Assume yes by 1.3, but want to be sure.

7) Once a unit is destroyed there is no way to rebuild it. Is that correct?

(Edited to add another question)

Thanks for any answers.
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Steve Pole

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Robert,


I'm really glad that you are enjoying WIP. As you say, the scope for deception and feints makes it a really fun F-2-F game.

Many thanks for your questions. I have taken the liberty of posting them and my answers to the CSW site for White Dog where there are others in a similar vein.

Turning to each in turn:

1) Apologies for the lack of clarity here. The term "Mainland" American does include Alaska (and Canada). India includes Ceylon; but, not Rangoon.

2) There is no cost for moving onto a hex containing an enemy Air unit. This is because in most such instances the Air unit will either be obliged to re-locate (in which case it would not harass the friendly force) or a combat will ensue (in which the Air unit's presence will be reflected).

3) My copy of the game has yet to arrive, so I can't be sure; but, other gamers have raised the same issue so it would appear that the Set Up has been omitted in error, for which I can only apologise. I think that the suggested initial Allied placement is as follows: 0207, 0509, 0607, 0710, 1205 and 1407. This should result in all Allied air and combat units being in supply. If it doesn't, please don't hesitate to revert to me.

4) Yes, that's correct: the final sentence of Rule 2.2 applies.

5) Again correct. Simply occupying a base in either Australia or India is sufficient for the Japanese to gain an advantage (Rule 12.4).

6) Correct.

7) Correct.
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Robert Crawford
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Steve,

Thanks for the answers!

I will probably have a few more questions by the time I'm done with my solo playthrough, but this one just came up:

8) Is the countermix a limit on how many depots I can deploy? I assume that it is, but seeking clarification.

 
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Steve Pole

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Robert,

8) Correct. The limit is important as it obliges players to deploy depots efficiently by incorporating logistical planning within their overall strategy and to protect them lest their lines of communication are severed. It also means that, just as happened historically, as these lines extend so strategic options tend to diminish.

Regards,


Steve
12.3.17








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Robert Crawford
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OK, thanks for the explanation.

So, a supply depot that's eliminated, like other units, can not be rebuilt?

The rules state that a supply depot is "eliminated" when it is alone with an enemy ground unit. Other unit types can not be rebuilt after they are "eliminated."

Sorry for all the questions, but I'm working through my first game.
 
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Steve Pole

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Robert,

There's no need to apologise for the questions. I'm sure that other gamers have the same issues so the questions (together, I hope, with my replies) assist everyone.

When play-testing we didn't allow depots which had been eliminated to return to the game. As far as I am aware, this did not cause any particular issues during testing.

However, prior to production we needed to reduce the number of counters slightly so that they would fit onto a single sheet; and, I think I'm correct in saying that we did this by removing one (or two?) Japanese depot counters. During testing the Japanese had seven (or eight?) depots available so I'm assuming that there are fewer in the published game.

We felt able to make this reduction because the Japanese never seem to use their full quota of depots.

By way of background, the more my friends and I read about the war, the more that the importance of logistical considerations/constraints became apparent. The long distances involved made it impractical to supply front-line troops directly from the initial point of supply: principally, Japan, the West Coast of America and South Africa (for the British). So, the belligerents tended to establish chains of “depots”. The main "rear area” depots were substantial and intended to be permanent, and depot counters are intended to represent these. Their location was crucial if a campaign was to be conducted in the most efficient and effective manner. Some of the Japanese strategic disasters in particular reflected a failure to pay sufficient attention to logistical constraints.

(The rear area depots fed much smaller depots - “supply dumps”, in effect - at or close to the front line which were often fairly temporary arrangements. These do not feature in the game.)

Regards,



Steve
13.3.17





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