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It seems cool to be able to get some new exciting games with exclusive Kickstarter extras, but it also seems more expensive, and a bit risky (the game may not be any good).

Do you guys think it's worth it? I haven't backed a game yet, but once it's in the budget, I'm tempted.

Are there some good Kickstarter games that have only been available through Kickstarter, and never went to retail? That's another reason I'm tempted to start doing some.

Thanks for any feedback!
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Eddy Sterckx
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TrustyMutsi wrote:

Are there some good Kickstarter games that have only been available through Kickstarter, and never went to retail?


No.

But that all depends on your definition of "good".
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You can spend $50 or whatever on a game that does not exist, that you will not get for a long time, maybe never, maybe a game that isn't any good.

Or you can spend $50 on a game that already exists, is known to be good, that you can try out on someone else's copy, and that you can have in your hands right now.

For me it's a no-brainer. If I have some cash I wouldn't mind putting in a campfire, I might consider Kickstarting a game. Otherwise, no thanks.
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TrustyMutsi wrote:
It seems cool to be able to get some new exciting games with exclusive Kickstarter extras, but it also seems more expensive, and a bit risky (the game may not be any good).

Do you guys think it's worth it? I haven't backed a game yet, but once it's in the budget, I'm tempted.

Are there some good Kickstarter games that have only been available through Kickstarter, and never went to retail? That's another reason I'm tempted to start doing some.

Thanks for any feedback!

My answer is no.

1. You will get the game even a few years after the campaign, your taste or situation may change until then, being excited by it now, does not mean much for the future you.
2. KS buys into the preorder cultures which is very bad for customers, you are buying promises not a game, it is untested, not reviewed and may be really, really bad.
3. To sell a KS game mostly looks matter, so you get a ton of miniatures but the games are often underdeveloped and not balances enough, as those things do not matter for the company.
4. KS creates better and worse owners often withholding important game elements from those who buy it in the stores, fear of missing out on the add-ons is the main thing which drives KS buyers.

Sure, you can get a great and unique game at KS. But let's face it, each year there are thousands of new games. There is a game out there that you do not own, can buy it in the store, after watching reviews for it and have it at your home... now. Do that.
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borsook wrote:
TrustyMutsi wrote:
It seems cool to be able to get some new exciting games with exclusive Kickstarter extras, but it also seems more expensive, and a bit risky (the game may not be any good).

Do you guys think it's worth it? I haven't backed a game yet, but once it's in the budget, I'm tempted.

Are there some good Kickstarter games that have only been available through Kickstarter, and never went to retail? That's another reason I'm tempted to start doing some.

Thanks for any feedback!

My answer is no.

1. You will get the game even a few years after the campaign, your taste or situation may change until then, being excited by it now, does not mean much for the future you.
2. KS buys into the preorder cultures which is very bad for customers, you are buying promises not a game, it is untested, not reviewed and may be really, really bad.
3. To sell a KS game mostly looks matter, so you get a ton of miniatures but the games are often underdeveloped and not balances enough, as those things do not matter for the company.
4. KS creates better and worse owners often withholding important game elements from those who buy it in the stores, fear of missing out on the add-ons is the main thing which drives KS buyers.

Sure, you can get a great and unique game at KS. But let's face it, each year there are thousands of new games. There is a game out there that you do not own, can buy it in the store, after watching reviews for it and have it at your home... now. Do that.


There are plenty of games that are tested, reviewed and are really, really good that have used KS as their marketing portal. Just off the top of my head - Gloomhaven, Lisboa, Scythe, and of Dr. Finn's games, any of the Tiny Epic games, Vinhos, and The Gallerist. Doing a "pre-order" is no different than doing a pre-order at any other publisher - ie, GMT, Victory Point Games and several of the big ones. And I'm not aware of any game that leaves out important game elements, unless you consider wood upgrades important.

Look, there are many duds in KS, but there are many duds in regular retail too. There are also many, many great games that have come through KS that would not have seen the light of day without it. Do your research, not only on the game, but the designer and publisher and you should be fine.
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Most good games will go to retail, but finding all the extra bling for them will be expensive or impossible in many cases. It is a risk, so do your homework, but the risk is why most KS games offer exclusive promos. Be aware also that most delivery estimates are wrong, and games may take way longer to deliver due to unforeseen delays. All that being said I LOVE kick starter, my wallet definitely doesn't!
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If you like a game filled with exclusive extras then kickstarter might be for you. If you want a game to be good, then you might not. Good games do get produced on kickstarter, most of the great ones get a retail release however.

Pros: tons of miniatures
Cons: game sucks
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Despite what others have said already, there are some really good games that would never have been if they were not Kickstarted.
There are also some really good games. It depends what you like and if you've managed to establish what sorts of games you enjoy.

Most Kickstarter games have full rule books already which you can read. Most have a print and play which you can try first. As long as you educate yourself and know what your interests are then Kickstarter is great. If you're an impulse buyer and don't do any research on the game the company or the people behind it, then you might get burned.

Out of the 49 projects I have backed there was one game I didn't like and another set of dice which the creator has yet to deliver 3 years later. If you don't mind those odds, do plenty of research, know what you enjoy, and are patient, then Kickstarted games are great.
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Mark Jackson
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I would strongly recommend that you avoid Kickstarter games until you have more boardgaming experience and a more solid idea of what you like and dislike. It's extremely easy to get caught up in the hype and waste a TON of money on games that you won't actually enjoy or play. You own 8 games... There are a practically infinite number of great games that are in print and known quantities for you to explore and enjoy before you start throwing your money at Kickstarter games.
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You're going to get a lot of KS bashing on BGG, but here's why I do it:

* The miniatures. It's hard to evaluate how well a boardgame will play, and even if you find a good review of a *retail* game, you may not like it once you've played it. Why wait several months for a boardgame when you can get a proven game that's been played more at an OLGS sale? Miniatures, meanwhile, are much easier to visually judge, although a general guideline I use is "render are not miniatures".

* Hardcore. Some gamers want *everything* for a game, and KS is the only way to get it. Most boardgames won't support more than two expansions, meaning most game designers create more content than the market will support. That's not because the game is necessarily bad, it might because the game is so niche that you won't get Magic the Gathering-sized audiences for it. Distributors also want something like a 40% discount from MSRP before they'll even *look* at a game, which prohibit expensive boutique game some gamers like.

* Value. By skipping the middlemen (distributors and retailers), the creator passes on savings to you (although you will pay shipping, which keeps rising year after year). This saving typically means more stuff, not lower prices.

Here's why you don't do it:

* Base games. Many KS base games, particularly those sold by larger companies such as CMON, will be sold at the market, and you can get them on sale from the OLGS.

* Research. If you don't research into the creator, you aren't evaluating the risk of the project -- and may not even get what you backed. Some companies, like CMON, are a safe bet, but many First Created projects aren't.

* Delays. Entrepreneurs tend to be overly optimistic. Yes, they know the risks, but risks are what happens to *other* people. Their project will go on time. No, it won't.

Many expensive boutique games don't go to retail because they would cost more than the market would support. Cthulhu Wars, Mythic Battles: Pantheon, and Kingdom Death: Monster are examples. Scythe and Gloomhaven had temporary retail shortages. Outside of boardgames, it's *very* common for miniatures to only be available through the creator's website.
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I have only used kickstarter once and I don't think I will again. Not because its the devil but because the wait from paying to receiving is too long for me. I can only afford a small collection so buying a game and having it now is a much more effective use of money. Don't use KS as a way to speculate there will be more misfires than gains but you won't hear about them. If you have plenty of disposable income you may find some of the more ambitious projects attractive, as a side note these will attract more independent reviews and not just the paid reviews which seem common.
So to conclude KS is both good and bad which doesn't help anyone it's better to judge on a game by game basis.
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Gianluca Casu
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Many games that are on KS offer a PnP option, so you buy the complete game files for a fraction of the price.

If you (as I do) have fun creating resources and playing with graphics this is the best deal possible.
 
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I got into this hobby last year, I pledged for around 15 kickstarter projects so far and I've been VERY VERY happy with 14 of them.

One game that got only kickstarted and hasn't seen a retail release so far is Crisis.
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Joel L
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Many people treat Kickstarter as just another online store to purchase games, but I believe that's the wrong approach. Kickstarter is an avenue to support independent designer-publishers who might not get their game to market another way. You get to watch a game transform from an idea to a finished product, and maybe even influence the design along the way. If that sounds appealing to you, Kickstarter can be a lot of fun.

If you just want to buy cool games, there are thousands already available at retail stores across the world. Don't waste your time with Kickstarter.
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Joel_L wrote:
Many people treat Kickstarter as just another online store to purchase games, but I believe that's the wrong approach. Kickstarter is an avenue to support independent designer-publishers who might not get their game to market another way. You get to watch a game transform from an idea to a finished product, and maybe even influence the design along the way. If that sounds appealing to you, Kickstarter can be a lot of fun.

If you just want to buy cool games, there are thousands already available at retail stores across the world. Don't waste your time with Kickstarter.

Good point, it should be like that... but... now we have Queen Games, AEG, Cool mini or not and other big, established companies dominating kickstarter. The companies treat it as a preorder system, so the customers do too. Times of KS being full of small, independent projects are gone. These projects are there, but they are easy to miss.
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Pros
* some people enjoy being part of the hype long before a game is actually released; some prefer this to actually playing games
* some campaigns actually take backer feedback into account
* some campaigns offer KickStarter exclusive content that is often nice for people who feel an urge to "own it all"
* some games won't actually get published without grassroots support
* team creating the game gets more income from each sale than if you buy through normal retail channels
* some games get small print runs and aren't easily available later

Cons
* often it's cheaper to buy post-KickStarter (exception: exclusive content tends to be pricey on second-hand market, but often isn't needed)
* your money is collected far in advance of actually getting your game, so be sure your budget is ok with having funds spent that way
* delays (often for many months) from initial shipping estimates are very common
* significant risk that game won't be as good as you hoped
* although rare if you do your research ahead of time, it's possible you won't receive anything at all

I still back KickStarter projects occasionally, but have found that it's rarely a good value proposition when there are so many excellent games already available for good prices right now. But if you see something that gets you excited and makes you think "I'd like to support the people doing this", then there are worse ways to spend your money.

Full KickStarter disclosure: currently backing 1 board game, 1 board game promo, and 1 graphic novel that all piqued my interest; signed on as a late-backer for 1 game that convinced me later it would be fun to play, even though I wasn't ready to commit during the campaign; considering backing 1 of two other projects but not yet sure the cost-benefit works for me.


Edit #1: One other note to consider is that exceptional games are usually reprinted later, and reprints often include corrections and/or improvements for any issues found in the first printing. How much that matters is hard to gauge, and it's not something you can count on...

Edit #2: Something that seemed odd to me but has become somewhat "normal": many (not all) projects now allow late-backers to buy all content without any qualms, many months after the original campaign has ended. This lets you keep money in your pocket longer and might allow some more information to come out about the project and it's estimated delivery. Worth considering in some cases.
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Haha the haters always come out when someone posts a Kickstarter thread. Don't get too caught up in other people's spite for the model. It doesn't appeal to everyone, but it's a really satisfying one to others, obviously you have to decide for yourself if it's a viable model for you to put your money in to.

As others here have mentioned, go in with critical eyes. Read the rulebook (if there isnt one available, then proceed with caution....). Watch reviews/playthroughs. I never have, but if you are really undecided print out the PnP. Check out the creator's history and reputation. If you are undecided, back for $1.00 and give yourself a bit of time to watch the project unfold, and use the pledge manager later to back a full copy if you decide it's worth it.

It is not that hard to avoid getting burned if you aren't a complete sucker for flash and hype. Solid and dependable creators and games are available through Kickstarter, often for a discounted price and with upgrades or exclusives. Sometimes you might get lucky and end up with a hyped game you can sell for a profit, but don't count on this!

Not only is it cool to be directly responsible for helping a game to come to life, but Kickstarter itself has admirable corporate values and goals. So backing a project helps fund those initiatives, but also promotes the concept, in general, of businesses concerning themselves with more than just revenue.

I would say that if you are all about cash and getting guaranteed games at the best price, then waiting for games to hit retail, playing before purchase and then buying at a reduced OLGS price is your best bet.

Conversely, if you seek satisfaction in the less tangible benefits derived from a Kickstarter type interaction (with the possibility of reduced prices/exclusives) then it is worth giving it a shot.
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Sam and Max wrote:
You're going to get a lot of KS bashing on BGG, but here's why I do it:

* The miniatures.

I see you got right to the point. Props for honesty

Jorath wrote:
I have only used kickstarter once and I don't think I will again. Not because its the devil but because the wait from paying to receiving is too long for me.

Definitely agree. I would never pay for any consumer product up front, then wait a year to get it.

People argue that some creators reliably make good stuff, and/or reliably deliver as promised, making the risk low. This may be so, but it still won't pull me in. Even if the risk is zero, I am not paying that far in advance. Even having played Scythe, knowing how good it is, and knowing for sure I would get it, I would still not pay a year in advance. No way, not happening, never.

I would also say that the experienced/reliable creators are the ones who least need KS. With their credentials, they could get their stuff published the normal way. They choose kickstarter to increase their profit, not because they need it to get published.
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I'm mostly into KS for books and board games. For books, I like to support the authors and have access to a book that will most likely be printed only once and rare. As for the board games, I love miniatures, and I am getting into the painting hobby. I spent a lot on Warhammer miniatures, and I usually get comparable quality miniatures from KS board games. So, I can't lose (if the game does get printed and shipped). I assume that the game will be in a genre I enjoy and have mechanics that I also like to play unless they change it during the process of making it.

I am currently backing 1 book about Norse Mythology, 1 electronic Lego kit, and 2 board games (plus 1 tank card game). The board games attracted me by the theme and the minis. If I don't care for the games, I still get a few hours of joy by painting the minis, which I most likely would never have a chance to get otherwise.
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As others have mentioned, it is a reality that some games wouldn't have ever made it to market without Kickstarter. Some companies might not even exist. There are a few great games, some really good ones, and there's also a lot of crap. There are some companies that abuse Kickstarter as a marketing platform.

I've backed quite a few games in the past year and half, but I'm going to be taking a break from it (mostly) this year. I'll be backing less games this year, but I'll also be purchasing less games as well.

Whether I'm backing a Kickstarter or purchasing a game, the most important question I ask myself is, "What is the chance this game is going to hit my table?"

In regards to Kickstarter I consider the following, in no particular order:
1) Publisher w/track record
2) Designer
3) Artwork
4) Rulebook
5) Does it appeal to me and/or people I game with

Rarely, have the extras really made a difference. Of the ones that have been delivered, I've had only one regret. Below, I'll list some games that I've Kickstarted and will lend some thoughts on them. Hopefully this adds some insight.

World's Fair 1893 - This was the first game that I Kickstarted. The creator at the time didn't have that many games under his belt. The theme intrigued me and the gameplay looked really engaging. For $29, it sounded like a deal, and it was. This game is very solid. When people tell me they have played Catan and Ticket to Ride, this is the game that I bring out and it never disappoints. In hindsight, the information provided on Kickstarter drew me in. If this was a game that I saw sitting on the shelf at a FLGS, I probably would have passed not knowing that much about it. After I backed this game and before it was delivered, I also purchased another game from the same publisher, Lanterns: The Harvest Festival, which made me more excited to get World's Fair. No regrets here. If you want some more info on this game, check out the designer's diary - https://boardgamegeek.com/blogpost/54497/designer-diary-worl....

The Manhattan Project: Chain Reaction - This is one of the few games where I feel I really got a benefit from the Kickstarter. I picked up the deluxe copy which was a bigger box providing room for sleeved cards as well as wooden bits for cake and uranium. The deluxe copy is not sold at retail. The retail copy is a tuck box with no wooden bits and it just looks cheesy sitting on the shelf at the FLGS. This is by no means a great game, but it's really fun to play to see what combinations players can chain together in one turn.

Strife: Shadows and Steam - From a small publisher and most likely would never be published without Kickstarter. It's a solid game and a real brain burner. This is the game you will never see go to retail. Nor is it a game that will ever see another print run. Which is sad because it's a really solid game. Personally, I prefer this to Onitama as a perfect information game, but it's hard to get others to play it because it takes so much mental energy for those who are not familiar with the cards. Those who have played the game and are familiar with it will always have a clear advantage.

Twist of Fate - This is my one regret. I backed it because it had an interesting mechanic. When it hit the table, it just fell flat. I should give it a second chance.

Villages of Valeria - I wasn't familiar with San Juan nor 51st State when I backed this. It's another one where the rules and artwork were engaging. I've only played it once and I liked it. I also later picked up Valeria Card Kingdoms and Quests of Valeria.

Quests of Valeria - This one came in the mail last week and I have yet to play it. I do believe it's going to be my favorite out of the Valeria line of games. I really shouldn't have Kickstarted this one. It didn't include any extras and I could have picked it up cheaper then what I Kickstarted it for.

Rocky Road à la Mode - Should be arriving shortly, but another game that I could pick up for a cheaper price than what I Kickstarted it for.

Dale of Merchants/Dale of Merchants 2 - If it wasn't for Kickstarter, I never would have discovered this game. From a small publisher. I backed Dale of Merchants 2 and included Dale of Merchants with my pledge. The cool thing here is that the publisher didn't wait to send both games together, Dale of Merchants was shipped shortly after the Kickstarter ended.

Coup - Specifically the Brazil Art edition (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/2012515236/coup-brazili...). This won't hit FLGS shelves in the US. It can be purchased directly from Indie Boards and Cards through amazon. The sci-fi setting never appealed to me, but being the head of an Italian family does. And, the artwork is amazing.

Mythic Battles: Pantheon - I have never played a miniatures game. This is also the most I have ever spent on a game. I love Greek Mythology and the card driven play of this game makes it look great. With all the Kickstarter content, it felt like it was too good to pass up. Won't be delivered until December 2017.

Your mileage may vary and the best advice I can give is to use your best judgement.

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Kickstarter brought me to board gaming, and I Kickstart quite a bit. (Probably too much.) Here's why I Kickstart games:

N Input into development and conversation with designers. Some projects are fully planned and just need capital to print, but I've seen designers make changes to projects due to backer feedback even in those cases. Backers sometimes get to vote on particular game features (usually art). They also often get first access to PnP files or play testing opportunities. Arguments in the Kickstarter comments can lead to game improvements. It's fun to have that back and forth and get that kind of input.

N On larger games, backers become the first experts and form a community for the appreciation of the game. They then migrate out from the Kickstarter into other communities such as BGG. I've seen this happen on KD:M, Gloomhaven (which I did not back), and Too Many Bones.

N All in pledges. God help me, I am as much a collector as a gamer. I want all the things. I fight this tendency if I'm buying afterward, but if I'm backing a game from the get-go, it's nice to be able to get the exclusives.

N Out of print games. Many small publishers throw in copies of their previous offerings, so Kickstarter becomes a good way to get that OOP gem you've been looking for. Reprints on KS are also great, because you get the game that much faster.

N Deals on the good stuff. Yes, most base games will be available cheaper later if they go to retail and go on sale, but not every game does that. The only way to get, as a for instance, anything from Chip Theory Games is direct from their webstore, and retail is retail. Their Kickstarter prices are always going to be the best deal. There are several small publishers that are like that.

N First come, first serve. When the game ships, backers will get their stuff first. If there are shortages at retail, backers typically don't have to worry about that. (See Gloomhaven.)

There are some downsides:

S The uncertainty. You need to do your research on Kickstarter. I've only been burned once on a significant purchase. (It wasn't a game.) I lean heavily toward people who've successfully delivered before. Look at people's past projects. Read the comments. Find out if they took care of complaints well. (There are always complaints.) Find out what the snags were and how they handled them. (There are always snags.) Go read negative reviews of past deliveries outside Kickstarter. (Amazon and BGG are great for this.) To the best of your ability, learn who you are giving your money to, because there is no store for you to get a refund from. If they don't deliver your game, in most cases your money will be gone.

S The wait. Oh, man, the wait! You pays your money, and you waits your time! It's fun to see updates as things develop. But for a big project, you are going to be on pins and needles for a good long while, wanting that game. (Some people feel you could spend your money elsewhere and be playing a game instead of waiting. I tend to want that specific game that I backed for, but if you'd be just as happy with something else, probably get something else and don't back on KS.)

S The whining. Your fellow backers will whine when things aren't going their way. (Some people have really unreasonable expectations of the delivery process.) Other people will seek you out to whine about the game, about Kickstarter, about every kind of thing. Sometimes creators start whining, and that's the worst. Overall, it's worth it, but patience with human beings is your first and best asset when dealing with Kickstarter (as with most other things).

TrustyMutsi wrote:
Are there some good Kickstarter games that have only been available through Kickstarter, and never went to retail?


A better question is if there are great games that never would have existed at all without Kickstarter. (There definitely are.) But as to your actual question, more often it's that there are great games that are only available in very limited channels or limited quantities.
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I personally never support BG Kickstarters. As said above, the best games will see a wider release and you'll have a chance to try it and read proper reviews from trusted sources. Santorini and Scythe are great examples of this.

If I went to GenCon and they said "This game doesn't come out for 4 months and you can buy it here for $80... but no we don't have a demo copy and you can't try it and there are no reviews but here is the box art." Many people wouldn't bite until they have more info. I view Kickstarter the same way. I CAN wait for a game. Heck there are games released a few years ago that I'm just now getting around to playing and enjoying. Also, the draw for many KS games are the extra bits. It's not going to kill me not to have the extra goodies and in many cases you can find someone willing to sell the extras anyway if I love that game enough after release. Even then, sometimes the extra bits are included in the retail version anyway!
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Obviously this isn't an absolute answer. But there's been a few different types of Kickstarter that I've backed.

1. The only benefit of backing the Kickstarter is to get it straight away and not have to wait for it to go retail. It might even cost a little more than at retail. I don't back these anymore, but have once or twice in the past.

2. The game is actually not backing very fast and might not exist at all if I and other backers don't pledge. I have only backed one of these The Pioneers Program and we'll see how that works out for me soon enough.

3. There's no extras at all. But it's envisaged to be a large saving compared to retail to back. I've backed a few like this. It's mostly worked out, but in my early days when I wasn't such a good judge, games have ended up reduced to be cheaper than I paid (but I've usually moved the game on before then!). Gloomhaven is a perfect example of this (which I unfortunately didn't back ).

4. The Kickstarter version gives you loads of extra content that you can't get elsewhere. You aren't likely to make a saving this way (although if you get EVERYTHING it might work out cheaper than buying each bit separately later), but you will end up with stuff others can't buy. So if you do end up moving it on and it's popular you might even make a profit (think anything Cool Mini Or Not).

5. The kickstarter gives you nice extras that won't add content to the game, but will improve it functionally or aesthetically. I've backed these on occasion. Sometimes you can get these extra bits later at an increased cost (anything Stonemaier Games).

I might be forgetting something, but there's only one campaign I've backed (The 7th Continent) which not only has exclusive content, but also hasn't yet sorted any kind of retail plan, so it might not be available for a very long time. So I'm glad I backed it, but this is unusual. Gloomhaven has been kind of like this, in that it's post campaign popularity was so high that all retail prints went so fast that it looks like the only way they'll release more is with another Kickstarter (which is what I think might happen with 7th Continent). I feel it's VERY unlikely to pay off if you treat every campaign like these 2 in fear of missing out.
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Herndon
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Pros for me that vary from other comments:

1) Discounts. Many games come at 10-25% discount, plus a bunch seem to offer free shipping. Not only are they discounted lower than retail, they typically include more components. You get a little pep in your step when you see the same game at the retail store for $30 more than you paid, plus you know you may have helped shape the rules or contents.
2) Upgraded components. Most retail games come with your typical cardboard everything. With Kickstarter, you might receive plastic miniatures, wooden pieces or metal coins.
3) Exclusives. Now, many games are starting to pull away from Kickstarter exclusives, but I feel a little entitled after having shelled out a year earlier than everyone for an unknown potential success.
4) Narcissism. Rare and expensive, but you can actually get your name or likeness into a game for you or a loved one. For example, my wife is now a zombie in an undisclosed Kickstarter game. I enjoy killing her when we play. devil
5) Random Christmas present. Well, well, well. I wonder what just showed up at my front door by UPS today. I'm so excited. I can't wait to rip it open to find out what I ordered eight months ago. Woo-hoo! Jackpot! My gaming group is going to love this.

Cons that I don't recall being mentioned:

1) Games arrive damaged or missing components. Now, this technically could happen with retail, but seems to happen more often with Kickstarter. Most vendors are willing to back up their games with replacements, so not a huge deal. However, the dent in the corner that makes you cringe doesn't get deemed worthy for a replacement.
2) No discounts. Unlike my Pro: Discounts above, sometimes I feel rather ripped off when I hear that I spent $100+ for a game (*ahem* Ghostbusters *ahem*) only to find it on sale online for $25-$35 BEFORE I have even received it in the mail. Like everything, this is a rarity, but now I am "stuck" with an extra copy due to my foolish speculating. Granted, I have additional components not found in retail, but I don't believe I have $70 worth of additional components.
3) Soul sucking. CMON makes some great games, but it is easy to fall for the hype and throw $100+ at a game just because their name is on it and everyone else is doing it. Same might go for any other game like Dark Souls, Exploding Kittens and such. You get a certain rush when you get an Early Bird, cool minis or whatever compels you to visit Kickstarter's site everyday to see what is happening.
4) Shelf filler. Some games tend to flop once you've actually played them. Just make sure you're picking a game that you will enjoy playing. Otherwise, some of those pledges will just sit on your bookshelf taking up space (probably unopened) years later. However, this can happen with retail copies just as easily.

Enjoy!
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Harold Jennett
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Could you guys offer some current examples of "SUPER PROMISING" or "RUN AWAY" board games on Kickstarter?
 
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