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Subject: what to do with hands where I have 2 or more of opp event cards rss

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Jonathan F
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This happened in my last game 2 different years. They were great event cards for my opponent so I didn't want to discard event for my impulse which is a minimal gain of 1 PC action or discard PC marker (which my opponent always seems to follow up with a simple PC play of his own to get the spot right back and then some) but also allow my opponent to swap his Op card for that event card. I couldn't just wait till the end of the year either because I had 2 of these. The only safe way to get rid of them is in battle but then you hamstring yourself by having 1 less impulse and if you are going first as the British for instance that means letting americans have 2 free card plays at the end that you can't respond to instead of the usual 1.

Seems like there could have been a better way to make dead cards not so punishing...such as:
1. play as a combat card for the measly +1 DRM but get to draw a new one when impulse is over.
2. reverse pick up rule. now if you discard the event as your impulse your opponent can't pick it up with an ops trade. At the same time, then you could sweeten the deal and make it +2 DRM for playing event card for combat purpose since it would now be vulnerable to pick up that way.
 
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Dave Rubin
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"It may be doubted whether so small a number of men ever employed so short a space of time with greater or more lasting effects upon the history of the world.” — Sir George Otto Trevelyan on the Battles of Trenton and Princeton
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Sometimes, you have to pick your poison. That's a feature, not a bug.
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Mark Herman
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umrmeche wrote:
This happened in my last game 2 different years. They were great event cards for my opponent so I didn't want to discard event for my impulse which is a minimal gain of 1 PC action or discard PC marker (which my opponent always seems to follow up with a simple PC play of his own to get the spot right back and then some) but also allow my opponent to swap his Op card for that event card. I couldn't just wait till the end of the year either because I had 2 of these. The only safe way to get rid of them is in battle but then you hamstring yourself by having 1 less impulse and if you are going first as the British for instance that means letting americans have 2 free card plays at the end that you can't respond to instead of the usual 1.

Seems like there could have been a better way to make dead cards not so punishing...such as:
1. play as a combat card for the measly +1 DRM but get to draw a new one when impulse is over.
2. reverse pick up rule. now if you discard the event as your impulse your opponent can't pick it up with an ops trade. At the same time, then you could sweeten the deal and make it +2 DRM for playing event card for combat purpose since it would now be vulnerable to pick up that way.


As David said, this was intentional. You can often slow or in some cases prevent some events, but you cannot stop all of them. In some cases you have to use the card for the 1PC play and make your opponent dump an OC card and whatever opportunity cost that represents to pick up the card.

Luck of the draw as they say, but as the deck is 60% ops cards with approximately half of the remaining 40% your cards, you should experience this situation every other turn or so and that is what I was going for.

Regards,

Mark
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Jonathan F
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MarkHerman wrote:
umrmeche wrote:
This happened in my last game 2 different years. They were great event cards for my opponent so I didn't want to discard event for my impulse which is a minimal gain of 1 PC action or discard PC marker (which my opponent always seems to follow up with a simple PC play of his own to get the spot right back and then some) but also allow my opponent to swap his Op card for that event card. I couldn't just wait till the end of the year either because I had 2 of these. The only safe way to get rid of them is in battle but then you hamstring yourself by having 1 less impulse and if you are going first as the British for instance that means letting americans have 2 free card plays at the end that you can't respond to instead of the usual 1.

Seems like there could have been a better way to make dead cards not so punishing...such as:
1. play as a combat card for the measly +1 DRM but get to draw a new one when impulse is over.
2. reverse pick up rule. now if you discard the event as your impulse your opponent can't pick it up with an ops trade. At the same time, then you could sweeten the deal and make it +2 DRM for playing event card for combat purpose since it would now be vulnerable to pick up that way.


As David said, this was intentional. You can often slow or in some cases prevent some events, but you cannot stop all of them. In some cases you have to use the card for the 1PC play and make your opponent dump an OC card and whatever opportunity cost that represents to pick up the card.

Luck of the draw as they say, but as the deck is 60% ops cards with approximately half of the remaining 40% your cards, you should experience this situation every other turn or so and that is what I was going for.

Regards,

Mark

Thank you for taking time to respond. I guess this is the catch 22 for me with games with cards. I love the mechanic and prefer it for most my war games now but I hate when either I or my opponent get dealt crappy hands way more than the other. It is so frustrating and out of your control when it happens to you and victories feel cheap when they happen to the opponent. Some mitigating mechanisms are nice but I think if there was no luck or randomness in bad card draws it wouldn't simulate the fact that there is fog of war and no battle plan survives contact with the enemy. I guess as a designer all you can do is strive for the best possible balance between allowing for luck so that everything isn't deterministic and too mechanical but also reward skillful planning and anticipation.

One last question on design that is off topic but for this game...why did you cap commander battle rating by CU qty? It is my experience in reading history that throughout time, a hallmark of great leaders is that they can do more with less and defeat much larger foes. In this game, if you have a small force of 2 CU's or less for instance then guys like Cornwallis, Howe and Washington or Greene are pretty much indistinguishable from each other due to being capped from reaching beyond their lowest rating? Did you do this becuase it would have made good generals too powerful if a guy like Washington could get say up to double his CU's in combat rating for a battle?
 
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Brian Sinclair
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Last week I played as the British and in one hand I had 5 American event cards. Consider 2 a blessing. To put a positive spin on this is that I can control what my opponent can do and when. Also, these events will not likely come up again. At the time I was not looking at the positive only the negative but I didn't lead on to my opponent and I think I escaped reasonably well. So keep your whits and work through the cards. Have fun.
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Brian
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Brian Sinclair wrote:
Last week I played as the British and in one hand I had 5 American event cards.
Considering the probabilities (12 flagged event cards per side plus multiple one off events out of 110 cards) pulling 5 enemy events in one turn is unlikely to repeat itself.

Even so, your opponent may not be able to take full advantage of the discarded events anyway (too few Ops cards in hand).
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Alex N
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umrmeche wrote:


One last question on design that is off topic but for this game...why did you cap commander battle rating by CU qty? It is my experience in reading history that throughout time, a hallmark of great leaders is that they can do more with less and defeat much larger foes. In this game, if you have a small force of 2 CU's or less for instance then guys like Cornwallis, Howe and Washington or Greene are pretty much indistinguishable from each other due to being capped from reaching beyond their lowest rating? Did you do this becuase it would have made good generals too powerful if a guy like Washington could get say up to double his CU's in combat rating for a battle?


I'll take a stab at this given that I'm currently studying the Revolutionary War at Rutgers as part of my Masters program.

The fact that some generals could do more with less I feel is already reflected in their strategy rating. The best generals, Washington, Greene, and Arnold are all assigned "1" and therefore can move and command their troops more frequently than the notoriously cautious generals like Howe (strategy rating "3"), who lost his chance in obliterating Washington in the NY/NJ campaign of 1776 by giving up the chase in favor of untimely tea breaks to Clinton (also a "3") who was more concerned about protecting his own NYC garrison of 20,000 troops instead of helping Cornwallis at Yorktown until it was too late.


Now as to why the designer chose to limit the battle rating to the number of CUs makes perfect sense to me when you consider the serious attrition that Washington suffered every year when enlistees were free to go when their short term was up. Imagine how this loss of troops severely handicapped the greatest of generals in terms of tactical flexibility and troop morale. The same could be said of generals who lost combat units in defeats. Such losses seriously "impaired" generals on both sides of the conflict and thus is properly reflected when they continue to engage in battle. The best thing to do in that case, especially, if you are the Americans is to retreat and quickly replenish with fresh troops so you can fight another day.
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