Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
32 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: Board Game Weekend rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Tom Shriver
United States
Indianapolis
IN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
My partner and I play board games all the time, but 2-3 times a year we'll host a board game weekend. We have friends come from all over to play games. I know most people here do the same. We typically run 10-15 individuals at any given time.

We usually get in a few of the smaller player count/longer time games such as Terra Mystica or Blood Rage, but since we have so many people we always gravitate towards group/party games (Spyfall, Mysterium, Codenames, Two Rooms, etc.). We want to get more intentional about setting up more tables with more options this year.

We typically try to wing it, but there are certain people in our group who come that others don't like to play with. We also have a few people that everyone wants to play with.

I guess my question is - how do you handle this for your board game weekends/nights? How do you properly balance tables with skill/will while making sure that some people don't get "stuck" with the bad players. I was thinking of having people sign up via a Google doc or something but I want to find some way to distribute people evenly...if that makes sense! I'm open to suggestions to help us play some deeper games instead of gravitating towards party games for ease. Thanks!

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Florence
MA
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tofuburrito wrote:
there are certain people in our group who come that others don't like to play with.
tofuburrito wrote:
I guess my question is - how do you handle this for your board game weekends/nights?
Don't invite those people.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Shriver
United States
Indianapolis
IN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Quote:
Don't invite those people.


I see where you're coming from. It seems like the easy thing to do, but it's more than a board game weekend with our group. That's what brings us together, but we're all really good friends and have been since high school. There are a couple of them who don't play well so it's tough to play with them, but they love gaming.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete Martyn
United States
Guilford
VT
flag msg tools
EXCELSIOR!!!
badge
ZOMGALOMES!!!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
As an annual game weekend host (we're up to about thirty people over 48 hours) I'm not sure I have much advice other than encouraging people to take responsibility for their own gaming decisions. Usually our gatherings will start with some party games with the first arrivals, but once eight-plus people have arrived it gets tougher to maintain that. That's when you, the host, need to make things happen.

My advice? Take the lead in breaking off into smaller groups. Suggest a game and make it happen. Say, "I'd love to play a game of [x], and I can take up to four other players." Once you get those four, great! Go off and play! Hopefully some other folks will step up and follow your example. That doesn't address the issue of people not wanting to play games with certain others, but honestly if those people are going to be a part of the gathering I don't see too much of a way around that. You either disinvite them or people suck it up for an hour or two.

Might be worth making a plan with one or two of your friends in advance to take the role of game-starter. Each of you can pitch a game and people can sort themselves accordingly. If they don't like what's on offer, they're welcome to offer suggestions or try to recruit their own players.

It can also be helpful if you have a general sense of how long various games will run. In our group, people tend to try to pay attention to when other games are likely to finish up. If your game has just finished, and it looks like another game will be wrapping up soon, that's a great time to break out a filler (or eat some food, refresh drinks, etc.) so that players can reconvene and switch groups for the next go-round.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George Louie
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
tofuburrito wrote:
Quote:
Don't invite those people.


I see where you're coming from. It seems like the easy thing to do, but it's more than a board game weekend with our group. That's what brings us together, but we're all really good friends and have been since high school. There are a couple of them who don't play well so it's tough to play with them, but they love gaming.



If its about being with your friends, then it doesn't really matter how good or bad they are at gaming.. actually, I would go as far as to say it NEVER matters how good or bad the other people are at playing.. each player should just play to the best of their ability and enjoy that for what it is because in the end that's all you can control. if you get so wrapped up in making sure everyone is competitive with each other, or who is winning or losing, you won't be able to enjoy any games at all. As long as people are respectful to each other, it should be fun.

I think the key for a group of that size to make sure there are enough experienced players who can teach the games, and then let people just play whatever games they want. if someone wants to play a specific game, they should at least be interested enough to organize the table for it, even if they don't know how to teach it..


1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete Martyn
United States
Guilford
VT
flag msg tools
EXCELSIOR!!!
badge
ZOMGALOMES!!!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Are the "bad players" bad because they're not experienced gamers, or because they're unpleasant to play with? I assumed the latter but now I'm rethinking that.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George Louie
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
the pete wrote:
Are the "bad players" bad because they're not experienced gamers, or because they're unpleasant to play with? I assumed the latter but now I'm rethinking that.


Based on the quote below, I think its the former.


tofuburrito wrote:
That's what brings us together, but we're all really good friends and have been since high school. There are a couple of them who don't play well so it's tough to play with them, but they love gaming.


 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brennan Sheremeto
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
glouie wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
Quote:
Don't invite those people.


I see where you're coming from. It seems like the easy thing to do, but it's more than a board game weekend with our group. That's what brings us together, but we're all really good friends and have been since high school. There are a couple of them who don't play well so it's tough to play with them, but they love gaming.



If its about being with your friends, then it doesn't really matter how good or bad they are at gaming.. actually, I would go as far as to say it NEVER matters how good or bad the other people are at playing.. each player should just play to the best of their ability and enjoy that for what it is because in the end that's all you can control. if you get so wrapped up in making sure everyone is competitive with each other, or who is winning or losing, you won't be able to enjoy any games at all. As long as people are respectful to each other, it should be fun.

I think the key for a group of that size to make sure there are enough experienced players who can teach the games, and then let people just play whatever games they want. if someone wants to play a specific game, they should at least be interested enough to organize the table for it, even if they don't know how to teach it..




I assume that "bad" means super AP or can't remember rules so they ask the same thing/do the same thing 20 times a game, ect. And I can see the frustration there.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Trevor Taylor
United Kingdom
FARINGDON
Oxfordshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I would suggest not scheduling everything, as it will likely not work (games over-running and people waiting on a player to start there game etc...).
I would schedule the long games only (and perhaps one or 2 party games involving many players), with people signing up for those in advance with start times and plenty of space in-between them. Then people can happily play shorter games with any group but know that when the time comes they need to be ready to play the 'big' games. If demand dictates, you could have the same game run at different time, with a priority for those who aren't already signed up for it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Shriver
United States
Indianapolis
IN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
the pete wrote:
Are the "bad players" bad because they're not experienced gamers, or because they're unpleasant to play with? I assumed the latter but now I'm rethinking that.


It's a little bit of both. We have two guys (brothers) who love coming to hang out with everyone. They play because that's what we all love to do and they want to be in community with us, but they just don't care much. Of course we want to include them and have fun with them, but they aren't as competitive as the rest of us and one of them has a difficult time remembering rules. He often (accidently) throws the game in favor of one player or another. We've tried to keep him on some of the easier games and have a fun time doing the big games with him, but he always volunteers for more complex games, too. Last gaming weekend we politely said, "This game is pretty difficult and has a lot of rules - are you sure you want to play?" He was offended and said he could handle it, but about an hour in he was proving us right.

This time we may just have to say, "Dude, we love you, but you can't handle this type of game. We've tried it before and you always lose interest and have a hard time understanding the strategy. You're welcome to sit around the table with us, but we've got some other people who are going to play this one." It just feels so mean! Haha
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Florence
MA
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tofuburrito wrote:
the pete wrote:
Are the "bad players" bad because they're not experienced gamers, or because they're unpleasant to play with? I assumed the latter but now I'm rethinking that.


It's a little bit of both. We have two guys (brothers) who love coming to hang out with everyone. They play because that's what we all love to do and they want to be in community with us, but they just don't care much. Of course we want to include them and have fun with them, but they aren't as competitive as the rest of us and one of them has a difficult time remembering rules. He often (accidently) throws the game in favor of one player or another. We've tried to keep him on some of the easier games and have a fun time doing the big games with him, but he always volunteers for more complex games, too.
Yeah... the "we want to include them" part of this doesn't make sense to me. If you're playing games, then invite people who enjoy games and make gaming fun. If the goal is just to hang out with friends from high school, then do something else with the group. Don't try to mix non-gamers/bad gamers into a game group. It'll just end up causing more problems than it is worth.

tofuburrito wrote:
This time we may just have to say, "Dude, we love you, but you can't handle this type of game. We've tried it before and you always lose interest and have a hard time understanding the strategy. You're welcome to sit around the table with us, but we've got some other people who are going to play this one." It just feels so mean! Haha
It does seem mean to invite someone to an event that you don't really want them to participate at.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Shriver
United States
Indianapolis
IN
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thunkd wrote:
Yeah... the "we want to include them" part of this doesn't make sense to me. If you're playing games, then invite people who enjoy games and make gaming fun. If the goal is just to hang out with friends from high school, then do something else with the group. Don't try to mix non-gamers/bad gamers into a game group. It'll just end up causing more problems than it is worth.


I have to disagree with you here. We've got a group of about 15 friends. 13 love board games. 2 don't. About half of us are local and the other half are driving 3-6 hours to make for Board Game Weekend. We don't get to see each other often. The vast majority of the group wants to play board games. Two of them don't, but they realize that the majority does. We do other things, too. We'll hit the bar, see a movie, play some video games, etc...but the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George Louie
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the pete wrote:
Are the "bad players" bad because they're not experienced gamers, or because they're unpleasant to play with? I assumed the latter but now I'm rethinking that.


It's a little bit of both. We have two guys (brothers) who love coming to hang out with everyone. They play because that's what we all love to do and they want to be in community with us, but they just don't care much. Of course we want to include them and have fun with them, but they aren't as competitive as the rest of us and one of them has a difficult time remembering rules. He often (accidently) throws the game in favor of one player or another. We've tried to keep him on some of the easier games and have a fun time doing the big games with him, but he always volunteers for more complex games, too.
Yeah... the "we want to include them" part of this doesn't make sense to me. If you're playing games, then invite people who enjoy games and make gaming fun. If the goal is just to hang out with friends from high school, then do something else with the group. Don't try to mix non-gamers/bad gamers into a game group. It'll just end up causing more problems than it is worth.

tofuburrito wrote:
This time we may just have to say, "Dude, we love you, but you can't handle this type of game. We've tried it before and you always lose interest and have a hard time understanding the strategy. You're welcome to sit around the table with us, but we've got some other people who are going to play this one." It just feels so mean! Haha
It does seem mean to invite someone to an event that you don't really want them to participate at.


I think you let them play, but during the gameplay, you point out to them how their sub-par play or nonchalance is ruining the game for others.. I would do it in an easy, non-confrontational way.. if they make a move that is obviously going to skew the game and benefit a particular player over everyone else, point it out.. If they're your friends, they'll understand that its affecting gameplay and the enjoyment of others.. and maybe they'll volunteer to sit out next time.



 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Florence
MA
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tofuburrito wrote:
the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
So putting myself in their shoes, let's recast the event as something I don't do... like golf. If I knew that the majority of the weekend was going to be golfing and that other players would be annoyed at my golf ineptitude then I don't think I'd particularly enjoy the event.

Either I'd be hanging around chit-chatting and not playing golf while everyone else was playing, which doesn't seem fun, or I'd be playing poorly and annoying everyone else. So I'd prefer either not to come, or to come and do the other activities but to do my own thing when it came time to golf.

4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brennan Sheremeto
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
So putting myself in their shoes, let's recast the event as something I don't do... like golf. If I knew that the majority of the weekend was going to be golfing and that other players would be annoyed at my golf ineptitude then I don't think I'd particularly enjoy the event.

Either I'd be hanging around chit-chatting and not playing golf while everyone else was playing, which doesn't seem fun, or I'd be playing poorly and annoying everyone else. So I'd prefer either not to come, or to come and do the other activities but to do my own thing when it came time to golf.



Ah that doesn't work. in your scenario you would also be very confident that you can play golf just as good as everyone else.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George Louie
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
amish_rabbi wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
So putting myself in their shoes, let's recast the event as something I don't do... like golf. If I knew that the majority of the weekend was going to be golfing and that other players would be annoyed at my golf ineptitude then I don't think I'd particularly enjoy the event.

Either I'd be hanging around chit-chatting and not playing golf while everyone else was playing, which doesn't seem fun, or I'd be playing poorly and annoying everyone else. So I'd prefer either not to come, or to come and do the other activities but to do my own thing when it came time to golf.



Ah that doesn't work. in your scenario you would also be very confident that you can play golf just as good as everyone else.


Not true at all.. see below quote.. I think a reasonable person who knows they "don't care much" about gaming, would know that they weren't as good as other who do care and are really into it.


tofuburrito wrote:


It's a little bit of both. We have two guys (brothers) who love coming to hang out with everyone. They play because that's what we all love to do and they want to be in community with us, but they just don't care much.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tofuburrito wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
Yeah... the "we want to include them" part of this doesn't make sense to me. If you're playing games, then invite people who enjoy games and make gaming fun. If the goal is just to hang out with friends from high school, then do something else with the group. Don't try to mix non-gamers/bad gamers into a game group. It'll just end up causing more problems than it is worth.


I have to disagree with you here. We've got a group of about 15 friends. 13 love board games. 2 don't. About half of us are local and the other half are driving 3-6 hours to make for Board Game Weekend. We don't get to see each other often. The vast majority of the group wants to play board games. Two of them don't, but they realize that the majority does. We do other things, too. We'll hit the bar, see a movie, play some video games, etc...but the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?


Well then, problem solved, invite them and have fun!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George Louie
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
glouie wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the pete wrote:
Are the "bad players" bad because they're not experienced gamers, or because they're unpleasant to play with? I assumed the latter but now I'm rethinking that.


It's a little bit of both. We have two guys (brothers) who love coming to hang out with everyone. They play because that's what we all love to do and they want to be in community with us, but they just don't care much. Of course we want to include them and have fun with them, but they aren't as competitive as the rest of us and one of them has a difficult time remembering rules. He often (accidently) throws the game in favor of one player or another. We've tried to keep him on some of the easier games and have a fun time doing the big games with him, but he always volunteers for more complex games, too.
Yeah... the "we want to include them" part of this doesn't make sense to me. If you're playing games, then invite people who enjoy games and make gaming fun. If the goal is just to hang out with friends from high school, then do something else with the group. Don't try to mix non-gamers/bad gamers into a game group. It'll just end up causing more problems than it is worth.

tofuburrito wrote:
This time we may just have to say, "Dude, we love you, but you can't handle this type of game. We've tried it before and you always lose interest and have a hard time understanding the strategy. You're welcome to sit around the table with us, but we've got some other people who are going to play this one." It just feels so mean! Haha
It does seem mean to invite someone to an event that you don't really want them to participate at.


I think you let them play, but during the gameplay, you point out to them how their sub-par play or nonchalance is ruining the game for others.. I would do it in an easy, non-confrontational way.. if they make a move that is obviously going to skew the game and benefit a particular player over everyone else, point it out.. If they're your friends, they'll understand that its affecting gameplay and the enjoyment of others.. and maybe they'll volunteer to sit out next time.



Just to add to my earlier post.. I think it would be acceptable to point out to them that they are ruining the experience (maybe not those exact words) for others by not taking the game seriously. As I said above, I think you point out the instances when they occur and give them the opportunity to correct their play (with suggested options). If your group is really as serious about this as you say, I would say that even the person who benefits the most from the poor play should point it out to them, and say something to the effect "I really don't want to win like that..." That might help emphasize that they nonchalant gaming attitude is negatively affecting gameplay..
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marina SC
Canada
Toronto
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
tofuburrito wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
Yeah... the "we want to include them" part of this doesn't make sense to me. If you're playing games, then invite people who enjoy games and make gaming fun. If the goal is just to hang out with friends from high school, then do something else with the group. Don't try to mix non-gamers/bad gamers into a game group. It'll just end up causing more problems than it is worth.


I have to disagree with you here. We've got a group of about 15 friends. 13 love board games. 2 don't. About half of us are local and the other half are driving 3-6 hours to make for Board Game Weekend. We don't get to see each other often. The vast majority of the group wants to play board games. Two of them don't, but they realize that the majority does. We do other things, too. We'll hit the bar, see a movie, play some video games, etc...but the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?

Why not play some big light games together, then when some heavier games come out, set up the videogames (or other activity) in the same room? Since they don't like BGs, they'll probably gravitate toward the alternative, and others might drop in/out between games. Yes, VGs might be slightly distracting, but if this is more of a hangout kind of thing I think everyone would enjoy being in the same location
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Thunkd
United States
Florence
MA
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
amish_rabbi wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
So putting myself in their shoes, let's recast the event as something I don't do... like golf. If I knew that the majority of the weekend was going to be golfing and that other players would be annoyed at my golf ineptitude then I don't think I'd particularly enjoy the event.

Either I'd be hanging around chit-chatting and not playing golf while everyone else was playing, which doesn't seem fun, or I'd be playing poorly and annoying everyone else. So I'd prefer either not to come, or to come and do the other activities but to do my own thing when it came time to golf.



Ah that doesn't work. in your scenario you would also be very confident that you can play golf just as good as everyone else.
And that's where "putting myself in their shoes" falls apart, because how well you perform in golf, and in games, is objectively measurable. Someone would have to be pretty dim to think they're good when they're not. And honestly... I wouldn't want to hang out with someone like that.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Shaun Morris
United States
New Jersey
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
So putting myself in their shoes, let's recast the event as something I don't do... like golf. If I knew that the majority of the weekend was going to be golfing and that other players would be annoyed at my golf ineptitude then I don't think I'd particularly enjoy the event.

Either I'd be hanging around chit-chatting and not playing golf while everyone else was playing, which doesn't seem fun, or I'd be playing poorly and annoying everyone else. So I'd prefer either not to come, or to come and do the other activities but to do my own thing when it came time to golf.



This analogy actually fits me pretty well. As such, I can use myself as an actual real life example.

I have a few friends that like to golf, and do so pretty regularly. They're actually pretty good at, nowhere near professional level but pretty decent. I on the other hand, like golf but I've never taken it seriously, nor am I competitive about it. I enjoy it but I know from the get-go that I'm going to have the worst score, so for me, when I go golfing it's more to socialize with my friends. My friends completely understand this, and while I don't get invited to go golfing with them much, when I do they play much less competitively because they know and accept I'm not going to put much effort into the game because I'm there to have fun and hang out with my friends, not to play golf. Golf is just incidental to my overall purpose of being there.

What does this have to do with anything? Well, in short, you and your friends need to understand the big picture, which is, board game weekend isn't done so that you can get together and play board games. It's done so you can all see each other, hang out, and have fun. The games are incidental to that purpose. The games are just something to do while you're hanging out and having fun. Your 2 non-gaming friends are accommodating the rest of the group by doing something that doesn't really interest them. The rest of the group should accommodate them by playing sociably rather than competitively during the games the 2 non-gamers are participating in.

You can play board games competitively with your regular groups. The 2-3 times a year your friends meet to catch up is not the time to play competitively. That's the time to play sociably. You can still play more involved games, but just understand, your non-gaming friends aren't going to play competitively and you're likely going to need to continue to coach them the entire game. Just accept it and enjoy the fact that you're getting to enjoy the company of a friend you haven't seen in a couple months.

EDIT: General grammar.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
mortego
United States
New Kensington
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If I was part of a group of friends in a situation like this but the hobby was watching professional sports (pick one) I would have the worst time.....and most likely poke fun at it relentlessly, I'd rather decline to go if I knew it'd be that way.

In the O.P.'s case, those "2" friends continue to show up so.......they must be having a good time.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George Louie
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Mashpotassium wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
Yeah... the "we want to include them" part of this doesn't make sense to me. If you're playing games, then invite people who enjoy games and make gaming fun. If the goal is just to hang out with friends from high school, then do something else with the group. Don't try to mix non-gamers/bad gamers into a game group. It'll just end up causing more problems than it is worth.


I have to disagree with you here. We've got a group of about 15 friends. 13 love board games. 2 don't. About half of us are local and the other half are driving 3-6 hours to make for Board Game Weekend. We don't get to see each other often. The vast majority of the group wants to play board games. Two of them don't, but they realize that the majority does. We do other things, too. We'll hit the bar, see a movie, play some video games, etc...but the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?

Why not play some big light games together, then when some heavier games come out, set up the videogames (or other activity) in the same room? Since they don't like BGs, they'll probably gravitate toward the alternative, and others might drop in/out between games. Yes, VGs might be slightly distracting, but if this is more of a hangout kind of thing I think everyone would enjoy being in the same location


A TV set, food and drinks on the table and a sofa and some chairs in the same room as the board gaming go a long way towards keeping people engaged as part of the group, and can give the opportunity to chat, laugh and be part of the community, while not actively participating in the games. I love to play games, but I also have no problem just sitting and talking with friends while others play...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brennan Sheremeto
Canada
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
glouie wrote:
amish_rabbi wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
So putting myself in their shoes, let's recast the event as something I don't do... like golf. If I knew that the majority of the weekend was going to be golfing and that other players would be annoyed at my golf ineptitude then I don't think I'd particularly enjoy the event.

Either I'd be hanging around chit-chatting and not playing golf while everyone else was playing, which doesn't seem fun, or I'd be playing poorly and annoying everyone else. So I'd prefer either not to come, or to come and do the other activities but to do my own thing when it came time to golf.



Ah that doesn't work. in your scenario you would also be very confident that you can play golf just as good as everyone else.


Not true at all.. see below quote.. I think a reasonable person who knows they "don't care much" about gaming, would know that they weren't as good as other who do care and are really into it.


tofuburrito wrote:


It's a little bit of both. We have two guys (brothers) who love coming to hang out with everyone. They play because that's what we all love to do and they want to be in community with us, but they just don't care much.


If you keep reading that post, it says this.

Quote:
Last gaming weekend we politely said, "This game is pretty difficult and has a lot of rules - are you sure you want to play?" He was offended and said he could handle it, but about an hour in he was proving us right.


Which is the same as thinking you are actually good at golf when you aren't
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
George Louie
United States
Alexandria
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
amish_rabbi wrote:
glouie wrote:
amish_rabbi wrote:
Thunkd wrote:
tofuburrito wrote:
the majority of the weekend is definitely board games. They don't love it, but they come anyway. Imagine if you were them. Would you rather be told not to play a game or just not be invited to hang out with some of your oldest friends?
So putting myself in their shoes, let's recast the event as something I don't do... like golf. If I knew that the majority of the weekend was going to be golfing and that other players would be annoyed at my golf ineptitude then I don't think I'd particularly enjoy the event.

Either I'd be hanging around chit-chatting and not playing golf while everyone else was playing, which doesn't seem fun, or I'd be playing poorly and annoying everyone else. So I'd prefer either not to come, or to come and do the other activities but to do my own thing when it came time to golf.



Ah that doesn't work. in your scenario you would also be very confident that you can play golf just as good as everyone else.


Not true at all.. see below quote.. I think a reasonable person who knows they "don't care much" about gaming, would know that they weren't as good as other who do care and are really into it.


tofuburrito wrote:


It's a little bit of both. We have two guys (brothers) who love coming to hang out with everyone. They play because that's what we all love to do and they want to be in community with us, but they just don't care much.


If you keep reading that post, it says this.

Quote:
Last gaming weekend we politely said, "This game is pretty difficult and has a lot of rules - are you sure you want to play?" He was offended and said he could handle it, but about an hour in he was proving us right.


Which is the same as thinking you are actually good at golf when you aren't


No its not.. I know I can handle the rules of golf, that doesn't make me think I'm as good at it as my friends who are really into it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.