Petrarch The Latin
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My friend and I just completed case 5, we have never played any other cases from this or the original SH:CD. It was enjoyable, but as the big reveal clues came into focus we just collectively rolled our eyes.
Spoiler (click to reveal)

I mean, come on, what a cliche "the evil twin brother did it!" Even in the BBC Sherlock show Sherlock mocks these plot twist twin story lines.


Do the other cases similarly veer into such trite territory, or are more believable and human cases to be found? Again, it was fun, but I guess I was hoping for something that assumed the reader had read a mystery story before.
 
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Dave Neale
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There is a lot of variety in the cases. I would say, on the whole, they veer towards realism more than cliche or extreme solutions. I remember some cases from the original base game feeling highly realistic to me. I think the same is probably true of West End Adventures, though I can't recall enough details to be sure. I'd suggest you just keep playing the next couple of cases at least, and I suspect you'll find the kind of experience you want.
 
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Jason Wileman
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I will say that case 5 did that to me as well. But I agree with whitescar, it's more an exception than the rule. It's a shame that so many people are starting with that case as their first entry into the series...I personally think case 5 is the weakest one in the series (of the ones I've played so far).

 
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Craig Groff-Folsom
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Agreed with those above. Cases 6 and 7 were better.
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Rob Wrigley
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To be fair, this game is based not on the current BBC tv series, but the original Arthur Conan Doyle stories. These works not only featured any number of borderline-abusurd solutions, but arguably invented the cliches you are objecting to.
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A. B. West
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Yeah, this violates straight up the Fair Play rules.
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Petrarch The Latin
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Glad to hear there is more variety in the cases. I'm looking forward to them, and thanks for the Fair Play rules A.B., never heard of them before.

Also, my bringing up the BBC show isn't meant to compare the game to it, just to highlight the universality of the trope in the modern era...an era the authors of the game-unlike Doyle-are clearly writing for.
 
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Ben O'Steen
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adamw wrote:
Yeah, this violates straight up the Fair Play rules.


Mythos Tales say "boooo!" to rule #2
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Jason Wileman
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adamw wrote:
Yeah, this violates straight up the Fair Play rules.


I know I'm a complete newb...but yeah, I agree with robwrigley. While I'm not a fan of this case's solution, Doyle didn't abide by most of those fair play rules. The Doyle books weren't designed to allow you to solve the crime - they were to be amused and excited by Holmes' antics. And, then, many times, to be just as shocked and surprised as Watson when the final truth was revealed. Doyle didn't write like Christie or the others, so it's hard to peg Holmes in the same genre in a lot of ways.

That's why SHCD is so fun - it really puts you in the frame of mind of one of the people in awe of Sherlock's powers, participating in the mystery along side him, not replacing him per se. Genius gameplay IMHO as a huge Holmes fan.
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leonardo balbi
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By the way . It's my first time playing SHCD . Case number number 5 instruct me to have only one newspaper.
The Case starts in September 12 . should I read the September 13 newspaper ( when Sherlock decides to begin his investigation)?
Thanks
Thanks
 
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A. B. West
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thecapn32 wrote:
I know I'm a complete newb...but yeah, I agree with robwrigley. While I'm not a fan of this case's solution, Doyle didn't abide by most of those fair play rules. The Doyle books weren't designed to allow you to solve the crime - they were to be amused and excited by Holmes' antics. And, then, many times, to be just as shocked and surprised as Watson when the final truth was revealed. Doyle didn't write like Christie or the others, so it's hard to peg Holmes in the same genre in a lot of ways.

That's why SHCD is so fun - it really puts you in the frame of mind of one of the people in awe of Sherlock's powers, participating in the mystery along side him, not replacing him per se. Genius gameplay IMHO as a huge Holmes fan.

Oh, I agree. The enjoyment of Holmes is his quirky and unbelievable brilliance that we observe with Watson. As a result, most players dismiss Holmes' "score" because of these leaps. Still, it can feel like a cheat too because there's honestly no way you could have jumped like him.
 
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Jo Van Eyck
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Yes, that's the newspaper for case 5. The case introduction ends with something like "hey team, let's start our investigation tomorrow" so I think it's supposed to be "thematic" rather than a misprint. But it threw me of as well
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finished the case 5 a couple days ago and laughed when read the solution and how quick Holmes got it. i think most people will guess the likely culprit very quickly but would require more evidence than Holmes to be sure.

feels like no need to try to emulate Holmes as he must just follow his hunches (which are always proved correct)

prefer to solve the case in a logical, procedural manner. Even if it does take many more steps.
 
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TJ
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thecapn32 wrote:
adamw wrote:
Yeah, this violates straight up the Fair Play rules.


I know I'm a complete newb...but yeah, I agree with robwrigley. While I'm not a fan of this case's solution, Doyle didn't abide by most of those fair play rules. The Doyle books weren't designed to allow you to solve the crime - they were to be amused and excited by Holmes' antics. And, then, many times, to be just as shocked and surprised as Watson when the final truth was revealed. Doyle didn't write like Christie or the others, so it's hard to peg Holmes in the same genre in a lot of ways.

That's why SHCD is so fun - it really puts you in the frame of mind of one of the people in awe of Sherlock's powers, participating in the mystery along side him, not replacing him per se. Genius gameplay IMHO as a huge Holmes fan.


A lot of it really depends on the order in which you follow leads, as well; it's just the nature of the game. The case didn't seemed to violate the fair play rules because we felt duly prepared for it.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
We visited the criminal brain exhibition advertised in the newspaper early on (lead 1 or 2, I think) and found out that our 'client' had different handwriting than was known to his associates. This put us immediately on the track of a Jekyll/Hyde situation, a dissociative identity disorder, or an evil twin. The former ideas seemed more far fetched, but we didn't get confirmation of our lead theory until later on when we visited the family residence, saw the family photo, and found the upstairs room.


Edit:
Spoiler (click to reveal)
And as weary as the evil twin trope is, it felt slightly less ridiculous in this case because it explained the main victim's life's work and field of study.
 
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