Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 Hide
51 Posts
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » General Gaming

Subject: Examples of fiction (novels, stories) based on particular games? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
CARL SKUTSCH
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
Agricola, Sekigahara, Concordia, Innovation, COOKIE!!! (and Guinness)
badge
The problem in the equation is people. Eliminate that, everything works.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
We have plenty of games that use themes from fiction, but what about fiction that is based on a particular game (not some general concept of gaming). Not merely mentioning games ("We were playing Catan when the cops broke in...") but directly inspired by games. And not video games.

One obvious one is Through the Looking Glass, the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, which has a heavy chess theme.

I have a personal favorite "Von Goom's Gambit" by Victor Contoski, a lovely little short story about a chess player who discovers a chess opening so logically twisted that it destroys the minds of men.

So, other favorite game inspired fiction? Or just game inspired fiction that you are aware of?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marina SC
Canada
Toronto
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
There's a short story by (the spiffy) Steven Millhauser "A Game of Clue" from his collection The Barnum Museum. It alternates between vignettes of adult children playing Clue at a family reunion, and scenes from within the game (the playing pieces acting as characters). Not for children, btw, it's been a while, but there were some "adult situations" IIRC.

Speaking of Clue, there was also a children's book series where various mysteries using the characters would be presented and the solutions would be at the back of the book. I liked these a lot back in the day, and they coloured how I saw the Clue characters for the rest of my life. Forgetful Professor Plum for the win!

For chess, there's the story "The Three Sailors' Gambit" by Lord Dunsany. You can read it here: http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/dun/tawo/tawo19.htm
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve B
Ireland
Derry
flag msg tools
badge
EZ FLASH 3 FTW
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I have a bunch of Magic the Gathering novels but they are pretty terrible
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve Dee
United Kingdom
Gloucestershire
flag msg tools
Avatar
At the end of the (non-fiction) book "Ticket to Carcassonne" there is an amusing short story called "Throne of Games" set in a future where board games have become the #1 mainstream leisure activity. This toungue-in-cheek story takes place in a museum, in the "Rahdo Room", which is full of exhibits of classic games from the golden era of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Under the paving stones, the beach
United Kingdom
Huddersfield
West Yorkshire
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
skutsch wrote:
One obvious one is Through the Looking Glass, the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, which has a heavy chess theme.


Chess has been used loads in books.

Off the top of my head there's the "what if the chess pieces were real people with emotions" trope. (Poul Anderson's The Immortal Game)

Chess as metaphor for war. (This is all over the place, but Lord of the Rings is one of the more famous ones).

Chess played with human pieces. (Edgar Rice Burroughs's Chessmen of Mars .

I'm sure there's loads of books about other games, but I'm having trouble coming up with them.

Board games anyway. Dungeons and Dragons and the World of Darkness both spawned extensive booklines.

(There is indeed Vampire the Masquerade 'erotica' out there. I do not recommend it.)
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thom0909
United States
New York
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Roberto Bolaño's The Third Reich is based on, well, take a guess. I haven't read it.

Robert Coover's The Universal Baseball Association is based on a homemade variant of a Strat-o-matic-style board game. I have read it and love it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
CARL SKUTSCH
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
Agricola, Sekigahara, Concordia, Innovation, COOKIE!!! (and Guinness)
badge
The problem in the equation is people. Eliminate that, everything works.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm sure Go must be the source of a lot of fiction.

Kokomu by Daniel Gilbert is a Go story. It's in Pawn to Infinity, edited by Fred Saberhagen, which also contains the Von Goom's Gambit story I mentioned above.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bob
Netherlands
Utrecht
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The Malazan Book of the Fallen series is based on a GURPS campaign, does that count?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
T. Dauphin
Canada
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
Mashpotassium wrote:
There's a short story by (the spiffy) Steven Millhauser "A Game of Clue" from his collection The Barnum Museum. It alternates between vignettes of adult children playing Clue at a family reunion, and scenes from within the game (the playing pieces acting as characters). Not for children, btw, it's been a while, but there were some "adult situations" IIRC.

Speaking of Clue, there was also a children's book series where various mysteries using the characters would be presented and the solutions would be at the back of the book. I liked these a lot back in the day, and they coloured how I saw the Clue characters for the rest of my life. Forgetful Professor Plum for the win!

For chess, there's the story "The Three Sailors' Gambit" by Lord Dunsany. You can read it here: http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/dun/tawo/tawo19.htm


And, of course, there was Clue the movie. A pretty decent stage play was also produced.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
CARL SKUTSCH
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
Agricola, Sekigahara, Concordia, Innovation, COOKIE!!! (and Guinness)
badge
The problem in the equation is people. Eliminate that, everything works.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Warhammer and Warhammer 40k have inspired shelves and shelves full of officially licensed fiction. I haven't read any of it because I have standards but the reviews make it sound like some of them might be ok. And my teenager son (whose taste is questionable) has enjoyed a lot of them.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
T. Dauphin
Canada
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar

And another, really stellar movie, "Battleship". shake

I love this line from Rotten Tomatoes,

"It may offer energetic escapism for less demanding filmgoers, but Battleship is too loud, poorly written, and formulaic to justify its expense -- and a lot less fun than its source material."


There was a cartoon that aired in the 80s based directly on D&D, called "Dungeons and Dragons".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungeons_%26_Dragons_(TV_serie...)

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
RJD
United States
Quad-Cities
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
There's quite a large number of books based on the BattleTech/Mechwarrior setting. Some of the ones I've read (its' been a while) were hit or miss, but some were really very good.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Greg
United States
Seattle
Washington
flag msg tools
badge
"I was born not knowing and have had only a little time to change that here and there."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yeah, there are plenty of books written in worlds that primarily started in board games. Android and Magic: The Gathering come immediately to mind. None of them have ever interested me though.

skutsch wrote:
I'm sure Go must be the source of a lot of fiction.

I'd recommend the manga series Hikaru no Go. It's targeted at a younger crowd, but you learn a heck of a lot about the world of Go in it. I found it breezy and enjoyable.

In fact, if the game has any sort of traction in Japan, I'd wager there is a manga series that covers it in quite some depth. I know I've seen series on Shogi and Mahjong, for example.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Marina SC
Canada
Toronto
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
tanik wrote:
Mashpotassium wrote:
There's a short story by (the spiffy) Steven Millhauser "A Game of Clue" from his collection The Barnum Museum. It alternates between vignettes of adult children playing Clue at a family reunion, and scenes from within the game (the playing pieces acting as characters). Not for children, btw, it's been a while, but there were some "adult situations" IIRC.

Speaking of Clue, there was also a children's book series where various mysteries using the characters would be presented and the solutions would be at the back of the book. I liked these a lot back in the day, and they coloured how I saw the Clue characters for the rest of my life. Forgetful Professor Plum for the win!

For chess, there's the story "The Three Sailors' Gambit" by Lord Dunsany. You can read it here: http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/dun/tawo/tawo19.htm


And, of course, there was Clue the movie. A pretty decent stage play was also produced.


I'd like to see the movie again. I watched it when I was pretty young, and I remember being confused by the multiple endings thing
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
T. Dauphin
Canada
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar

skutsch wrote:
Warhammer and Warhammer 40k have inspired shelves and shelves full of officially licensed fiction. I haven't read any of it because I have standards but the reviews make it sound like some of them might be ok. And my teenager son (whose taste is questionable) has enjoyed a lot of them.


Similarly, D&D led to countless choose-your-own adventure style books, some of which required you to memorize "spells" and keep stats, effectively becoming solo games themselves.

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gustavo Herodier
United Kingdom
Canterbury
Kent
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
skutsch wrote:
"We were playing Catan when the cops broke in..."


What, you mean like the Catan novel?

It's pretty decent, the author is better known for writing historic fiction and it shows
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
CARL SKUTSCH
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
Agricola, Sekigahara, Concordia, Innovation, COOKIE!!! (and Guinness)
badge
The problem in the equation is people. Eliminate that, everything works.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tanik wrote:

And another, really stellar movie, "Battleship". :shake:

I love this line from Rotten Tomatoes,

"It may offer energetic escapism for less demanding filmgoers, but Battleship is too loud, poorly written, and formulaic to justify its expense -- and a lot less fun than its source material."

It entirely deserves that bad review but I saw it and enjoyed it in a totally guilty secrets way. It was bad but fun to watch bad. Please, nobody rent it because I said that. It really is quite bad. BAD!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
david landes
United States
oak hill
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Unicorn Variation by Roger Zelazny is also about chess. Apparently, he was writing a short story for three different anthologies.. one about chess, one about unicorns and one about bars.. so he wrote a story about playing chess against a unicorn in a bar, sold it to all three anthologies and collected a Hugo award for the story.

A favorite of mine is The Player of Games by Iain Banks. The game that is played is not one we play, but it is very specific and described in great detail in the book.. and is central to the plot.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
christopher anderson
United States
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
skutsch wrote:
Warhammer and Warhammer 40k have inspired shelves and shelves full of officially licensed fiction. I haven't read any of it because I have standards but the reviews make it sound like some of them might be ok. And my teenager son (whose taste is questionable) has enjoyed a lot of them.


I've read
Horus Rising:
False Gods:
Galaxy in Flames:
The Flight of the Eisenstein:
Fulgrim:

All part of the Horus Heresy. The first book is a really good read, and it sets a great background for anyone getting into 40k. The main character, Garviel Loken, is well-written, and I fully enjoyed his path. The Flight of the Eisenstein is an awesome adventure. I was on the edge of my seat during the entire novel. I planned on reading all the book in the Horus Heresy, but I'm an English teacher, and I have much reading on my plate.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
CARL SKUTSCH
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
Agricola, Sekigahara, Concordia, Innovation, COOKIE!!! (and Guinness)
badge
The problem in the equation is people. Eliminate that, everything works.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
SEGRETO wrote:
skutsch wrote:
Warhammer and Warhammer 40k have inspired shelves and shelves full of officially licensed fiction. I haven't read any of it because I have standards but the reviews make it sound like some of them might be ok. And my teenager son (whose taste is questionable) has enjoyed a lot of them.


I've read
Horus Rising:
False Gods:
Galaxy in Flames:
The Flight of the Eisenstein:
Fulgrim:

All part of the Horus Heresy. The first book is a really good read, and it sets a great background for anyone getting into 40k. The main character, Garviel Loken, is well-written, and I fully enjoyed his path. The Flight of the Eisenstein is an awesome adventure. I was on the edge of my seat during the entire novel. I planned on reading all the book in the Horus Heresy, but I'm an English teacher, and I have much reading on my plate.

Sounds good! Don't take my ignorant snobbishness seriously.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Barton
England
Berkshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
dklx3 wrote:
A favorite of mine is The Player of Games by Iain Banks. The game that is played is not one we play, but it is very specific and described in great detail in the book.. and is central to the plot.


TPoG is pretty great. I really enjoyed it.

Also, The Twilight Realm is a YA tale about a group of 5 friends who get sucked into a pen & paper RPG.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Klaus Gunther Herzog
United States
Torrance
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tanik wrote:

skutsch wrote:
Warhammer and Warhammer 40k have inspired shelves and shelves full of officially licensed fiction. I haven't read any of it because I have standards but the reviews make it sound like some of them might be ok. And my teenager son (whose taste is questionable) has enjoyed a lot of them.


Similarly, D&D led to countless choose-your-own adventure style books, some of which required you to memorize "spells" and keep stats, effectively becoming solo games themselves.



Not to mention the dozens of Dragonlance novels. And Gygax's Greyhawk novels. Never got past the first of the latter, but it wasn't half bad. I suspect a ghost writer.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steve C
United States
West
Minnesota
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
tanik wrote:

skutsch wrote:
Warhammer and Warhammer 40k have inspired shelves and shelves full of officially licensed fiction. I haven't read any of it because I have standards but the reviews make it sound like some of them might be ok. And my teenager son (whose taste is questionable) has enjoyed a lot of them.


Similarly, D&D led to countless choose-your-own adventure style books, some of which required you to memorize "spells" and keep stats, effectively becoming solo games themselves.

Phew, I thought I was the only one who remembered Lone Wolf...

I should dig those out of my basement sometime, just to see how I fare.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Geki
United States
Providence
Rhode Island
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nabokov' "LuZin's defense" is a classic masterpiece and I have pleasant memories of Maurensig's "Luneburg variation ". Both rely heavily on chess although the characters are obviously the ultimate focus of the books
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike
United States
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
The short story "Unsound Variations" by George R.R. Martin is another chess-themed work.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.