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Subject: Any games out there with a 'haggling' mechanism? rss

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Anna F.
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Plenty of games have trading, auction, or other economic mechanisms, but are there any with a bargaining or haggling strategy? Either player against player or player against board.

I have money and I want a thing at a market stall. I offer $5 for something marked $20. Seller says no way, $18, or I can sell you two for $25. Etc until we mutually agree on $10 for the item.

I am looking for more of a formalized mechanism rather than informal trading as in Catan.
 
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Eric Brosius
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My favorite 18xx game for six players is two games of 1846 with three players each.
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Basari (which I enjoy but haven't played for far too long) has a formalized haggling mechanism.
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JT Schiavo
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No games comes to mind with formalized haggling mechanics, but it seems like it would be viable in every trading game, as long as there is a fine enough granularity to currency.

In Catan, you're generally trading resources, which aren't very granular. A sheep and a clay are both a single unit of resource.

In Sheriff of Nottingham you can haggle with the Sheriff, although it could hurt your cause by making you look guilty if a deal can't be worked out. "I'll give you two coins if you let me through with my five apples." "Oh, so you have something hidden in here? I'd make more than two coins by searching." "Okay, I'll give you two coins, and an Apple." "I do like apples, but..." "No coins, two apples." "Deal. No search." Player pulls out four contraband and one apple, gives one apple to Sheriff, deal done.


I would say haggling depends more on the group and less on the mechanics.
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JT Schiavo
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Eric Brosius wrote:
Basari (which I enjoy but haven't played for far too long) has a formalized haggling mechanism.


Reading the rules to Basari, the formalized haggling seems almost like an auction, with specific rules for what constitutes a higher bid. Again, the granularity of the resources available (four colors of gem stone) allows this type of mechanic to function. The fact that it's always escalating is interesting, though, rather than the traditional 'meet-in-the-middle' bargain like first post mentioned. Sounds fun.
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Eric Brosius
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My favorite 18xx game for six players is two games of 1846 with three players each.
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It feels more like haggling than an auction in practice.
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John Burt
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in Chinatown, the main mechanism is haggling/trading. There are few restrictions on what you can do.
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B C Z
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snapdragon23 wrote:
Plenty of games have trading, auction, or other economic mechanisms, but are there any with a bargaining or haggling strategy? Either player against player or player against board.

I have money and I want a thing at a market stall. I offer $5 for something marked $20. Seller says no way, $18, or I can sell you two for $25. Etc until we mutually agree on $10 for the item.

I am looking for more of a formalized mechanism rather than informal trading as in Catan.



Chinatown
Parts Unknown
New Angeles
Planet Steam (Maybe?)
Monopoly when trading properties
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Boaty McBoatface
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crinaya wrote:
No games comes to mind with formalized haggling mechanics, but it seems like it would be viable in every trading game, as long as there is a fine enough granularity to currency.

In Catan, you're generally trading resources, which aren't very granular. A sheep and a clay are both a single unit of resource.

In Sheriff of Nottingham you can haggle with the Sheriff, although it could hurt your cause by making you look guilty if a deal can't be worked out. "I'll give you two coins if you let me through with my five apples." "Oh, so you have something hidden in here? I'd make more than two coins by searching." "Okay, I'll give you two coins, and an Apple." "I do like apples, but..." "No coins, two apples." "Deal. No search." Player pulls out four contraband and one apple, gives one apple to Sheriff, deal done.


I would say haggling depends more on the group and less on the mechanics.
I will give you one sheep for two clay...Make it three and e have a deal.
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Scott Russell
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Res Publica has a pretty formalized haggling. The player on turn offers half of the deal, either what he wants or what he'll give. The other players each may fill in the other half and then the original player may take any one or none of the offers.
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Kelly Bass
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Eric Brosius wrote:
Basari (which I enjoy but haven't played for far too long) has a formalized haggling mechanism.
I preferred Edel, Stein & Reich over Basari and Basari: Das Kartenspiel.

But I agree with Brosius that it does feel like haggling even though it may sound like an auction. Perhaps it's because of the 2 players trying to do the same action, the player offering to pay the most to do it gives their bid to the other player (instead of the bank).
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Anna F.
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I agree that most any game with any kind of trading can involve haggling with the right crowd.

I was thinking of a board game about shopping in a souk or bazaar, the way much of the world does retail buying. The exchange is always cash for goods, and there is always that meet-in-the-middle strategy with both entities maximizing their end of things. And there is always the 'walk away' option.

Fische Fluppen Frikadellen sort of does that with a nod to the game "Bigger and Better", except mainly bartering goes on rather than haggling.
 
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Joe Huber

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Sackson's classic Haggle...
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Anna F.
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huber wrote:
Sackson's classic Haggle...


That one looks really neat!
 
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JT Schiavo
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slatersteven wrote:
crinaya wrote:
No games comes to mind with formalized haggling mechanics, but it seems like it would be viable in every trading game, as long as there is a fine enough granularity to currency.

In Catan, you're generally trading resources, which aren't very granular. A sheep and a clay are both a single unit of resource.

In Sheriff of Nottingham you can haggle with the Sheriff, although it could hurt your cause by making you look guilty if a deal can't be worked out. "I'll give you two coins if you let me through with my five apples." "Oh, so you have something hidden in here? I'd make more than two coins by searching." "Okay, I'll give you two coins, and an Apple." "I do like apples, but..." "No coins, two apples." "Deal. No search." Player pulls out four contraband and one apple, gives one apple to Sheriff, deal done.


I would say haggling depends more on the group and less on the mechanics.
I will give you one sheep for two clay...Make it three and e have a deal.


Maybe it is just my group when playing Catan, but I don't think we've ever seriously traded with another player for anything more than 2 for 1. We'd usually trade with a port before giving another play any resources to work with.
 
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"that's a smith and wesson, and you've had your six"
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My favorite, Bohnanza. And another favorite of mine, I'm the Boss!
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Stephen Eckman
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Panic on Wall Street! (also called Master of Commerce)
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Brad Miller
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Genoa for a vary granular and grindy negotiation game.
Quo Vadis? for a Roman senate setting, though this is pretty granular to call it haggling.
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Denis Begin
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Tammany Hall winning strategy in this game usually involves a lot of deals.

MunchkinI recall Munchkin had rules regarding which parts of negotiated deals were binding
 
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James Arias
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Bit of a stretch, but the market manipulation in Sky Traders. Only because negotiation may be required to get other players to use their "points" the way you want.
 
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Boaty McBoatface
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crinaya wrote:
slatersteven wrote:
crinaya wrote:
No games comes to mind with formalized haggling mechanics, but it seems like it would be viable in every trading game, as long as there is a fine enough granularity to currency.

In Catan, you're generally trading resources, which aren't very granular. A sheep and a clay are both a single unit of resource.

In Sheriff of Nottingham you can haggle with the Sheriff, although it could hurt your cause by making you look guilty if a deal can't be worked out. "I'll give you two coins if you let me through with my five apples." "Oh, so you have something hidden in here? I'd make more than two coins by searching." "Okay, I'll give you two coins, and an Apple." "I do like apples, but..." "No coins, two apples." "Deal. No search." Player pulls out four contraband and one apple, gives one apple to Sheriff, deal done.


I would say haggling depends more on the group and less on the mechanics.
I will give you one sheep for two clay...Make it three and e have a deal.


Maybe it is just my group when playing Catan, but I don't think we've ever seriously traded with another player for anything more than 2 for 1. We'd usually trade with a port before giving another play any resources to work with.
we Do it a lot until you get a three to one port. Sadly you have to sometimes do this to get a port (ohh great three stone and no brick, and I only 1 brick to build a port).

It may just be how the dice roll.
 
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Andy Latto
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crinaya wrote:
Eric Brosius wrote:
Basari (which I enjoy but haven't played for far too long) has a formalized haggling mechanism.


Reading the rules to Basari, the formalized haggling seems almost like an auction, with specific rules for what constitutes a higher bid. Again, the granularity of the resources available (four colors of gem stone) allows this type of mechanic to function. The fact that it's always escalating is interesting, though, rather than the traditional 'meet-in-the-middle' bargain like first post mentioned. Sounds fun.

I think the reason it feels more like haggling than an auction is that different gems have different values to different people at different times, with a "higher" bid not necessarily being worth more. There's an effective bidding strategy, which can be described as "you'd better take this very small pile of gold, because if you don't, I'll offer you an enormous pile of dirt instead" that makes it feel much more like haggling than bidding.
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Peter Hawes
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An older game called "Intrigue" published by F.X.Schmid (and later Amigo) is designed entirely around haggling.

You have members of your family that you must send to other players' estates and hope to be given a job there. The salaries for these jobs varies from 10,000 to 100,000 so you obviously want the better paid jobs so you haggle with the owner of the estate to give you a better paid job and you can bribe him to do so. The fun comes when several players all want the best jobs and you try to outbid each-other to get this job.

However, the twist is that no deals are binding and the owner can take your huge bribe which is higher than anyone else offered and then he can give the job to someone else. What is worse still, you may miss out on even a poorly paid job and your relative to sent to the central island and takes no further part in the game.

If you like such a game, which I do, it is the best game I have come across in this genre. But remember the whole game is nothing but haggling for jobs and treacherous backstabbing. Great for those that like this sort of thing. I think the FX Schmidt version is the better because there are 5 jobs at each estate instead of the only 4 in the Amigo version.
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marc lecours
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Churchill is a non monetary game where the main thing you are doing is haggling over military and diplomatic issues. Even though it isn't really haggling, it feels like haggling.
 
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Ben Smith
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I would think that the beauty of haggling is that it is not really formalized but is anything goes, at least in theory, and it turns the seller into the game.

Tha said, I've travelled a bit and different cultures have different cultural norms for haggling, and it almost amounts to a formalized system (I'd be interested in sociological studies (summarized and oversimplified for my reading pleasure, ideally) on the topic).

For instance, in Papua New Guinea, it would be rude to haggle over the price of any vegetables or produce. You just don't do it, and if you asked they'd probably say no. But, you can haggle over the price of carvings or shells or string bags and other handcrafted stuff, and you do this initially just by asking if there's a "number two price", and they'll maybe lower it a bit, and then maybe with some bargaining you can lower it again if you tell them what a good friend they are, etc.

In Egypt, they are HARD bargainers in my experience. Whew! The rule there (and maybe many places) is that once you as a buyer offer a price, you are guaranteed to not get it for that price, nor for less. That simply sets the lower bounds of the negotiation, and you'll meet somewhere in between what you last said and them. So the best tactic (which I discovered by accident, or indifference) was to stall as long as possible without naming my price, and let them lower their price multiple times to try and tempt me into the negotiation.

Anyway, all that said: their are differnt cultural norms for bargaining, but in the end it's about knowing the seller, and I'm not sure if rules more formal than that makes sense.

Oh, and a +1 for Bohnanza! It sums up the way that it's all about playing the person.
And if you want to look at it from a different way, Diplomacy is a game of bargaining because it's all about the deal-making and offering enough to tempt others into cooperation, while keeping enough for yourself to gain the upper hand.
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Tuomas Korppi
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I do not know about board games, but the classic Commodore 64 video game Mule has exactly this. Those willing to buy start with the price zero, and those willing to sell start with a high price. Then the players move their characters up and down, and when a seller's character and a buyer's character are on the same height, a trade is done.
 
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