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Star Trek: Fleet Captains» Forums » General

Subject: Why so many "cloaking" options? rss

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John Van Wagoner
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Ex: the klingon IKS NEGH'VAR has 3 columns of cloaking to choose from? why?

for each column 3 of the 4 options are the same ("C"), while one column has 10 for engines, another has 9 for engines, and the third has 7 for engines...since the rules say you can select any column, why would anyone select a column other than the one with 10 engines?

thanks...
 
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Barry Miller
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Because the level of damage your ship is at determines which of those cloak ratings you get to use. If your ship has no damage ("White level"), then when you cloak, your engines are now rated at "10". If your ship has taken one level of damage (to "Yellow), then if you cloak you must select only the cloak column that is attached to the yellow section, which reduces your engine rating to "9". And finally, if your ship has suffered two levels of damage (to "red"), then you must select the cloak column attached to the red section, which further reduces your engine rating to "7".

If you repair your ship back to "white", then you can once again use the "White" cloak column when you cloak.

BTW, what part of the rulebook are you finding to be misleading, so that we can help you read it in perhaps a different way?

Reference: Rulebook, page 14, bottom paragraph, first sentence.

Hope this helps!

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John Van Wagoner
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thanks...couldn't figure it out because:

- we won't bother even turning the dials; way too hard to read...and rotating seems like it'll eventually lead to a broken stand...we'll be using the paperclip method on the cards :-)

- and looking at the cards, the blue cloaking columns didn't seem to be attached to any particular color (alert)...but after your explanation and looking at the columns again I can see a slightly larger "separation" between white column 3 and the cloaking column, and again between yellow column 3 and the next blue cloaking column (but never would have picked it out if you hadn't explained it...thanks)
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Barry Miller
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Glad to help. As far as using the dials... I consider them one of the best elements of the game, yet I had the same issues as you. So I decided to fix them!

1) To fix how hard it is to turn the dials, follow the directions in this thread. I did, and now all my dials turn like a warm knife through warm butter!
go here: How to Properly Fix Dials That Are Difficult to Rotate (or Won't Rotate At All!)

2) To fix the readability of the numbers, I used file found in the files section, but quite frankly and honesty, wasn't happy with the way the numbers aligned. So I started to make my own. It's been a work in progress for a few years as other, newer games have taken priority over my time... but I WILL finish it sooner than later, and once I do, will upload the file! In the meantime, here's a quick picture of how my own modified dial numbers compare to the original. (Hopefully you can figure out which is which, otherwise what's the point, eh)?

(My numbers are on the left, BTW). I wish now that I had taken the picture from farther away, as that's where the difference really comes to light.



And finally, in my games, we actually use both methods to track the systems ratings. Considering that it can be a PITA to see the numbers on the dials when the models are on the other side of the board (even my modded numbers), we also use the paperclip method (except we don't use paperclips... more later). Thusly the paperclip, or "local method" is only for allowing the player to maintain an awareness of what his settings are... i.e., it's information kept "locally" while the ship may be across the galaxy. It's purely a matter of convenience for the player to track the ratings on the ship card.

But for the official rating - that used for game play - is what the ship dials are for. I.e., the rating set on the clix dial is the "rating of record". IOW, it's the only one that counts. Whatever the ship's dial shows, is the rating that's used for playing the game. It doesn't matter if the paperclip on the player's card is different.

This policy has several purposes:
- Every official rating change made to each ship is fully visible to all players.
- All players have the ability to see the ratings of any ship on the board, instead of having to hunt down a ship's card in another player's area to learn its rating.
- Eliminates any questions concerning the validity of where a paper clip is at, or supposed to be, or meant to be located on a ship's card.
- Yet the paperclips on the ship cards still afford the player the convenience of not having to constantly check his own ships to remind himself of what ratings he's set.
- And finally, the above bulletpoint makes it so that the size of the numbers on the dial aren't all that critical.

The downfall is that each player must be on the ball so that when he makes a rating adjustment, that he changes both the ship's dial and his paperclip. Again, the ship's dial reflects the rating of record, while the paperclip is only used for the player's own convenience.

And about those paper clips... we don't use paperclips due to the way they crease and mutilate the cards. Instead we use the sticky arrows like these:


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