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Subject: Die vs Dice rss

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NoFunAtAll
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To almost all video reviewers:


Die is the singular form and Dice the plural, please stop using them willy nilly , or are we at a point in grammatical history where the difference no longer matters?
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Duncan Russell
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Although language needs rules for grammar and spellings so we can communicate efficiently, language is also a living thing that changes. Try reading Geoffrey Chaucer and see what's happened over a few hundred years.

We say one deer and ten deer. Who cares if people call a die a dice? It sounds better saying dice anyway.
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J J
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Nofunatalll wrote:
To almost all video reviewers:


Die is the singular form and Dice the plural, please stop using them willy nilly , or are we at a point in grammatical history where the difference no longer matters?


Funny thing about die/dice. The English are the most likely to call it a singular dice, because that's just how it is used (and has been for a long, long time).

I agree wholeheartedly about the correct usage, but you're on a hiding to nothing with this one
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Alain Curato
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Grammar aside, googling for dice is much easier than looking for die...
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Russ Williams
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Nofunatalll wrote:
To almost all video reviewers:


Die is the singular form and Dice the plural, please stop using them willy nilly , or are we at a point in grammatical history where the difference no longer matters?


As noted in Common English Mistakes and innumerable past threads, this is a difference in US vs UK English.

(And yet as an exception, apparently very few speakers of UK English translate Caesar's famous quote "alea iacta est" as "The dice is cast", but rather use the traditional "The die is cast".)

(That said, if you're talking specifically to US reviewers, then yeah, they should say "die" for a single die.)
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Dave Platt
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As an Englishman I can confirm that we always say dice, even when there is only one.
I'm currently designing a game and listed in the contents is "1 Dice."
We only use "die" when quoting literature and playing boardgames with The Queen.
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Jon New
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As an Englishman, I can confirm that "I" always say die.
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Dave Platt
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talismanisland wrote:
As an Englishman, I can confirm that "I" always say die.


Of course your majesty.
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NoFunAtAll
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I guess being an EFL teacher makes me a bit too sensitive to the matter, teaching grammar all day makes it hard to turn that switch off when listerning to native speakers .
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marc lecours
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English is not perfect. Therefore the language evolves. The language conservatives want things to stay the same and familiar and "correct". But the word "die" is a homonym of a word with very negative connotations. Dice is a homonym of the verb "to dice" which seems to mean to cut up in cubes.

Also "dice" is an irregular plural, "dies" would be more logical. Therefore ordinary people are using "dice" as a singular. "dice" does not really sound like a plural anyways (with the exception of "mice" which should be "mouses" anyways).

Maybe in a 100 years it will be "I rolled one dice" and "I rolled three dices".

One of the great strengths of the English language is that it evolves faster than many other languages (including my other language French).
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Will Shaw
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According to the OED:
Quote:
In modern standard English, the singular die (rather than dice) is uncommon. Dice is used for both the singular and the plural.


https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/die
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Timmo Warner
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willshaw67 wrote:
According to the OED:
Quote:
In modern standard English, the singular die (rather than dice) is uncommon. Dice is used for both the singular and the plural.


https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/die


Judging purely from my own experience, I was a teenager before I EVER heard anyone call a single die a die rather than a dice.

In fact, it was and still is usually only people who play games outside the mainstream who ever bring it up. I first encountered it from D&D players.
 
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Steve Greasby
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I say die but I don't mind changing. Containers use the singular, i.e. shoe box, match box, coin case, etc. Yet we say dice tower and dice tray.
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Robert Bracey
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russ wrote:

(And yet as an exception, apparently very few speakers of UK English translate Caesar's famous quote "alea iacta est" as "The dice is cast", but rather use the traditional "The die is cast".)


It may have appealed because in English it creates a homonym, is Caesar casting his lot in with chance or is he forging the tool that will stamp his destiny (the 'die' that strikes a coin). There is no doubt that Caesar's supposed original remark refers to throwing dice and the obligation to then move (the Latin, or Greek, is unambiguous) but the ambiguity it creates may have appealed to translators.
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Dave Dodson
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Everyone knows that the singular of mice is mouse so I think it's pretty clear that the singular of dice should be douse.
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Gianluca Casu
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DaveNewcastle wrote:
Everyone knows that the singular of mice is mouse so I think it's pretty clear that the singular of dice should be douse.


YOU WIN!
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Trent Boardgamer
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Well at least it doesn't get as confusing as sheep and fish
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Tom anonymous
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I say dice, so do all my friends. We live in a world where literally means not literally so any objections to the malleability of language are literally pointless.
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Russ Williams
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RobertBr wrote:
There is no doubt that Caesar's supposed original remark refers to throwing dice and the obligation to then move (the Latin, or Greek, is unambiguous) but the ambiguity it creates may have appealed to translators.

The original Latin "alea iacta est" grammatically/syntactically mentions a single die (as opposed to "aleae iactae sunt" for plural dice). I.e. "alea" is the singular nominative, and the verb form is also singular.

So even though dice games typically use more than one die, it seems that the quotation attributed to Caesar unambiguously refers to throwing a single die. Am I misunderstanding your point?
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American in Chile
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Sam Lam I Am
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I understand what is being communicated whether the speaker says die or dice.

I also understand people that use personal pronouns incorrectly, but it doesn't improve my opinion of them.

Hearing someone talk about a single dice just sounds wrong. It's like saying John and myself went to the store. Common to hear, and yet cringe-inducing. yuk
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David H
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As an Englishman I can confirm I call them number cubes.
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Brandon
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rubberchicken wrote:

Maybe in a 100 years it will be "I rolled one dice" and "I rolled three dices".


I have heard this numerous times when playing games with non-native speakers. English has become the common language between people, even when none of them are native speakers, and this will have a profound effect on the evolution of the language. So, your prediction actually has some weight, I'd say.
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Robert Bracey
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russ wrote:

So even though dice games typically use more than one die, it seems that the quotation attributed to Caesar unambiguously refers to throwing a single die. Am I misunderstanding your point?


Completely. In fact so completely that I went back to what I wrote and checked. I was referring to the ambiguity the word creates in English (the latin is unambiguous) between die (a random number generator) and die (a stamp used to make an impression), both of which were current by the sixteenth/seventeenth century, and both of which are 'cast' (again in two different ways) so might have appealed to translators.
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Russ Williams
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RobertBr wrote:
I was referring to the ambiguity the word creates in English (the latin is unambiguous) between die (a random number generator) and die (a stamp used to make an impression), both of which were current by the sixteenth/seventeenth century, and both of which are 'cast' (again in two different ways) so might have appealed to translators.

Aha! OK, thanks for clarifying!
 
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