Dom Rougier
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Following from the previous post on movement:

Advanced Example of Movement (Basic Game) - Get Your Ass to Mars (and back)

It was requested that I did something similar for industrialisation, and therefore covering the other operations in the Basic Game. Similar to that one, this is not intended to be a simple example, but is intended to cover as many of the rules as possible, so it's far from an optimum one.

This mission also makes use of the crew card, which is certainly not required. In anything other than the Basic game, crew will protect from glitches, which are useful, but here I've mostly used them as a light method of landing a heavy payload, since the hall effect thruster by itself is not up to the task.

Since the previous thread covered movement, I'll try to skip over as much of that as possible.

It's hard to find depictions of appropriate large-scale spacecraft, but this is similar to what we're aiming for, albeit with entirely the wrong propulsion system.




Mission concept:

Send a Robonaut and a Refinery to Hertha. Prospect, Industrialise and Produce advanced technology in-situ, then Free Market that technology at LEO.

Following on from the previous example, we have a Hall Effect thruster sitting in Low Earth Orbit, and have returned the NASA crew card to hand.

We will assume that some time has passed, and through Research operations, we have developed the CVD Molding refinery, the Flywheel Tractor Buggy robonaut, and have managed to save up 8 WT.

In LEO:


In hand:


The signposted route to Hertha is to follow the purple line, for a total of four burns (three if using the fly-bys, but those are not in the Basic Game)

The total dry mass of all of the above combined is 8, and four burns with a Hall Effect thruster would put our wet mass to 13, requiring 5 WT in addition to the cost of boosting this material to LEO.

Mostly for illustrative purposes, we're going to do it with 3 WT of fuel. In practice, this isn't going to save us a huge amount on this particular mission.

Year One:

We perform a Boost Operation, sending the NASA Crew, robonaut and refinery into LEO. This costs us 6 WT (for total mass of 6), but we get one back, due to NASA's Faction privilege, leaving us with 3 WT. This joins the Hall Effect thruster in LEO, and we move all these cards into our rocket stack.

We now load all three WT onto the rocket, leaving us with a fuel strip which looks like this:



Rather than following the Purple line, we're going to follow the Red line again, with the intention of stopping on Deimos to refuel.



We choose our thruster and derive our thrust ("TMPs") for this turn as 3 - 1 (modified by our wet mass, which is in the "Transport -1" region). This means we can move through a maximum of two burns this turn.

Our year one rocket move is then to move through two burns (expending four steps of fuel), stopping on the Hohmann pivot on the red line.



Year Two

At the start of this move we select our thruster again. We aren't intending to move through any burns, but we are intending to land on Deimos. To land, we need to have a modified thrust higher than the site size, which for Deimos will be anything greater than one.

Since the Hall Effect thruster has a thrust of 3, minus one for the wet mass, we can use that to land on Deimos, without having to switch to our crew thruster for this turn, so it doesn't matter which thruster we use.

We move up the red path to the Sol-Mars lagrange point, then move onto the Deimos site.

Deimos has three water drops, or a "Hydration" of 3. That means that our crew card (ISRU 4) cannot exploit the resources of Deimos, but fortunately we brought along a robonaut with a sufficiently low ISRU rating to do so.

Once landed, we perform a Refuel operation using our robonaut. This adds a single fuel tank to the rocket, since the formula is 1 + Hydration - ISRU, which in this case is 1 + 3 - 3, or "1".

Year Three

Our robonaut performs a second refuel operation, adding another tank of fuel following the pink lines. Our fuel strip looks like this, after both operations:



We can now choose our thruster for the rocket move. Our modified thrust is still higher than the site size, so we can take off with the Hall effect thruster. There are no lander burns at Deimos (it's too small), so we avoid any of the complications we had coming back from Mars in the previous example.



The route we are intending to take follows the large arc, avoiding the clump of asteroids near Ceres, Vesta and Psyche.

Since our thrust has been modified down to 2, we can only move through two burns this turn. We'd like to go further, but our tiny electric engines can only do so much.

We lift off, move to the Mars lagrange, and follow the large arc up the board, passing through two burns, and stopping on an intersection. It's not important in this example precisely where we stop, but if we had solar supports or the possibility of combat, then this could be a much more meaningful decision.

Our fuel strip is currently in this state:



And we have fuel for one more burn.


Year four

We select our thruster (staying with the Hall effect thruster) and move our rocket again, through the final burn, and ending on the Hohmann pivot by the cluster of asteroids that mark our destination.



Our rocket is out of fuel, but since there are no more burns in between our current position and our destination, we don't need to expend any.

After this move, we will decommission the Hall Effect thruster back to hand. We don't need it anymore since it's thrust (3 - 0 = 3) will not be sufficient to land us on Hertha, which is a size 3 site. We could leave this as an outpost in our current position, but for the purposes of this example this is useless to us.

This adjusts our dry mass and wet mass figures down by two spaces, until both are on the "6".

We have no relevant Operation for this turn, so now would be a good time to perform an Income operation, Research a new card, Free Market a hand card, etc.

Year Five

At the start of the move, we choose our Crew thruster. This makes our thrust 10, which will be more than sufficient for landing on Hertha. Our rocket consists of our Crew card, robonaut and refinery.

We move our rocket to the lagrange point by Hertha, and then land easily with our ludicrously overpowered chemical engines, expending no fuel (which is good, because we don't have any).

Now we are on the surface, our Buggy robonaut can perform a Prospect operation, since it's ISRU rating is equal or lower than the site's hydration.

We roll the die, and attempt to roll equal or under 3 (the size of the site). Since this is a buggy robonaut, if we fail here we can re-roll this die. Assuming we succeed, we put down a claim disk and earn a victory point.

Year Six

Now the site is claimed, we can perform an Industrialise operation. This involves decommissioning the robonaut and refinery, and putting them into hand. This adjusts the dry mass of our rocket all the way down to 1, since our rocket only consists of a crew card.

We put a cube on top of this claim disk to form a factory. This also lowers the exploitation track by one



This means that this factory is currently worth 10 VP, but this may change.

If a second factory is built on an "M" site, they will each be worth 8 VP at the end of the game, since the products they are creating will be more common.

At this point, we are going to decommission our crew into a colony. This puts the crew card back to hand, and puts a dome of the appropriate colour onto the factory. It also removes the rocket figure from the map, since there is nothing in the rocket stack.

Each factory can only have one dome, no matter how many crew cards are decommissioned there. That's worth an additional 2 VP at the end of the game, and domes can be converted back into crew cards, if the crew card is currently in hand.

In the basic game, factories determine the end of the game, and you will probably only get to build one or two before the game ends.

This factory will allow for factory refuelling, which is significantly more efficient than ISRU refuelling (each Factory refuel = up to 8 tanks of water or 20 of dirt).

Year Seven

Since we have an M factory and M-type cards in hand, we can now build products in-situ.

Year 7 is therefore spent performing an ET Production operation. We could add this directly to an Outpost stack in the same location as our Factory, but in this case the mission is to sell this product at LEO, which means that we want to add this to the Freighter stack instead. This creates a freighter, and puts a freighter cube on the map on Hertha.

We produce the black sided robonaut.



Notably, this black side is significantly lighter. This will help tremendously in getting our second factory. The robonaut is still a buggy, but it has a much lower ISRU rating, which opens up more options for prospecting and industrialisation.

But... we're in this for the money.

Freighters are abstracted in the basic game, and they represent low thrust, high efficiency engines which are suitable for unmanned missions, carrying bulk payloads. They are represented by your large cube.

Freighters move like (and in addition to) your rocket, and are considered to have a thrust of 1 at all times. No fuel is tracked for them. This means that our freighter does not have enough thrust to take off from the surface of Hertha.

Fortunately, factories abstract a certain amount of infrastructure, in this case, electromagnetic rails to launch payloads without expending rocket fuel.

This is dangerous, so this will cause the loss of the rocket on a die roll of a "1". As ever, you may pay 4WT to avoid making this die roll.

This Factory-assisted take-off means that you effectively treat the site as if it were size 0. This means that any lander burns still take effect, but the 1 thrust freighter can still take off and land.

Aside from this, Freighter movement in the Basic Game is identical to a rocket with a thrust of 1 and no fuel expenditure.

The freighter is then moved to the Hertha lagrange point, and out to the pivot where we decommissioned the Hall effect thruster.

Years 8-12

The freighter now follows the purple route back to Earth, each time moving through only one burn.

By year 12, we reach LEO, and can perform a Free Market operation to sell our Black-sided Buggy robonaut. This removes the freighter cube from the board, and returns the robonaut to your hand. The operation nets you an enormous 10 WT, since the exploitation chart is currently on the 10 VP slot for M-type products.
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Thomas Billaud
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Again Gentleman, thanks a lot.

Your help is much appreciated. Your example is so easy to read and understand.

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Mark von Minden
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Thanks for another helpful writeup, Dom. I'm still learning the game, but one thing I noticed:
Domfluff wrote:
This Factory-assisted take-off means that you effectively treat the site as if it were size 0. This means that any lander burns still take effect, but the 1 thrust freighter can still take off and land.

From G3:
Quote:
You are not allowed to make a factory-assisted landing or a factory-assisted lift-off to enter a lander burn.

So, if there were a lander burn there, the freighter simply couldn't take off, correct?
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Robert Fox
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Dom Rougier
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mrkvm wrote:
if there were a lander burn there, the freighter simply couldn't take off, correct?


Yes.

This means that any ET product would have to either be left in-situ as an outpost - this could later form a rocket, for example, or lifted out of the gravity well by a rocket with appropriate thrust.

The Freighter module provides some more options - freighter module cards can be carried on a rocket ("towed" as the rules have it).
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Matt B
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mrkvm wrote:

So, if there were a lander burn there, the freighter simply couldn't take off, correct?

Correct, you would need to land (or ET produce) a thruster at the site, make them into your rocket stack, and then move them.

Smaller size sites are great because you can access them much easier, the down side of course is that you don't have a guarantee to successfully prospect there.

Also, while this example is great for a beginners guide I don't think I can support landing on Deimos with a buggy and not trying to prospect it. It's a low chance of success (about 30% in total), but the location is great and the size makes it super easy to access.
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Dom Rougier
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TokMor wrote:
Also, while this example is great for a beginners guide I don't think I can support landing on Deimos with a buggy and not trying to prospect it. It's a low chance of success (about 30% in total), but the location is great and the size makes it super easy to access.


Quite right. Unlike the Mars example, I intentionally avoided doing some things, for the purposes of covering as many rules as possible - the best possible outcome is people looking at that and thinking "What If I do *this*..."
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Matt Watkins
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I feel like these examples should be collected into another rulebook and published along with the others. Really useful!
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Dom Rougier
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Basic rules not covered in those two examples:


- Research operations

- Water and Dirt rockets

- Thrust modifications:

Afterburners
Pushable rockets
Solar modifiers

- Ventures

- Glory in any detail


Anything else? I think that's pretty much it.
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Sergio Padilla
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Domfluff wrote:

We move our rocket to the lagrange point by Hertha, and then land easily with our ludicrously overpowered chemical engines, expending no fuel (which is good, because we don't have any).

I just can wrap my brain around this. And probably this is no the right thread to ask this, but how is this working thematically? I'd assume the rocket would need some fuel to land.
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Drake Coker
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srpadlop wrote:
Domfluff wrote:

We move our rocket to the lagrange point by Hertha, and then land easily with our ludicrously overpowered chemical engines, expending no fuel (which is good, because we don't have any).

I just can wrap my brain around this. And probably this is no the right thread to ask this, but how is this working thematically? I'd assume the rocket would need some fuel to land.


Somewhere in the rules (forget where), it says that ships are assumed to always have small amounts of fuel for maneuvering and low-gravity landings. It's simply below the scale of the game to track.

Also, "fuel" is a bit of a misnomer in the game. The game technically tracks "propellant" (i.e. mass you send one direction so your ship goes in the opposite direction).
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Dom Rougier
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srpadlop wrote:
I just can wrap my brain around this. And probably this is no the right thread to ask this, but how is this working thematically? I'd assume the rocket would need some fuel to land.


Nah, this thread is fine.

High Frontier works on fairly rough scales - there's real maths behind everything, but it takes a necessarily granular view on things.

Thematically, this means that the rocket still has fuel, but it's low enough that it doesn't register on the fuel diagram. Why this is okay is that Hertha is a size three asteroid, which means it's gravity is 3 thousandths of a g, going by the scale in the glossary.

That's ludicrously small, to the point of being fairly hard to notice. In this example, the engine that is being used to land is powerful enough to lift off from Mars (albeit not with this payload), which is massively overbuilt for the job of hitching onto an asteroid. The amount of fuel required to land is therefore negligible in High Frontier scales.
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Juan Valdez
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Olvenskol wrote:
The game technically tracks "propellant" (i.e. mass you send one direction so your ship goes in the opposite direction).


Since I haven't seen it linked, the rocket equation is a marvelous thing of wonder and beauty https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsiolkovsky_rocket_equation
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