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http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/cook-political-house-r...

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Cook Political Report on Friday morning changed its ratings for 20 House seats, predicting that Democrats’ odds of winning those districts has increased now that House Republicans passed a bill to repeal Obamacare.

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,” Cook Political Report’s David Wasserman wrote in a post explaining the ratings changes. “Not only did dozens of Republicans in marginal districts just hitch their names to an unpopular piece of legislation, Democrats just received another valuable candidate recruitment tool.”

He wrote that for some Republicans, backing the American Health Care Act is an “unequivocal political risk.”

Cook Political Report moved three districts from leaning Republican to toss-ups, 11 districts from likely Republican to leaning Republican and six districts from solid Republican to leaning Republican.


More of an FYI. Not much to discuss.

The movement in response to the vote isn't nearly enough.
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Dickie Crickets
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maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”


You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.
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It depends on what happens in the Senate. If the bill never actually passes, it'll just be seen as a usual celebrate-about-doing-nothing political exercise. If the bill ends up being nothing but a menu of features States can opt out of, then the damage, if any, will fall on the (usually heavily Gerrymandered) State legislatures. If the final bill screws up what's working, in California for example, only then might the Congressmen pay a significant price.

All Republican California Congressmen voted for the bill. This could be bad for them, but it's a long way to November 2018. Any number of things could push it out of the spotlight.

However, the way CA's elections work now makes it more dangerous. Districts have been set up by a kind of non-partisan commission, roughly 1/3 Dem, 1/3 Rep, 1/3 Ind--which doesn't reflect the electorate, but seems to have done a good job. Then, we have an open primary, so in a very red district, and we have some, the final election challenger could be another Republican.
 
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eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”


You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?

 
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lelandpike wrote:

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?


Drink!
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lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”


You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?



so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

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jeff brown wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”

You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.
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lelandpike wrote:
For starters, one that's voluntary.


Voluntary healthcare works wonderfully for voluntary illnesses and conditions.
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viclineal wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
For starters, one that's voluntary.


Voluntary healthcare works wonderfully for voluntary illnesses and conditions.


It's the core platform of the We Want To Be Die From Curable Illnesses party!
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I thought I was sick once... turned out I was just lazy.

Don't ram health care down our throats!
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lelandpike wrote:
jeff brown wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”

You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


What does this mean?

Okay so you have voluntary poor people and voluntary people with pre-existing conditions both who voluntarily want healthcare. How do we get them health care with voluntary Healthcare workers who voluntarily want to work?
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lelandpike wrote:
jeff brown wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”

You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.



Dog forbid you voluntarily get fired, then contract several forms of cancer, and then you voluntarily get a different perspective on life that isn't based in theory.
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Remember, medical studies have proven that prayer is a suitable curative for cancer, or any other disease, and actually has lower efficacy than drinking plain water and napping.

 
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lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”


You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?



Yes, I'm sure it was fatal to you, and didn't help a soul that needed healthcare, but couldn't receive it before.



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lelandpike wrote:
jeff brown wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”

You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


I'd be all OVER that plan if accidental injury and becoming seriously ill were also voluntary.
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Quote:
so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?


https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-09-29/u-s-healt...

One not made in America.
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lelandpike wrote:
Quote:

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


Choose one:
1. Healthcare insurance being voluntary.
2. A functional individual insurance market where insurance companies cannot deny people based on preconditions.

You can't have both.
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tmcvey wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
Quote:

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


Choose one:
1. Healthcare insurance being voluntary.
2. A functional individual insurance market where insurance companies cannot deny people based on preconditions.

You can't have both.


And it's trickier than that.

Because if you let people skip on insurance until they get sick then it's also non-functional.

And you can't give unlimited coverage to everyone under any system. The question is simply who will limit it and and what process they will use.

Our current system is better than it was in 2006-2008 but it is still much more costly than many other nations and results are only better for the top. And in some cases, under very dubious circumstances. Steve Jobs stole and wasted a liver that would have gone to a candidate who would have gotten a lifetime out of the same liver.

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Steve
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lelandpike wrote:
jeff brown wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”

You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.

I'm not sure, but this makes you seem like one of those Libertarians who want all Gov. functions to be funded by voluntary taxes/donations.

The rest of us know that the Founding Fathers tried that in a smaller more homogeneous nation, and it didn't work. Any such system has always failed. People make up reasons why they don't need to donate to some Gov. functions and they therefore fail to do what they are supposed to do.

Take a functioning civil court system for example. This costs money and it forces the jury members to waste their time to come in and be screened to reduce the jury pool from 70 down to 12 with 2 alternates, maybe. The people who need it twice in their life are very glad that it is there. They take it for granted. They don't send thank you letters to all the members of the jury pool who were sent home early, let alone all the tax payers who supported it until our guy needed it. But, without a civil court system I would bet my bottom dollar that people would be cheated a lot more than they are now. For instance, who would buy life insurance if it was a 50-50 chance the comp. would find some excuse to not pay?

You demand the health insurance be voluntary is just you finding an excuse to not be forced to support a Gov. function that every other civilized nation on earth has decided needs to be a Gov. function.

Now that the US has a fiat dollar the US is the only level of gov. in the US that can afford to take up this function. The states can't do it except for maybe the largest ones, like Calif.

Perhaps you also think that Soc. Sec. should also be voluntary. Here again Soc. Sec. is backed by "the full faith and credit" of the US. Since the credit of the US has no limit* in a fiat currency system, this means that there is no excuse for Congress to cut S.S. to make it solvent in 20 years.

The US does not have a spending problem [unless it is the military spending which is supported by the comp. that make huge profits off of it], the US's problem is it doesn't tax the rich [and maybe Corps.] anywhere near enough. [Because the rich support politicians who reduce their taxes and cut programs that keep poor people alive.]


.* . I can say this with great confidence because the US can create dollars and spend them. These dollars then can be borrowed back at a low interest rate to make the S.S. payments. Or, cut out the middleman and just make S.S. payments with newly created dollars until there are enough surplus dollars in the economy that people will want to lend them back to the Gov. and it can stop creating new dollars.
. . I know most of you don't understand that (+ is) how fiat currency works and therefore, think that such a system will cause hyper-inflation. It may cause some inflation (= general rise in prices), but this is better than the alternative of letting some retired people die in the "richest nation the world has ever known".

Add with the edit.
 
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lelandpike wrote:
jeff brown wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
eaglebeak wrote:
maxo-texas wrote:

“Although it’s the first of potentially many explosive votes, House Republicans’ willingness to spend political capital on a proposal that garnered the support of just 17 percent of the public in a March Quinnipiac poll is consistent with past scenarios that have generated a midterm wave,”

You know, when a country's dominant party is passing legislation that only 17% of the public is in support of, I dare say something is a tad amiss in the political process.

Sort of like when obamacare got rammed down our throats, huh?

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.

Are you saying that you want the option of not having health insurance?

Where do you stand on people with pre-existing conditions getting/keeping health insurance? Should they be able to do so? If so, how much should it cost per year?
 
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tmcvey wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
Quote:

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


Choose one:
1. Healthcare insurance being voluntary.
2. A functional individual insurance market where insurance companies cannot deny people based on preconditions.

You can't have both.

So then, you don't believe anyone ever received a disability payment of any kind from any agency of the government before obamacare forced us all to purchase exactly the sort health insurance that the government told us we had to buy?

You don't believe we could provide for those who are uninsured (because of a pre-existing condition or whatever) in a similar way so that individuals and employers would not have to pay for forms of so-called 'healthcare' that violate their faith or conscience?

Why would we want to refuse to even consider possibities other than those that most effectively take away liberty/autonomy from individuals and give government the most control over our lives?

 
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Steve
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lelandpike wrote:
tmcvey wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
Quote:

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


Choose one:
1. Healthcare insurance being voluntary.
2. A functional individual insurance market where insurance companies cannot deny people based on preconditions.

You can't have both.

So then, you don't believe anyone ever received a disability payment of any kind from any agency of the government before obamacare forced us all to purchase exactly the sort health insurance that the government told us we had to buy?

You don't believe we could provide for those who are uninsured (because of a pre-existing condition or whatever) in a similar way so that individuals and employers would not have to pay for forms of so-called 'healthcare' that violate their faith or conscience?

Why would we want to refuse to even consider possibities other than those that most effectively take away liberty/autonomy from individuals and give government the most control over our lives?

I am an atheistic Christian.

We have to draw the line somewhere between the 2 extremes of
1] Don't let a reborn Aztec religion cut the hearts out of living victims. And,
2] Let people do or not do whatever their religion requires of them.

We have to have a line there somewhere. You and I just disagree on where to draw it. [I think.}

As of now the Gov. doesn't let you discriminate against certain groups in public accommodations. And makes you pay money to a 2nd party who pays a 3rd party who pays a 4th party to do something that your religion doesn't like. How many different hands must money pass through before it can be spent in a way you don't approve of? Why can your employees spend their pay [that you paid] on things that your religion finds offensive? That is only 1 intervening step. Would it be OK if health insurance payments had 2 intervening steps?

Don't answer, I already know what you will say.
 
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lelandpike wrote:
tmcvey wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
Quote:

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


Choose one:
1. Healthcare insurance being voluntary.
2. A functional individual insurance market where insurance companies cannot deny people based on preconditions.

You can't have both.

So then, you don't believe anyone ever received a disability payment of any kind from any agency of the government before obamacare forced us all to purchase exactly the sort health insurance that the government told us we had to buy?

You don't believe we could provide for those who are uninsured (because of a pre-existing condition or whatever) in a similar way so that individuals and employers would not have to pay for forms of so-called 'healthcare' that violate their faith or conscience?

Why would we want to refuse to even consider possibities other than those that most effectively take away liberty/autonomy from individuals and give government the most control over our lives?



As to the bolded part, yeah, its called Single Payer attached to Universal Health Care. Now no one has their faith "violated". Problem solved
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lelandpike wrote:
tmcvey wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
Quote:

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


Choose one:
1. Healthcare insurance being voluntary.
2. A functional individual insurance market where insurance companies cannot deny people based on preconditions.

You can't have both.

So then, you don't believe anyone ever received a disability payment of any kind from any agency of the government before obamacare forced us all to purchase exactly the sort health insurance that the government told us we had to buy?

You don't believe we could provide for those who are uninsured (because of a pre-existing condition or whatever) in a similar way so that individuals and employers would not have to pay for forms of so-called 'healthcare' that violate their faith or conscience?

Why would we want to refuse to even consider possibities other than those that most effectively take away liberty/autonomy from individuals and give government the most control over our lives?



Ah, so a Libertarian.

Hey, when you guys come up with a way to provide healthcare, effectively, and at a decent cost, give me a jingle.

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darthhugo wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
tmcvey wrote:
lelandpike wrote:
Quote:

so what kind of health care plan do you think would work best?

For starters, one that's voluntary.


Choose one:
1. Healthcare insurance being voluntary.
2. A functional individual insurance market where insurance companies cannot deny people based on preconditions.

You can't have both.

So then, you don't believe anyone ever received a disability payment of any kind from any agency of the government before obamacare forced us all to purchase exactly the sort health insurance that the government told us we had to buy?

You don't believe we could provide for those who are uninsured (because of a pre-existing condition or whatever) in a similar way so that individuals and employers would not have to pay for forms of so-called 'healthcare' that violate their faith or conscience?

Why would we want to refuse to even consider possibities other than those that most effectively take away liberty/autonomy from individuals and give government the most control over our lives?



Ah, so a Libertarian.

Hey, when you guys come up with a way to provide healthcare, effectively, and at a decent cost, give me a jingle.



Libertarians, the folks who want the $5 a pound T-Bone steak without making the required $10 minimum purchase of other products.

Libertarians, wishing doesn't invalidate normal oppressive human behavior by oligiarchs.

Libertarians, calculating that a $1 billion dollar government can enforce the law and counter the power of $1 trillion dollars in the hands of private industry and the wealthy. Talk about "new" math.

Libertarians, ignoring the worst of the robber baron era for over 50 years!
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