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The Sixth Gun Role-playing Game» Forums » General

Subject: Painting Tutorial: General Oliander Bedford Hume rss

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Introduction: General Oliander Bedford Hume is part of the Sixth Gun metal miniatures set from Pinnacle Entertainment Group. Although some of the techniques tricks I used to paint this miniature are based on advanced techniques, I've modified them so a new painter can paint this miniature easily and quickly. If you are an experienced painter, this tutorial should at least have a miniature you can paint for this weekend's game, and work on more at your leisure.

Paints: To paint this miniature, I used Army Painter paints, but you should be able to use your own set of hobby paints. I do highly recommend the Army Painter Quickshade Ink set for new painters, and will be using the brown Strong Tone Ink and blue Blue Tone Ink in this tutorial. I expect to use the other inks in this set for later ones.

Mold lines: Miniatures are made from two (or more) mold halves, and, as a result, a small amount of metal or plastic may "leak" out. This is called flash, and needs to be trimmed off with a hobby knife ($5 at an arts and crafts store) and jeweler's file set ($5 at same). While my miniature didn't have it, there's always a chance of gaps, where not enough metal or plastic was used to fill the miniature. You can use greenstuff ($10 from hobby store) or Vallejo Plastic Putty ($3.50 at same) to fill in the gaps. After removing the mold lines, wash the miniature with a little soap and water.



Soap bubbles, dog hair, and flash not included.
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Primer: Both sides were sprayed with white hardware spray primer ($3.50 at the hardware store). Experienced painters can try using zenithal priming (search on "miniature painting zenithal priming").



White and shiny.
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Washes: For the first round of washes, I did a "slop and glop" of the coffin in brown Strong Tone Ink, and of the ghost in blue Blue Tone Ink. You can color the ghost various ways, but I used the same color scheme as the PEG photo of its painted miniatures. Do not paint the "waves" of the ghost -- these are actually white billows of air.



Wash doesn't work well on flat surfaces, like the sword, although if you like it, keep it!

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Coffin: For the coffin, just put a drop of every brown paint you have on your wet palette (search on "miniature painting wet palette"), as well as a drop of brown Strong Tone Ink. Start painting the coffin from the bottom to the top, starting with the darkest color. Once you use up, say, half of one color, start mixing in more of the next shade. You can also thin your paints with the brown wash, as well as mix in or use orange as a highlighter color. Then wash with brown Strong Tone Ink if you'd like, particularly filling in the recesses of the miniature.



Brown Army Painter paints from the Greenskins Kings of War Paint Set, and Zombicide Core Paint Set.
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Glow: You may have heard of the advanced miniature painting technique of Object Source Lighting, or OSL. This miniature is actually a very good miniature to practice OSL with, since, if you need to repaint the coffin, it's not difficult. Also, the "glow" of the chains is not realistic, so, even if it's a cartoony glow (I actually looked at Scooby Doo ghost pictures for reference!) it should work. For the glow, you can either use a pale blue paint, or mix in white and blue. For some reason, painting only the glow on the top half of the chains seemed to work.

Sword: The sword was painted with the source of the light being in front of the miniature. If you look at a curved sword, you will see flat part of the sword facing the front intersects the flat side of a sword at an angle. At this angle, you want to paint the front of the sword a reflective, in this case pale blue, color, and the side of the sword a non-reflective color, which will be dark blue. If you have experience with non-metal metallics (NMM), you can do some additional work here.

Highlights: For the raised parts of the miniatures, I then broadly and quickly raised the color of these areas to pale blue then white. This loses some detail, but we'll take care of this with the next step.



"And I would have gotten away with it too, if it weren't for you meddling kids"
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Dark Blue: I then used dark blue paint and Blue Tone Ink to color in the flat sideways part of the sword, as well as paint in any details of the ghost that still weren't visible.

Coffin: I also painted the "studs" in orange, then applied the Strong Tone Ink to the "studs" and into the recesses of the coffin.

Basing: I then used a simple base of half a cotton ball on each side of the miniature. I probably should have repainted the "wave" white so I could use less cotton, but I can always work on the miniature more later. Plenty of miniatures left to paint!



Off to raid the vitamin C bottle for more cotton!


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