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Heroes of the Great War: Limanowa 1914» Forums » General

Subject: Modular map and replayability rss

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Martin Röseler
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Hi.
I never played war games or war game like board games before but I am interessted in playing one.
Do you think a fixed map (not modular) is a problem for the replayability? I can imagine that after a few plays on the same map one begin to follow the same strategy over and over again and it becomes repetitive. I mean of yourse you have to adapt to the moves of you opponent. What I mean is like: In the first to moves I alwas rush into city X and put an artillery an position Y and so on. I believe after a few plays you know all the positions which give you a tactical advantage.
What dou you think abount fixed maps and replayability?
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Mark Sterner
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I'll just interject to say that the Limanowa map is not a generic map; it is an actual map of historical terrain. Accordingly you cannot change the topography nor would you want to. Since this is an historical battle you want the terrain to be accurate. Gladiator has spoken of possible expansions of the game with new historical maps.

Usually, geomorphic generic maps are used in low-level tactical wargames where tactical situations are arguably below the level of replicating exact historical terrain. They aren't ever used in operational or strategic wargames where the historical terrain is important. Limanowa is basically an operational level game.
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Gee Mand
Hungary
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(Almost) Every board game has a fixed map, and we replay it over and over again (Hannibal, Game of Thrones, chess...), because every start is a new beginning, maybe i could win in a smarter way, or just maybe i can win once...
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Peter Sasvari
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BountyHuntA wrote:
Hi.
I never played war games or war game like board games before but I am interessted in playing one.
Do you think a fixed map (not modular) is a problem for the replayability? I can imagine that after a few plays on the same map one begin to follow the same strategy over and over again and it becomes repetitive. I mean of yourse you have to adapt to the moves of you opponent. What I mean is like: In the first to moves I alwas rush into city X and put an artillery an position Y and so on. I believe after a few plays you know all the positions which give you a tactical advantage.
What dou you think abount fixed maps and replayability?


Hi, BountyHuntA, thanks for the question!

The short answer is: no battle is the same as before.

The long one:
We played well over 100 sessions with small scenarios and the large one (the actual Battle for Limanowa, 4-times bigger than the smalls). There were patterns emerging of course, like in every other game, but because there are so many variables in Limanowa 1914, you can only guess what the opponent's next move will be.

Let me phrase this another way: imagine regular chess. You have 16 figures, 8 of them are the same (Pawns), 6 are "officer units" and 2 are specialists (King and Queen). The other player has the very same army on an 8x8 map, where terrain doesn't play any role. Now let me ask you this question: is chess boring because of the lack of variability? I doubt so!

In Limanowa 1914 you have a handful of units at your disposal, the game provides a unit placement map unique to each scenario. This placement map shows several, colour coded spots where each army needs to place their units. On the large map, there are more spots than units in your hand, meaning that you need to make strategy decision even before beginning the game itself: where do you place which units? It's completely up to you, some spot will be left empty. This alone brings a large variety in gameplay: do you defend the empty tactical or strategical targets or leave them completely to the enemy? If you place units in every spot, your main army will have fewer units and the enemy can break through it more easily. And here come the battle cards into play. For example, the Hussar units can move two hexes because they sit on horses, the roads double their movement points, allowing them to move 4 hexes. Now imagine if you play a battle card which allows you to move with a unit 3 times in your round: the reach of the Hussars becomes 12 hexes! In comparison, the standard infantry units can move only 1 hex in their round.

Limanowa 1914 is very different from regular wargames, where you need a ruler to measure the distance to the enemy, or to wargames where you have multiple smaller units occupying the same hex. Limanowa is a good mixture of a boardgame and a wargame.

Of course, there are general advises one can give new players, for example, it's worth to put the Artillery Observer up on the mountain top and put an Artillery next to them because their synergy is crucial in most clashes, but there's no cookie-cutter setup where you win 100% of the time.
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Peter Andersson
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I like that the game board is static and historically accurate. Actually I wouldn't want it any other way. Why change history?
The game designers have compared this game to chess, and chess never plays exactly the same. So I'm not worried about the game getting repetitive.
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Zsolt Horvath
Hungary
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I wrote about our "map system" in this thread:
https://boardgamegeek.com/article/25887127#25887127

We want to make a lot of possibility for players and that was our idea about flexible gameboard. If you tired to play again and again (I think don't), You can make a custom playboard with the game map components (current and planned too) and you can make custom battles, not just our scenarios. You can make own scenarios.
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