Davis Stringer
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In this video: https://www.boardgamegeek.com/video/135898/path-light-and-sh...

Joel's video uses as an example the upgrading of a Halax Retainer to a Halax Mercenary, which required either 3 strength or 3 build. He used an advisor, which was a Translator (1s, 2b), and a Steadfast Conscript (2 s, 1b). The combo works either way because the total was 3s or 3b, either of which satisfied the cost of the upgrade.

But then I noticed that we just upgraded a card with 1s, 1b to a card with 2s, 2b...a net loss of 1s and 1b. Now I know some cards have other affects. Without a rulebook it's hard to know how much that may outweigh the loss of production. So, it's hard for me not to want to ask why I didn't just use the original cards to do what I wanted to do instead of making an upgrade? Or, even save a card (if I wanted/needed to). What if I only needed 2 strength? I could've then just used the 2 strength Steadfast Retainer to do whatever I would've used the now 2 strength Halax Merc to do...and saved my advisor for a better use (another question is whether or not she is now gone and lost to me).

There's apparently something I'm not getting.
 
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Big Head Zach
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The upgrade mechanic functions a lot like the Mine in Dominion - it doesn't add or remove cards from your deck but changes them to higher-valued, better-abilitied cards. Since you're forced to add a card to your deck every turn of the game (from the draw pile of the terrain type you ended your turn at), bloat will happen (moreso if you take 1 Mercy to draft a second card) unless you cull (which sends you back towards Cruelty on the track).

If you balance draw with trim, outside of any special effects, you will have a neutral morality which renders you unable to score points in certain ways and also restricts the utility of cards whose effects depend on your morality score.

If you go the Mercy route you will have a super-bloated deck but then are able to harness the effects of having a high Mercy (which includes gaining VP when Mercy is maxed out).

If you go the Cruelty route, your deck will be very small and inflexible, and you're only allowed to reduce your entire deck to 5 cards. But you'll probably be scoring VP for excess Cruelty as you keep the forced draws out of your deck.
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Kevin John
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Basically you are using your deck for 12 rounds. The earlier you upgrade a card, the longer you will have access to it (you won't have it for every round but you get the idea). So while it was a loss to upgrade the card for that turn, in the end you will get more use out of the upgraded card. Plus you can then upgrade it to the legendary version (if no one else has grabbed it already) which makes it even better.

In regards to the adviser, you do get to reuse them the same as any card. It goes into your discard pile to be shuffled and drawn again when your deck runs out.
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Davis Stringer
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bhz1 wrote:
The upgrade mechanic functions a lot like the Mine in Dominion - it doesn't add or remove cards from your deck but changes them to higher-valued, better-abilitied cards. Since you're forced to add a card to your deck every turn of the game (from the draw pile of the terrain type you ended your turn at), bloat will happen (moreso if you take 1 Mercy to draft a second card) unless you cull (which sends you back towards Cruelty on the track).

If you balance draw with trim, outside of any special effects, you will have a neutral morality which renders you unable to score points in certain ways and also restricts the utility of cards whose effects depend on your morality score.

If you go the Mercy route you will have a super-bloated deck but then are able to harness the effects of having a high Mercy (which includes gaining VP when Mercy is maxed out).

If you go the Cruelty route, your deck will be very small and inflexible, and you're only allowed to reduce your entire deck to 5 cards. But you'll probably be scoring VP for excess Cruelty as you keep the forced draws out of your deck.


So, in the example of my OP I'm keeping the Steadfast Conscript and Translator? It sounded like I played (lost/discard?) them.
 
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Kevin John
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stevuscaticus wrote:
So, in the example of my OP I'm keeping the Steadfast Conscript and Translator? It sounded like I played (lost/discard?) them.


You do play them, and then discard them. Once your deck runs out you will shuffle up your discard pile and make your deck again (this time with all the cards you've upgraded/recruited). The only card that gets removed is the one that gets upgraded.

Sounds like you could be new to deckbuilders, is that the case?
 
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Davis Stringer
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kevinjohn3d wrote:
stevuscaticus wrote:
So, in the example of my OP I'm keeping the Steadfast Conscript and Translator? It sounded like I played (lost/discard?) them.


You do play them, and then discard them. Once your deck runs out you will shuffle up your discard pile and make your deck again (this time with all the cards you've upgraded/recruited). The only card that gets removed is the one that gets upgraded.

Sounds like you could be new to deckbuilders, is that the case?


This'll be the first I think...at least as far as true deck building.
 
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Kevin John
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stevuscaticus wrote:
This'll be the first I think...at least as far as true deck building.


Awesome! It's my wife's and my favorite game mechanic. Although to be fair, this isn't a true deck builder. The deck part of Path is, but how you get the cards isn't. Where you get the cards is usually called a supply or market (or some other themed name depending on the game).

In Dominion style games, there is a market of X different types of cards. You usually have access to all the cards at all times so you can choose whatever you want to purchase, as long as you can afford the cost.

In Ascension style games, you take the same kind of market that Dominion has and shuffle the entire market together to make one big deck. Then you deal out X amount of cards that are available to purchase. These cards get replaced from the market deck whenever someone buys a card. This limits what is available to you on your turn.

In Path you will recruit cards from a realm deck where you know the majority, medium, and minority card types in the deck, based off the location of your character. This is not a common way of recruiting in deckbuilders. (I don't think I've ever seen it actually).

Hope this helps!
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Maciej Perkowski
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Getting better cards and ridding of worse is the key mechanic in deck builder. You start with a deck of weak cards. When you buy/upgrade cards you're making your deck stronger. Every turn you get a finite amount of cards, so you want to get rid of weaker which are diluting your deck. Removing them increases the chance to get better cards in your draws.
When I played a deck builder for the first time I also didn't figure out how important card removal is. You start with the idea that the more the better but it is actually opposite.
Also since you have fixed about of cards drawn every time with stronger cards you can do more. 5 starters with an attack value of, let's say 2, adds up to 10. Exchanging them for stronger ones increase the maximal attack/build you can pull in one turn.
It's it more clear now?
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